Survey tracks comets and NEOs

Survey tracks comets and NEOs NEWS ExoMars goes to work, sample-return takes step forward MARS April marked some milestones for the Sephton outlined in the February 2018 issue (A&G Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System, CaSSIS, exploration of Mars: the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars 2018 59 1.36), but also in the coordination of three took this spectacular image of Korolev crater, at high orbiter sent back its first pictures of Mars from a near- spacecraft, two landings and a launch from Mars. northern latitudes. “We were really pleased to see how circular 400 km-altitude orbit, while NASA and ESA One element is already in place: NASA’s 2020 Mars good this picture was, given the lighting conditions,” signed an agreement to work together to explore the rover will collect and store samples in preparation for said Antoine Pommerol, a member of the CaSSIS team possibilities for returning martian samples to Earth. a possible future mission to collect them. In a sign of working on the calibration of the data. “It shows that ESA’s director of human and robotic exploration, the potential for collaboration, the ExoMars orbiter has CaSSIS can make a major contribution to studies of David Parker, and NASA’s associate administrator for already transmitted data from NASA’s Curiosity rover the carbon dioxide and water cycles on Mars.” TGO the science mission directorate, Thomas Zurbuchen, back to Earth, adding to the martian communications also carries two spectrometer suites and a neutron signed the statement of intent on 26 April at the ILA infrastructure. A prime role of this orbiter, however, is detector. In this orientation, north is o- ff centre to the Berlin Air Show. Sample-return from Mars is a complex to investigate the atmospheric composition of Mars, upper left. (ESA/Roscosmos/CaSSIS) undertaking, not only in sample selection, as Mark its methane in particular. The Trace Gas Orbiter’s http://bit.ly/2dOD8EO RAS conserves Survey tracks Pearson family comets and NEOs portrait NEOWISE NASA has released four years of data from its Near-Earth Object Wide-e fi ld Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) spacecraft. The data include 788 near-Earth objects and 136 comets found since the mission restart in 2013. NEOWISE was originally the astrophysics mission WISE, which finished in 2011; the repurposed spacecraft tracks near-Earth asteroids and characterizes more distant populations of asteroids and comets. It detected 29 246 objects in four years. RAS A portrait of William Pear- The image represents the solar system son, which will be familiar to in December 2017: main-belt asteroids many members of the RAS from (grey), near-Earth asteroids (green), the Fellows’ Room, has been con- comets (yellow), objects discovered in served, possibly for the first time n fi al week (white), Earth’s orbit (cyan), since it was painted by Arthur and other terrestrial planet orbits (blue). Phillips in 1808. In this, the best (NASA/JPL-Caltech/PSI) known portrait of Pearson, one http://bit.ly/1RpHbln of the founders of the RAS (A&G 2017 58 5.12), he is portrayed pointing out one of his planetary Machine learning gains ground in astronomy machines to his first wife Frances, and his only daughter, also COMPUTING Machine learning Telescope. It tested the process standard approach to calculat- Frances. The orrery in the paint- is becoming a useful tool for on actual HST images and found ing the stability of orbits has not ing has sadly not survived. The astronomical data selection, as success. The work is published proved useful. Instead, Chris portrait was cleaned and revar- two projects show. in The Astrophysical Journal by Lam (Columbia University, USA) nished, giving fuller saturation “Deep learning”, developed for Huertas-Company et al. and colleagues used a large train- to the colours. Essential remedial such applications as facial recog- A different approach has ing set of stable orbits for binary treatment was carried out on the nition, has been used for galaxy helped to refine estimates of systems, and their network was frame, and low-ree fl ction UV classic fi ation. An international which exoplanets in binary star able to out-perform the accuracy protection glazing was installed, team trained its software on sim- systems have a chance of being of the standard approach after so that the newly revived colours ulations of three stages of galaxy not just habitable, but survivable. just a few hours. of this family portrait will be evolution, as they would appear Such planets need a stable orbit GALAXIES http://bit.ly/2waEdiG preserved for the future. if observed by the Hubble Space for life to have any chance, but the EXOPLANETS http://bit.ly/2JLquk6 A&G • June 2018 • Vol. 59 • aandg.org 3.5 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/astrogeo/article-abstract/59/3/3.5/4995395 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 20 June 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Astronomy & Geophysics Oxford University Press

Survey tracks comets and NEOs

Astronomy & Geophysics , Volume Advance Article (3) – Jun 1, 2018
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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2018 Royal Astronomical Society
ISSN
1366-8781
eISSN
1468-4004
D.O.I.
10.1093/astrogeo/aty105
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Abstract

NEWS ExoMars goes to work, sample-return takes step forward MARS April marked some milestones for the Sephton outlined in the February 2018 issue (A&G Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System, CaSSIS, exploration of Mars: the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars 2018 59 1.36), but also in the coordination of three took this spectacular image of Korolev crater, at high orbiter sent back its first pictures of Mars from a near- spacecraft, two landings and a launch from Mars. northern latitudes. “We were really pleased to see how circular 400 km-altitude orbit, while NASA and ESA One element is already in place: NASA’s 2020 Mars good this picture was, given the lighting conditions,” signed an agreement to work together to explore the rover will collect and store samples in preparation for said Antoine Pommerol, a member of the CaSSIS team possibilities for returning martian samples to Earth. a possible future mission to collect them. In a sign of working on the calibration of the data. “It shows that ESA’s director of human and robotic exploration, the potential for collaboration, the ExoMars orbiter has CaSSIS can make a major contribution to studies of David Parker, and NASA’s associate administrator for already transmitted data from NASA’s Curiosity rover the carbon dioxide and water cycles on Mars.” TGO the science mission directorate, Thomas Zurbuchen, back to Earth, adding to the martian communications also carries two spectrometer suites and a neutron signed the statement of intent on 26 April at the ILA infrastructure. A prime role of this orbiter, however, is detector. In this orientation, north is o- ff centre to the Berlin Air Show. Sample-return from Mars is a complex to investigate the atmospheric composition of Mars, upper left. (ESA/Roscosmos/CaSSIS) undertaking, not only in sample selection, as Mark its methane in particular. The Trace Gas Orbiter’s http://bit.ly/2dOD8EO RAS conserves Survey tracks Pearson family comets and NEOs portrait NEOWISE NASA has released four years of data from its Near-Earth Object Wide-e fi ld Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) spacecraft. The data include 788 near-Earth objects and 136 comets found since the mission restart in 2013. NEOWISE was originally the astrophysics mission WISE, which finished in 2011; the repurposed spacecraft tracks near-Earth asteroids and characterizes more distant populations of asteroids and comets. It detected 29 246 objects in four years. RAS A portrait of William Pear- The image represents the solar system son, which will be familiar to in December 2017: main-belt asteroids many members of the RAS from (grey), near-Earth asteroids (green), the Fellows’ Room, has been con- comets (yellow), objects discovered in served, possibly for the first time n fi al week (white), Earth’s orbit (cyan), since it was painted by Arthur and other terrestrial planet orbits (blue). Phillips in 1808. In this, the best (NASA/JPL-Caltech/PSI) known portrait of Pearson, one http://bit.ly/1RpHbln of the founders of the RAS (A&G 2017 58 5.12), he is portrayed pointing out one of his planetary Machine learning gains ground in astronomy machines to his first wife Frances, and his only daughter, also COMPUTING Machine learning Telescope. It tested the process standard approach to calculat- Frances. The orrery in the paint- is becoming a useful tool for on actual HST images and found ing the stability of orbits has not ing has sadly not survived. The astronomical data selection, as success. The work is published proved useful. Instead, Chris portrait was cleaned and revar- two projects show. in The Astrophysical Journal by Lam (Columbia University, USA) nished, giving fuller saturation “Deep learning”, developed for Huertas-Company et al. and colleagues used a large train- to the colours. Essential remedial such applications as facial recog- A different approach has ing set of stable orbits for binary treatment was carried out on the nition, has been used for galaxy helped to refine estimates of systems, and their network was frame, and low-ree fl ction UV classic fi ation. An international which exoplanets in binary star able to out-perform the accuracy protection glazing was installed, team trained its software on sim- systems have a chance of being of the standard approach after so that the newly revived colours ulations of three stages of galaxy not just habitable, but survivable. just a few hours. of this family portrait will be evolution, as they would appear Such planets need a stable orbit GALAXIES http://bit.ly/2waEdiG preserved for the future. if observed by the Hubble Space for life to have any chance, but the EXOPLANETS http://bit.ly/2JLquk6 A&G • June 2018 • Vol. 59 • aandg.org 3.5 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/astrogeo/article-abstract/59/3/3.5/4995395 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 20 June 2018

Journal

Astronomy & GeophysicsOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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