Surgical Anatomy of the Infratemporal Fossa: The Styloid Diaphragm Revisited

Surgical Anatomy of the Infratemporal Fossa: The Styloid Diaphragm Revisited AbstractINTRODUCTION:The infratemporal fossa (ITF) gives passage to most major cerebral vessels and cranial nerves. Dissection of the ITF is essential in many of the lateral cranial base approaches and in exposure of the high cervical internal carotid artery (ICA). We reviewed the surgical anatomy of this region.METHODS:Direct foraminal measurements were made in seven dry skulls (14 sides), and the relationship of these foramina to each other and various landmarks were determined. Ten ITF dissections were performed using a preauricular subtemporal-infratemporal approach. Preliminary dissections of the extracranial great vessels and structures larger than 1 cm were performed using standard macroscopic surgical techniques. Dissection of all structures less than 1 cm was conducted using microsurgical techniques and instruments, including the operating microscope. The anatomic relationships of the muscles, nerves, arteries, and veins were carefully recorded, with special emphasis regarding the relationship of these structures to the styloid diaphragm. The dissection was purely extradural.RESULTS:The styloid diaphragm was identified in all specimens. It divides the ITF into the prestyloid region and the retrostyloid region. The prestyloid region contains the parotid gland and associated structures, including the facial nerve and external carotid artery. The retrostyloid region contains major vascular structures (ICA, internal jugularvein) and the initial exocranial portion of the lower Cranial Nerves IX through XII. Landmarks were identified for the different cranial nerves. The bifurcation of the main trunk of the facial nerve was an average of 21 mm medial to the cartilaginous pointer and an average of 31 mm medial to the tragus of the ear. The glossopharyngeal nerve was found posterior and lateral to stylopharyngeus muscle in nine cases and medial in only one. The vagus nerve was consistently found in the angle formed posteriorly by the ICA and the internal jugular vein. The spinal accessory nerve crossed anterior to the internal jugular vein in five cases and posterior in another five cases. It could be located as it entered the medial surface of the sternocleidomastoid muscle 28 mm (mean) below the mastoid tip. The hypoglossal nerve was most consistently identified as it crossed under the sternocleidomastoid branch of the occipital artery 25 mm posterior to the angle of the mandible and 52 mm anterior and inferior to the mastoid tip.CONCLUSION:The styloid diaphragm divides the ITF into prestyloid and retrostyloid regions and covers the high cervical ICA. Using landmarks for the exocranial portion of the lower cranial nerves is useful in identifying them and avoiding injury during approaches to the high cervical ICA, the upper cervical spine, and the ITF. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Surgical Anatomy of the Infratemporal Fossa: The Styloid Diaphragm Revisited

Surgical Anatomy of the Infratemporal Fossa: The Styloid Diaphragm Revisited

A N A T O M IC R EPO R T Surgical Anatomy of the Infratemporal Fossa: The Styloid Diaphragm Revisited Ghassan K. Bejjani, M.D., Brian Sullivan, M.D., Eduardo Salas-Lopez, M.D., Jhon Abello, M.D., Donald C. Wright, M.D., Abdo Jurjus, Ph.D., Laligam N. Sekhar, M.D. Departments of Neurosurgery (BS, ES-L, JA, D C W , LNS) and Anatomy and Cell Biology (AJ), George Washington University, Washington, District of Colum bia, and the Department of Neurosurgery (GKB), Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania IN T R O D U C T IO N : The infratemporal fossa (ITF) gives passage to most major cerebral vessels and cranial nerves. Dissection of the ITF is essential in many of the lateral cranial base approaches and in exposure of the high cervical internal carotid artery (ICA). We reviewed the surgical anatomy of this region. METHODS: Direct foraminal measurements were made in seven dry skulls (14 sides), and the relationship of these foramina to each other and various landmarks were determined. Ten ITF dissections were performed using a preauricular subtemporal-infratemporal approach. Preliminary dissections of the extracranial great vessels and struc­ tures larger than 1 cm were performed using standard macroscopic surgical techniques. Dissection of all structures less than 1 cm was conducted using microsurgical techniques and instruments, including the operating microscope. The anatomic relationships of the muscles, nerves, arteries, and veins were carefully recorded, with special emphasis regarding the relationship of these structures to the styloid diaphragm. The dissection was purely extradural. RESULTS: The styloid diaphragm was identified in all specimens. It divides the ITF into the prestyloid region and the retrostyloid region. The prestyloid region contains the parotid gland and associated structures, including the facial nerve and external carotid artery. The retrostyloid region contains major vascular structures (ICA, internal jugular vein) and the...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/surgical-anatomy-of-the-infratemporal-fossa-the-styloid-diaphragm-6UWP0Dz1B8
Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199810000-00072
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractINTRODUCTION:The infratemporal fossa (ITF) gives passage to most major cerebral vessels and cranial nerves. Dissection of the ITF is essential in many of the lateral cranial base approaches and in exposure of the high cervical internal carotid artery (ICA). We reviewed the surgical anatomy of this region.METHODS:Direct foraminal measurements were made in seven dry skulls (14 sides), and the relationship of these foramina to each other and various landmarks were determined. Ten ITF dissections were performed using a preauricular subtemporal-infratemporal approach. Preliminary dissections of the extracranial great vessels and structures larger than 1 cm were performed using standard macroscopic surgical techniques. Dissection of all structures less than 1 cm was conducted using microsurgical techniques and instruments, including the operating microscope. The anatomic relationships of the muscles, nerves, arteries, and veins were carefully recorded, with special emphasis regarding the relationship of these structures to the styloid diaphragm. The dissection was purely extradural.RESULTS:The styloid diaphragm was identified in all specimens. It divides the ITF into the prestyloid region and the retrostyloid region. The prestyloid region contains the parotid gland and associated structures, including the facial nerve and external carotid artery. The retrostyloid region contains major vascular structures (ICA, internal jugularvein) and the initial exocranial portion of the lower Cranial Nerves IX through XII. Landmarks were identified for the different cranial nerves. The bifurcation of the main trunk of the facial nerve was an average of 21 mm medial to the cartilaginous pointer and an average of 31 mm medial to the tragus of the ear. The glossopharyngeal nerve was found posterior and lateral to stylopharyngeus muscle in nine cases and medial in only one. The vagus nerve was consistently found in the angle formed posteriorly by the ICA and the internal jugular vein. The spinal accessory nerve crossed anterior to the internal jugular vein in five cases and posterior in another five cases. It could be located as it entered the medial surface of the sternocleidomastoid muscle 28 mm (mean) below the mastoid tip. The hypoglossal nerve was most consistently identified as it crossed under the sternocleidomastoid branch of the occipital artery 25 mm posterior to the angle of the mandible and 52 mm anterior and inferior to the mastoid tip.CONCLUSION:The styloid diaphragm divides the ITF into prestyloid and retrostyloid regions and covers the high cervical ICA. Using landmarks for the exocranial portion of the lower cranial nerves is useful in identifying them and avoiding injury during approaches to the high cervical ICA, the upper cervical spine, and the ITF.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Oct 1, 1998

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off