Strengthening data to inform building code improvements: time for an international dialogueEditorial for the European Journal of Public Health

Strengthening data to inform building code improvements: time for an international... Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/eurpub/article-abstract/28/5/788/4971516 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 17 October 2018 788 European Journal of Public Health 4 Rechel B, Jakubowski E, McKee M, Nolte E, editors. Organization and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507326/ (14 September 2018, date last Financing of Public Health Services in Europe. Copenhagen: World Health accessed). Organization, (acting as the host organization for, and secretariat of, the 5 Stahl T, Wismar M, Ollila E, et al. Health in All Policies. Prospects and Potentials. European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies), 2018. Available at: Helsinki: Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, 2006. The European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 28, No. 5, 788 The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved. doi:10.1093/eurpub/cky063 Advance Access published on 16 April 2018 ......................................................................................................... Strengthening data to inform building code improvements: time for an international dialogue Editorial for the European Journal of Public Health 1 2 James Chauvin , Nancy Edwards 1 Independent public health consultant and advocate, Gatineau, QC, Canada 2 School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Correspondence: James Chauvin, 21 rue James-Byrne, Gatineau, QC J9H 7J9, Canada, Tel: +1 (819) 918 2963, e-mail: jamesbchauvin@gmail.com ......................................................................................................... n many countries, the process for developing model codes that be integrated into the injury data surveillance system to address this govern the design, construction and alteration of buildings data gap. A working group hosted by CPHA and co-chaired by us is involves weighing the evidence about the cost-effectiveness of tasked with developing these questions, using recent scoping and proposed changes while ensuring the long-term durability and systematic reviews to help guide the process. We are examining structural integrity of buildings. In some countries, such as how these questions can be used within both injury surveillance and longitudinal cohort studies. Canada, these codes are based on minimum standards in the areas of safety, health, accessibility, energy efficiency and fire protection. The injury data caveat we have identified is not unique to Canada; we think the slate of questions our working group develops will also They provide passive protection for the population. These codes are not only important determinants of health; but be useful for European colleagues. We would welcome an interna- tional dialogue about this. It’s going to take a concerted effort in also critical policies that can potentially decrease fatal and non-fatal many countries to gather the data needed to better inform code injuries. In Canada, injuries due to falls account annually for over 1 development and to create a built environment that is more likely million emergency room visits, 128 000 hospitalizations, more to prevent injuries for people of all ages. Perhaps the 16th World than 4000 deaths and 25 000 people with disability. The most Congress on Public Health (to be held in Rome in October 2020) recent estimate of the total direct and indirect cost of falls-related will provide an opportunity to co-convene a session on how injury injury in Canada exceeded CAD$8.6 billion. surveillance systems can be enhanced to provide robust data that Although injury surveillance systems provide important data better inform building codes. about the prevalence rates and location of injuries, certain population sub-groups may be under-represented in these Conflicts of interest: None declared. databases and details about falls with less serious injuries may go unreported. For example, the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program relies on data collected for patients References presenting to emergency rooms in urban hospitals. As a result, injuries among those living in rural and remote areas, including 1 Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes. Review of the Coordinated Code indigenous peoples, are under-represented. Furthermore, surveil- Development System. Report on Phase 1 – The System. Joint CCBFC/PTPACC Task Group – Code Development System Review. Ottawa, Canada: National Research lance systems do not provide the kind of data required to Centre of Canada, 2016. Available at: https://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/obj/doc/solutions- adequately inform modifications to the specific technical require- solutions/advisory-consultatifs/codes_centre-centre_codes/commission/JTG_CDSR_ ments of building codes. For instance, the US Consumer Product Approved_System_Report.2016-06-27.pdf (26 February 2018, date last accessed). Safety Commission’s National Electronic Injury Surveillance System 2 Parachute. The Cost of Injury in Canada. Toronto, ON: Parachute, 2015. Available contains data that identifies the location of the injury and the at: http://www.parachutecanada.org/downloads/research/Cost_of_Injury-2015.pdf product involved (e.g. stairway, bathtub/shower, toilet), but not (26 February 2018, date last accessed). the building design characteristics implicated (e.g. tread width or 3GovernmentofCanada[Internet]. Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention riser height of stairs, handrail design or slope and diameter of 4 Program. Ottawa, Canada: Public Health Agency of Canada. Available at: https://www. installed bathroom grab bars). Therefore, injury surveillance data canada.ca/en/public-health/services/injury-prevention/canadian-hospitals-injury- generally lack the technical specificity needed to inform code reporting-prevention-program.html (26 February 2018, date last accessed). changes. This data gap is a major barrier to developing evidence- 5 4 United States Government [Internet]. National Electronic Injury Surveillance System based positions and advocacy on code-related issues. (NEISS). Bethesda, Maryland, USA: Consumer Product Safety Commission. https://www. Over the past several years public health researchers and organ- cpsc.gov/Research–Statistics/NEISS-Injury-Data (26 February 2018, date last accessed). izations, including the Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA), 5 Edwards N. Knowledge translation for intersectoral action: the case of Canada’s have advocated to the government of Canada for improvements in building codes. In: Bourgeault IL, Labonte R, Packer C, Runnels V, editors. the country’s injury surveillance systems and to strengthen links to Population Health in Canada: Issues, Research, and Action, Chapter 15. Toronto, ON: code-related issues. In January of this year the Public Health Agency Canada Scholars Press, 2017. of Canada encouraged us to develop a slate of questions that might http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The European Journal of Public Health Oxford University Press

Strengthening data to inform building code improvements: time for an international dialogueEditorial for the European Journal of Public Health

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Abstract

Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/eurpub/article-abstract/28/5/788/4971516 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 17 October 2018 788 European Journal of Public Health 4 Rechel B, Jakubowski E, McKee M, Nolte E, editors. Organization and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK507326/ (14 September 2018, date last Financing of Public Health Services in Europe. Copenhagen: World Health accessed). Organization, (acting as the host organization for, and secretariat of, the 5 Stahl T, Wismar M, Ollila E, et al. Health in All Policies. Prospects and Potentials. European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies), 2018. Available at: Helsinki: Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, 2006. The European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 28, No. 5, 788 The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved. doi:10.1093/eurpub/cky063 Advance Access published on 16 April 2018 ......................................................................................................... Strengthening data to inform building code improvements: time for an international dialogue Editorial for the European Journal of Public Health 1 2 James Chauvin , Nancy Edwards 1 Independent public health consultant and advocate, Gatineau, QC, Canada 2 School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Correspondence: James Chauvin, 21 rue James-Byrne, Gatineau, QC J9H 7J9, Canada, Tel: +1 (819) 918 2963, e-mail: jamesbchauvin@gmail.com ......................................................................................................... n many countries, the process for developing model codes that be integrated into the injury data surveillance system to address this govern the design, construction and alteration of buildings data gap. A working group hosted by CPHA and co-chaired by us is involves weighing the evidence about the cost-effectiveness of tasked with developing these questions, using recent scoping and proposed changes while ensuring the long-term durability and systematic reviews to help guide the process. We are examining structural integrity of buildings. In some countries, such as how these questions can be used within both injury surveillance and longitudinal cohort studies. Canada, these codes are based on minimum standards in the areas of safety, health, accessibility, energy efficiency and fire protection. The injury data caveat we have identified is not unique to Canada; we think the slate of questions our working group develops will also They provide passive protection for the population. These codes are not only important determinants of health; but be useful for European colleagues. We would welcome an interna- tional dialogue about this. It’s going to take a concerted effort in also critical policies that can potentially decrease fatal and non-fatal many countries to gather the data needed to better inform code injuries. In Canada, injuries due to falls account annually for over 1 development and to create a built environment that is more likely million emergency room visits, 128 000 hospitalizations, more to prevent injuries for people of all ages. Perhaps the 16th World than 4000 deaths and 25 000 people with disability. The most Congress on Public Health (to be held in Rome in October 2020) recent estimate of the total direct and indirect cost of falls-related will provide an opportunity to co-convene a session on how injury injury in Canada exceeded CAD$8.6 billion. surveillance systems can be enhanced to provide robust data that Although injury surveillance systems provide important data better inform building codes. about the prevalence rates and location of injuries, certain population sub-groups may be under-represented in these Conflicts of interest: None declared. databases and details about falls with less serious injuries may go unreported. For example, the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program relies on data collected for patients References presenting to emergency rooms in urban hospitals. As a result, injuries among those living in rural and remote areas, including 1 Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes. Review of the Coordinated Code indigenous peoples, are under-represented. Furthermore, surveil- Development System. Report on Phase 1 – The System. Joint CCBFC/PTPACC Task Group – Code Development System Review. Ottawa, Canada: National Research lance systems do not provide the kind of data required to Centre of Canada, 2016. Available at: https://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/obj/doc/solutions- adequately inform modifications to the specific technical require- solutions/advisory-consultatifs/codes_centre-centre_codes/commission/JTG_CDSR_ ments of building codes. For instance, the US Consumer Product Approved_System_Report.2016-06-27.pdf (26 February 2018, date last accessed). Safety Commission’s National Electronic Injury Surveillance System 2 Parachute. The Cost of Injury in Canada. Toronto, ON: Parachute, 2015. Available contains data that identifies the location of the injury and the at: http://www.parachutecanada.org/downloads/research/Cost_of_Injury-2015.pdf product involved (e.g. stairway, bathtub/shower, toilet), but not (26 February 2018, date last accessed). the building design characteristics implicated (e.g. tread width or 3GovernmentofCanada[Internet]. Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention riser height of stairs, handrail design or slope and diameter of 4 Program. Ottawa, Canada: Public Health Agency of Canada. Available at: https://www. installed bathroom grab bars). Therefore, injury surveillance data canada.ca/en/public-health/services/injury-prevention/canadian-hospitals-injury- generally lack the technical specificity needed to inform code reporting-prevention-program.html (26 February 2018, date last accessed). changes. This data gap is a major barrier to developing evidence- 5 4 United States Government [Internet]. National Electronic Injury Surveillance System based positions and advocacy on code-related issues. (NEISS). Bethesda, Maryland, USA: Consumer Product Safety Commission. https://www. Over the past several years public health researchers and organ- cpsc.gov/Research–Statistics/NEISS-Injury-Data (26 February 2018, date last accessed). izations, including the Canadian Public Health Association (CPHA), 5 Edwards N. Knowledge translation for intersectoral action: the case of Canada’s have advocated to the government of Canada for improvements in building codes. In: Bourgeault IL, Labonte R, Packer C, Runnels V, editors. the country’s injury surveillance systems and to strengthen links to Population Health in Canada: Issues, Research, and Action, Chapter 15. Toronto, ON: code-related issues. In January of this year the Public Health Agency Canada Scholars Press, 2017. of Canada encouraged us to develop a slate of questions that might

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The European Journal of Public HealthOxford University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2018

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