Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation in Daphnia pulex in Selection-Free vs. Competitive Environments

Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation in Daphnia pulex in Selection-Free vs. Competitive Environments Understanding the rates, spectra, and fitness effects of spontaneous mutations is fundamental to answering key questions in evolution, molecular biology, disease genetics, and conservation biology. To estimate mutation rates and evaluate the effect of selection on new mutations, we propagated mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Daphnia pulex for more than 82 generations and maintained a non-MA population under conditions where selection could act. Both experiments were started with the same obligate asexual progenitor clone. By sequencing 30 genomes and implementing a series of validation steps that informed the bioinformatic analyses, we identified a total of 477 single nucleotide mutations (SNMs) in the MA lines, corresponding to a mutation rate of 2.30 × 10−9 (95% CI 1.90–2.70 × 10−9) per nucleotide per generation. The high overall rate of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 4.82 × 10−5 per site per generation was due to a large ameiotic recombination event spanning an entire arm of a chromosome (∼6 Mb) and several hemizygous deletion events spanning ∼2 kb each. In the non-MA population, we found significantly fewer mutations than expected based on the rate derived from the MA experiment, indicating purifying selection was likely acting to remove new deleterious mutations. We observed a surprisingly high level of genetic variability in the non-MA population, which we propose to be driven by balancing selection. Our findings suggest that both positive and negative selection on new mutations is powerful and effective in a strictly clonal population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Biology and Evolution Oxford University Press

Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation in Daphnia pulex in Selection-Free vs. Competitive Environments

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0737-4038
eISSN
1537-1719
D.O.I.
10.1093/molbev/msw234
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Understanding the rates, spectra, and fitness effects of spontaneous mutations is fundamental to answering key questions in evolution, molecular biology, disease genetics, and conservation biology. To estimate mutation rates and evaluate the effect of selection on new mutations, we propagated mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Daphnia pulex for more than 82 generations and maintained a non-MA population under conditions where selection could act. Both experiments were started with the same obligate asexual progenitor clone. By sequencing 30 genomes and implementing a series of validation steps that informed the bioinformatic analyses, we identified a total of 477 single nucleotide mutations (SNMs) in the MA lines, corresponding to a mutation rate of 2.30 × 10−9 (95% CI 1.90–2.70 × 10−9) per nucleotide per generation. The high overall rate of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 4.82 × 10−5 per site per generation was due to a large ameiotic recombination event spanning an entire arm of a chromosome (∼6 Mb) and several hemizygous deletion events spanning ∼2 kb each. In the non-MA population, we found significantly fewer mutations than expected based on the rate derived from the MA experiment, indicating purifying selection was likely acting to remove new deleterious mutations. We observed a surprisingly high level of genetic variability in the non-MA population, which we propose to be driven by balancing selection. Our findings suggest that both positive and negative selection on new mutations is powerful and effective in a strictly clonal population.

Journal

Molecular Biology and EvolutionOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2017

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