Sniffin’ Away the Feeding Tube - The Influence of Olfactory Stimulation on Oral Food Intake in Newborns and Premature Infants

Sniffin’ Away the Feeding Tube - The Influence of Olfactory Stimulation on Oral Food Intake in... Abstract Because of their immaturity many premature infants are fed via nasogastric tube. One objective of the neonatal care is to feed infants orally early. The olfactory function of premature infants is developed before birth and odorants have a significant impact on nutrition in infants. The aim of the study was to test whether odor stimulation has a positive effect on the transition from gavage to oral feeding in infants. Participants were premature infants with gestational age of more than 27 weeks, with full or partial gavage feeding, stable vital parameters and without invasive ventilation. Before each feeding procedure an odorant was presented in front of the infant’s nose. Infants were randomized into one of three groups and received either rose odor (not food-associated), vanilla odor (food-associated) or placebo (no odor). The primary outcome of the study was defined as the time until complete oral nutrition. 150 children born at a postnatal age of 9.5±7.8 days were included in this study. The duration until complete oral nutrition was reached after 11.8±7.7 (vanilla), 12.2±7.7 (rose) and 12.9±8.8 (control) days. A nearly linear relation between odor presentation frequency and effect size was detectable. For infants that received the intervention for more than 66.7% of the time the length of gavage feeding (8±5.4) and hospitalization (11±6.5) was significantly lower in the vanilla group when compared with control (15±7.3 and 21±13.7 respectively). Odor stimulation with vanilla has an impact on oral feeding in premature infants, however the odor has to be presented on regular basis. nutrition, olfaction, premature infant, gavage © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Chemical Senses Oxford University Press

Sniffin’ Away the Feeding Tube - The Influence of Olfactory Stimulation on Oral Food Intake in Newborns and Premature Infants

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0379-864X
eISSN
1464-3553
D.O.I.
10.1093/chemse/bjy034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Because of their immaturity many premature infants are fed via nasogastric tube. One objective of the neonatal care is to feed infants orally early. The olfactory function of premature infants is developed before birth and odorants have a significant impact on nutrition in infants. The aim of the study was to test whether odor stimulation has a positive effect on the transition from gavage to oral feeding in infants. Participants were premature infants with gestational age of more than 27 weeks, with full or partial gavage feeding, stable vital parameters and without invasive ventilation. Before each feeding procedure an odorant was presented in front of the infant’s nose. Infants were randomized into one of three groups and received either rose odor (not food-associated), vanilla odor (food-associated) or placebo (no odor). The primary outcome of the study was defined as the time until complete oral nutrition. 150 children born at a postnatal age of 9.5±7.8 days were included in this study. The duration until complete oral nutrition was reached after 11.8±7.7 (vanilla), 12.2±7.7 (rose) and 12.9±8.8 (control) days. A nearly linear relation between odor presentation frequency and effect size was detectable. For infants that received the intervention for more than 66.7% of the time the length of gavage feeding (8±5.4) and hospitalization (11±6.5) was significantly lower in the vanilla group when compared with control (15±7.3 and 21±13.7 respectively). Odor stimulation with vanilla has an impact on oral feeding in premature infants, however the odor has to be presented on regular basis. nutrition, olfaction, premature infant, gavage © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Chemical SensesOxford University Press

Published: Jun 2, 2018

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