Shorter Time to Pregnancy With Increasing Preconception Carotene Concentrations Among Women With 1 to 2 Previous Pregnancy Losses

Shorter Time to Pregnancy With Increasing Preconception Carotene Concentrations Among Women With... Abstract Although maternal nutrition may impact fecundity, associations between preconception micronutrients and time to pregnancy (TTP) has not been examined. We assessed the relationship between preconception fat-soluble micronutrient concentrations and TTP among women with 1–2 prior pregnancy losses. This is a prospective cohort study of 1,228 women set in the EAGeR Trial (US, 2007–2011), which assessed the effect of preconception-initiated daily low dose aspirin on reproductive outcomes. We measured preconception zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, lycopene, α- and β-carotene, and α- and γ-tocopherol in serum. We used discrete Cox regression models, accounting for left truncation and right censoring, to calculate fecundability odds ratios (FOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Models were adjusted for age, body mass index, race, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, income, vitamin use, cholesterol, treatment arm, and study site. Serum α-carotene levels (FOR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.36, per log unit [μg/dL] increase), as well as concentrations above versus below the US average (2.92 μg/dL) were associated with shorter TTP (FOR = 1.21 95% CI: 1.02, 1.44). Compared to below the US average (187 μg/dL), γ-tocopherol concentrations above the US average were associated with longer TTP (FOR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.69, 1.00). The potential for these nutrients to influence fecundability deserves further exploration. antioxidants, carotenes, fecundability, lipophilic micronutrients, time to pregnancy, tocopherols Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2018. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

Shorter Time to Pregnancy With Increasing Preconception Carotene Concentrations Among Women With 1 to 2 Previous Pregnancy Losses

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2018.
ISSN
0002-9262
eISSN
1476-6256
D.O.I.
10.1093/aje/kwy101
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Although maternal nutrition may impact fecundity, associations between preconception micronutrients and time to pregnancy (TTP) has not been examined. We assessed the relationship between preconception fat-soluble micronutrient concentrations and TTP among women with 1–2 prior pregnancy losses. This is a prospective cohort study of 1,228 women set in the EAGeR Trial (US, 2007–2011), which assessed the effect of preconception-initiated daily low dose aspirin on reproductive outcomes. We measured preconception zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, lycopene, α- and β-carotene, and α- and γ-tocopherol in serum. We used discrete Cox regression models, accounting for left truncation and right censoring, to calculate fecundability odds ratios (FOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Models were adjusted for age, body mass index, race, smoking, alcohol, physical activity, income, vitamin use, cholesterol, treatment arm, and study site. Serum α-carotene levels (FOR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.36, per log unit [μg/dL] increase), as well as concentrations above versus below the US average (2.92 μg/dL) were associated with shorter TTP (FOR = 1.21 95% CI: 1.02, 1.44). Compared to below the US average (187 μg/dL), γ-tocopherol concentrations above the US average were associated with longer TTP (FOR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.69, 1.00). The potential for these nutrients to influence fecundability deserves further exploration. antioxidants, carotenes, fecundability, lipophilic micronutrients, time to pregnancy, tocopherols Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2018. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

Journal

American Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: May 14, 2018

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