SHARE: A New Model for Social Work

SHARE: A New Model for Social Work SHARE is presented by the authors as a co-operative endeavour, introducing a new model of humanistic, sensory social work. It is accessibly presented, including features such as cartoons produced by the English illustrator, Harry Venning, and ‘stakeholder’ vignettes from social workers. The book is engaging and would sustain interest from social work students, practitioners, managers and a wider audience interested in practice education. The SHARE model is defined as a multi-sensory approach towards effective learning, SHARE being the acronym for Seeing, Hearing, Action, Reading and Evaluation. The authors assert that the time is right for the SHARE model to emerge, as it captures the shift that is taking place within social work away from traditional, linear and individualistic models towards more complex, global and co-operative practice. The concept of ‘sharing’ is thus positioned as an intervention that recognises the inherent dignity of the people, families and communities whom social workers support and is coherent with the ethos of social work as encoded within the International Federation of Social Workers’ (IFSW, 2014) global definition of the profession. This argument resonates with much of the practice debate taking place within social work services across the UK and, as such, SHARE is both timely and a welcome addition. The opening sections introduce the reader to a series of core concepts that underpin the model, such as reciprocity, kindness, othering, anti-oppressive practice, complexity and reflexivity. The emphasis within SHARE on the social worker being an active participant within their own learning places the model within a rich tradition of social work practice education. The authors naturally guide the reader into an introduction to approaches that they argue are consistent with the model, including relational, restorative, systemic, holistic and strengths-based practice. As a practice education resource, the section is brought to a natural conclusion with a sense-making chapter on adult learning theory, which seeks to present the opportunity through the SHARE model to make explicit the connection between social work practice and education. The middle section presents each of the five elements of SHARE, with each element treated through a dedicated chapter. There is emphasis given by authors on the Seeing and Hearing elements of the model; however, they remain consistent in arguing for a multi-sensory application for SHARE to be effective as an intervention. The stakeholder vignettes within the chapters act as worked examples of sharing that helpfully evidence to the reader the potential impact of the model. Each chapter also includes Key Messages sections, which include helpful references to the peer-reviewed evidence base for those who want to explore further. The final chapter discusses the application of the SHARE model, explicitly contrasting the approach with traditional linear models that underpin the care-management cycle of assessment, support plan/intervention, review. Touching on aspects of perceptions of risk and defensible decision making, the authors at this late stage begin to open up an argument that would have potentially benefitted from earlier positioning with their discussion—that of shared and co-operative ownership of risk through co-operative, shared construction of risk between the person and the social worker. SHARE would be an extremely useful resource for newly qualified social workers who are being supported to transition from student into autonomous professional practitioner. It provides a positive introduction to key debates and a fun and very accessible set of resources to support consolidation of reflection and learning practice. Reference Internal Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) ( 2014) Global Definition of Social Work, available online at: http://ifsw.org/get-involved/global-definition-of-social-work/ (last accessed 27 February 2018). © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The British Association of Social Workers. All rights reserved. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The British Journal of Social Work Oxford University Press

SHARE: A New Model for Social Work

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/share-a-new-model-for-social-work-pT0lY0QQIz
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The British Association of Social Workers. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0045-3102
eISSN
1468-263X
D.O.I.
10.1093/bjsw/bcy019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SHARE is presented by the authors as a co-operative endeavour, introducing a new model of humanistic, sensory social work. It is accessibly presented, including features such as cartoons produced by the English illustrator, Harry Venning, and ‘stakeholder’ vignettes from social workers. The book is engaging and would sustain interest from social work students, practitioners, managers and a wider audience interested in practice education. The SHARE model is defined as a multi-sensory approach towards effective learning, SHARE being the acronym for Seeing, Hearing, Action, Reading and Evaluation. The authors assert that the time is right for the SHARE model to emerge, as it captures the shift that is taking place within social work away from traditional, linear and individualistic models towards more complex, global and co-operative practice. The concept of ‘sharing’ is thus positioned as an intervention that recognises the inherent dignity of the people, families and communities whom social workers support and is coherent with the ethos of social work as encoded within the International Federation of Social Workers’ (IFSW, 2014) global definition of the profession. This argument resonates with much of the practice debate taking place within social work services across the UK and, as such, SHARE is both timely and a welcome addition. The opening sections introduce the reader to a series of core concepts that underpin the model, such as reciprocity, kindness, othering, anti-oppressive practice, complexity and reflexivity. The emphasis within SHARE on the social worker being an active participant within their own learning places the model within a rich tradition of social work practice education. The authors naturally guide the reader into an introduction to approaches that they argue are consistent with the model, including relational, restorative, systemic, holistic and strengths-based practice. As a practice education resource, the section is brought to a natural conclusion with a sense-making chapter on adult learning theory, which seeks to present the opportunity through the SHARE model to make explicit the connection between social work practice and education. The middle section presents each of the five elements of SHARE, with each element treated through a dedicated chapter. There is emphasis given by authors on the Seeing and Hearing elements of the model; however, they remain consistent in arguing for a multi-sensory application for SHARE to be effective as an intervention. The stakeholder vignettes within the chapters act as worked examples of sharing that helpfully evidence to the reader the potential impact of the model. Each chapter also includes Key Messages sections, which include helpful references to the peer-reviewed evidence base for those who want to explore further. The final chapter discusses the application of the SHARE model, explicitly contrasting the approach with traditional linear models that underpin the care-management cycle of assessment, support plan/intervention, review. Touching on aspects of perceptions of risk and defensible decision making, the authors at this late stage begin to open up an argument that would have potentially benefitted from earlier positioning with their discussion—that of shared and co-operative ownership of risk through co-operative, shared construction of risk between the person and the social worker. SHARE would be an extremely useful resource for newly qualified social workers who are being supported to transition from student into autonomous professional practitioner. It provides a positive introduction to key debates and a fun and very accessible set of resources to support consolidation of reflection and learning practice. Reference Internal Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) ( 2014) Global Definition of Social Work, available online at: http://ifsw.org/get-involved/global-definition-of-social-work/ (last accessed 27 February 2018). © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The British Association of Social Workers. All rights reserved. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

The British Journal of Social WorkOxford University Press

Published: Mar 29, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off