Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Roles of IL-22 in allergic airway inflammation in mice and humans

Roles of IL-22 in allergic airway inflammation in mice and humans Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and airway remodeling that leads to airway obstruction. Although these pathognomonic features of asthma are primarily mediated by allergen-specific T helper type 2 cells (Th2 cells) and their cytokines, recent studies have revealed critical roles of lung epithelial cells in the pathogenesis of asthma. Lung epithelial cells not only form physical barriers by covering the surfaces of the airways but also sense inhaled allergens and initiate communication between the environment and the immune system. The causative involvement of lung epithelium in the pathogenesis of asthma suggests that some molecules that modulate epithelial function have a regulatory role in asthma. IL-22, an IL-10-family cytokine produced by IL-17A-producing T helper cells (Th17 cells), γδ T cells and group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s), primarily targets epithelial cells and promotes their proliferation. In addition, IL-22 has been shown to induce epithelial production of various molecules that regulate local immune responses. These findings indicate that IL-22 plays crucial roles in the pathogenesis of asthma by regulating epithelial function. Here, we review the current understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying IL-22-mediated regulation of airway inflammation in asthma. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Immunology Oxford University Press

Roles of IL-22 in allergic airway inflammation in mice and humans

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/roles-of-il-22-in-allergic-airway-inflammation-in-mice-and-humans-JMHAeTryvp
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society for Immunology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0953-8178
eISSN
1460-2377
DOI
10.1093/intimm/dxy010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and airway remodeling that leads to airway obstruction. Although these pathognomonic features of asthma are primarily mediated by allergen-specific T helper type 2 cells (Th2 cells) and their cytokines, recent studies have revealed critical roles of lung epithelial cells in the pathogenesis of asthma. Lung epithelial cells not only form physical barriers by covering the surfaces of the airways but also sense inhaled allergens and initiate communication between the environment and the immune system. The causative involvement of lung epithelium in the pathogenesis of asthma suggests that some molecules that modulate epithelial function have a regulatory role in asthma. IL-22, an IL-10-family cytokine produced by IL-17A-producing T helper cells (Th17 cells), γδ T cells and group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s), primarily targets epithelial cells and promotes their proliferation. In addition, IL-22 has been shown to induce epithelial production of various molecules that regulate local immune responses. These findings indicate that IL-22 plays crucial roles in the pathogenesis of asthma by regulating epithelial function. Here, we review the current understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying IL-22-mediated regulation of airway inflammation in asthma.

Journal

International ImmunologyOxford University Press

Published: Jan 31, 2018

Keywords: epithelial cells; ILC3; T h 17 cells

References