Response to “Rapid Nicotine Ratio and Successful Quitting: Acceptable Explanation” by the Authors of “Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR) Prospectively Predicts Smoking Relapse: Longitudinal Findings from ITC Surveys in Five Countries”

Response to “Rapid Nicotine Ratio and Successful Quitting: Acceptable Explanation” by the... Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 2018, 909 doi:10.1093/ntr/ntx213 Letter Letter Response to “Rapid Nicotine Ratio and Successful Quitting: Acceptable Explanation” by the Authors of “Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR) Prospectively Predicts Smoking Relapse: Longitudinal Findings from ITC Surveys in Five Countries” 1 1 2 Brian V. Fix MA , Richard J. O’Connor PhD , Bryan W. Heckman PhD , 3 2 4 Neal Benowitz MD , Michael K. Cummings PhD, MPH , Geoffrey T. Fong PhD , James F. Thrasher PhD, MA, MS 1 2 Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo NY; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 3 4 Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston SC; UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco CA; Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada; Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Department of Tobacco Research, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico Corresponding Author: Brian V. Fix, MA, Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA. Telephone: 716-845-1157; Fax: 716-845-1265; E-mail: brian.fix@roswellpark.org Dr Kawada’s letter raised concerns about our manuscript titled: findings call for a larger international study that would collect bio - “Nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) prospectively predicts smoking marker data to verify smoking status at follow-up and also take into relapse: Longitudinal findings from ITC surveys in five countries.” account multiple risk factors (biological/psychosocial/environmen- These are reasonable criticisms, several of which were acknowledged tal) across multiple countries. in the discussion section of the manuscript. We do not have data adequate to address the main points raised in the letter having to Declaration of Interests do with sample size, salivary cotinine measurement at follow-up, and information on alcohol consumption. We encourage others None declared. to attempt to replicate the findings and address limitations noted, especially since our results were opposite of what the hypothesized association was to be. The Population Assessment of Tobacco and References Health (PATH) Study has a large representative cohort of US smok- 1. Kawada T. Rapid nicotine metabolite ratio and successful quitting: accept- ers, including biomarker data, which could be used to address many able explanation. Nicotine Tob Res. 2018;20(7):908. of the limitations in our study. We hope that researchers will use 2. Fix BV, O’Connor RJ, Benowitz N, et al. Nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) these data to examine whether the findings observed and reported prospectively predicts smoking relapse: longitudinal findings from ITC in our paper were an aberration or real. Additionally, these unique Surveys in five countries. Nicotine Tob Res. 2017;19(9):1040–1047. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. 909 For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ntr/article-abstract/20/7/909/4379809 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 21 June 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nicotine and Tobacco Research Oxford University Press

Response to “Rapid Nicotine Ratio and Successful Quitting: Acceptable Explanation” by the Authors of “Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR) Prospectively Predicts Smoking Relapse: Longitudinal Findings from ITC Surveys in Five Countries”

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Oxford University Press
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© The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
1462-2203
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1469-994X
D.O.I.
10.1093/ntr/ntx213
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Abstract

Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 2018, 909 doi:10.1093/ntr/ntx213 Letter Letter Response to “Rapid Nicotine Ratio and Successful Quitting: Acceptable Explanation” by the Authors of “Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR) Prospectively Predicts Smoking Relapse: Longitudinal Findings from ITC Surveys in Five Countries” 1 1 2 Brian V. Fix MA , Richard J. O’Connor PhD , Bryan W. Heckman PhD , 3 2 4 Neal Benowitz MD , Michael K. Cummings PhD, MPH , Geoffrey T. Fong PhD , James F. Thrasher PhD, MA, MS 1 2 Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo NY; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 3 4 Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston SC; UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco CA; Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada; Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Department of Tobacco Research, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico Corresponding Author: Brian V. Fix, MA, Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA. Telephone: 716-845-1157; Fax: 716-845-1265; E-mail: brian.fix@roswellpark.org Dr Kawada’s letter raised concerns about our manuscript titled: findings call for a larger international study that would collect bio - “Nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) prospectively predicts smoking marker data to verify smoking status at follow-up and also take into relapse: Longitudinal findings from ITC surveys in five countries.” account multiple risk factors (biological/psychosocial/environmen- These are reasonable criticisms, several of which were acknowledged tal) across multiple countries. in the discussion section of the manuscript. We do not have data adequate to address the main points raised in the letter having to Declaration of Interests do with sample size, salivary cotinine measurement at follow-up, and information on alcohol consumption. We encourage others None declared. to attempt to replicate the findings and address limitations noted, especially since our results were opposite of what the hypothesized association was to be. The Population Assessment of Tobacco and References Health (PATH) Study has a large representative cohort of US smok- 1. Kawada T. Rapid nicotine metabolite ratio and successful quitting: accept- ers, including biomarker data, which could be used to address many able explanation. Nicotine Tob Res. 2018;20(7):908. of the limitations in our study. We hope that researchers will use 2. Fix BV, O’Connor RJ, Benowitz N, et al. Nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) these data to examine whether the findings observed and reported prospectively predicts smoking relapse: longitudinal findings from ITC in our paper were an aberration or real. Additionally, these unique Surveys in five countries. Nicotine Tob Res. 2017;19(9):1040–1047. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. 909 For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ntr/article-abstract/20/7/909/4379809 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 21 June 2018

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Nicotine and Tobacco ResearchOxford University Press

Published: Oct 9, 2017

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