Response to Letter to the Editor: “Androgens, Irregular Menses, and Risk of Diabetes and Coronary Artery Calcification in the Diabetes Prevention Program”

Response to Letter to the Editor: “Androgens, Irregular Menses, and Risk of Diabetes and... LETT ER T O TH E E DI TOR - R E S P ONS E Response to Letter to the Editor: “Androgens, Irregular Menses, and Risk of Diabetes and Coronary Artery Calcification in the Diabetes Prevention Program” 1,2,3 4 5 6 Catherine Kim, Vanita R. Aroda, Ronald B. Goldberg, Naji Younes, 6 7 8 Sharon L. Edelstein, Mary Lou Carrion-Petersen, and David A. Ehrmann, for the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study Group 1 2 Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Endocrinology Division, Boston, Massachusetts 02115; Department of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida 6 7 33136; Biostatistics Center, George Washington University, Rockville, Maryland 20852; Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093; and Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Ilinois 60637 Coordinating Center, George Washington University Bio- hank you for the comment noting a potential role for statistics Center, 6110 Executive Boulevard, Suite 750, Rockville, Tdehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS) in miti- Maryland 20852. E-mail: dppmail@bsc.gwu.edu. gating diabetes risk. Previous analyses in the Diabetes Prevention Program have examined the relationship between DHEAS and incident diabetes (1, 2), before and References after adjustment for risk factors, including age. No as- sociation was seen before or after adjustment. It is pos- 1. Kim C, Kong S, Laughlin GA, Golden SH, Mather KJ, Nan B, Edelstein SL, Randolph JF Jr, Labrie F, Buschur E, Barrett-Connor E. sible that DHEAS is associated with lower diabetes risk in Endogenous sex hormone changes in postmenopausal women in the populations with a wider range of body mass indices and diabetes prevention program. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012;97(8): levels of glucose tolerance. As for the role of DHEAS 2853–2861. 2. Mather KJ, Kim C, Christophi CA, Aroda VR, Knowler WC, therapy, several randomized trials have not demonstrated Edelstein SE, Florez JC, Labrie F, Kahn SE, Goldberg RB, Barrett- noteworthy effects with DHEAS supplementation (3). It Connor E; Diabetes Prevention Program. Steroid sex hormones, sex is possible that exogenous DHEAS concentrations have hormone binding globulin, and diabetes incidence in the Diabetes Prevention Program. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015;100(10): different metabolic effects than DHEAS produced by the 3778–3786. adrenal glands. 3. Elraiyah T, Sonbol M, Khairalseed T, Asi N, Undavalli C, Nabhan M, Altayar O, Prokop L, Montori V, Murad M. Clinical review: Acknowledgments the benefits and harms of systemic DHEA in postmeno- pausal women with normal adrenal function: a systemic review Correspondence and Reprint Requests: Catherine Kim, MD, and meta-analysis. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014;99(10): MPH, c/o the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study 3536–3542. ISSN Print 0021-972X ISSN Online 1945-7197 Abbreviation: DHEAS, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate. Printed in USA Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society Received 30 January 2018. Accepted 4 February 2018. First Published Online 12 March 2018 2068 https://academic.oup.com/jcem J Clin Endocrinol Metab, May 2018, 103(5):2068 doi: 10.1210/jc.2018-00244 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-abstract/103/5/2068/4931069 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 20 June 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Oxford University Press

Response to Letter to the Editor: “Androgens, Irregular Menses, and Risk of Diabetes and Coronary Artery Calcification in the Diabetes Prevention Program”

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Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society
ISSN
0021-972X
eISSN
1945-7197
D.O.I.
10.1210/jc.2018-00244
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Abstract

LETT ER T O TH E E DI TOR - R E S P ONS E Response to Letter to the Editor: “Androgens, Irregular Menses, and Risk of Diabetes and Coronary Artery Calcification in the Diabetes Prevention Program” 1,2,3 4 5 6 Catherine Kim, Vanita R. Aroda, Ronald B. Goldberg, Naji Younes, 6 7 8 Sharon L. Edelstein, Mary Lou Carrion-Petersen, and David A. Ehrmann, for the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study Group 1 2 Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Endocrinology Division, Boston, Massachusetts 02115; Department of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida 6 7 33136; Biostatistics Center, George Washington University, Rockville, Maryland 20852; Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093; and Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Ilinois 60637 Coordinating Center, George Washington University Bio- hank you for the comment noting a potential role for statistics Center, 6110 Executive Boulevard, Suite 750, Rockville, Tdehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS) in miti- Maryland 20852. E-mail: dppmail@bsc.gwu.edu. gating diabetes risk. Previous analyses in the Diabetes Prevention Program have examined the relationship between DHEAS and incident diabetes (1, 2), before and References after adjustment for risk factors, including age. No as- sociation was seen before or after adjustment. It is pos- 1. Kim C, Kong S, Laughlin GA, Golden SH, Mather KJ, Nan B, Edelstein SL, Randolph JF Jr, Labrie F, Buschur E, Barrett-Connor E. sible that DHEAS is associated with lower diabetes risk in Endogenous sex hormone changes in postmenopausal women in the populations with a wider range of body mass indices and diabetes prevention program. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012;97(8): levels of glucose tolerance. As for the role of DHEAS 2853–2861. 2. Mather KJ, Kim C, Christophi CA, Aroda VR, Knowler WC, therapy, several randomized trials have not demonstrated Edelstein SE, Florez JC, Labrie F, Kahn SE, Goldberg RB, Barrett- noteworthy effects with DHEAS supplementation (3). It Connor E; Diabetes Prevention Program. Steroid sex hormones, sex is possible that exogenous DHEAS concentrations have hormone binding globulin, and diabetes incidence in the Diabetes Prevention Program. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015;100(10): different metabolic effects than DHEAS produced by the 3778–3786. adrenal glands. 3. Elraiyah T, Sonbol M, Khairalseed T, Asi N, Undavalli C, Nabhan M, Altayar O, Prokop L, Montori V, Murad M. Clinical review: Acknowledgments the benefits and harms of systemic DHEA in postmeno- pausal women with normal adrenal function: a systemic review Correspondence and Reprint Requests: Catherine Kim, MD, and meta-analysis. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014;99(10): MPH, c/o the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study 3536–3542. ISSN Print 0021-972X ISSN Online 1945-7197 Abbreviation: DHEAS, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate. Printed in USA Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society Received 30 January 2018. Accepted 4 February 2018. First Published Online 12 March 2018 2068 https://academic.oup.com/jcem J Clin Endocrinol Metab, May 2018, 103(5):2068 doi: 10.1210/jc.2018-00244 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-abstract/103/5/2068/4931069 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 20 June 2018

Journal

Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and MetabolismOxford University Press

Published: Mar 12, 2018

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