Response to Le Bourg

Response to Le Bourg Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences cite as: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2018, Vol. 73, No. 3, 310 doi:10.1093/gerona/glx173 Advance Access publication December 28, 2017 Letter to the Editor 1, 2 Julie A. Mattison PhD * and Ricki J. Colman PhD 1 2 National Institute on Aging, Translational Gerontology Branch, Baltimore, Maryland. Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison. *Address correspondence to: Julie A. Mattison, National Institute on Aging, Translational Gerontology Branch, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Ste 100, Baltimore, Maryland 21224. E-mail: julie.mattison@nih.gov Dear Editor, national records of mortality for rhesus monkeys in captivity, where In response to the letter from our colleague Eric Le Bourg, we would median lifespan is ~26 years of age (3). We would also point out that like to convey the following: The purpose of the Vaughan et al. within both studies, the nutritional content of the diet was the same article was not to explain why the two NHP diet restriction (DR) for Control and DR monkeys: DR monkeys did not receive a better studies reached different survival conclusions; that explanation was diet, just less of the same. provided in Mattison et al. (1). Rather, Vaughan et al. point out fac- In conclusion, the NHP studies reveal the complex interactions tors that contribute to disparate outcomes among DR studies where among diet composition, restriction, health span and survival and the impact on longevity is not “universal”, as reported by Mitchell confirm the utility of the DR paradigm as a means to understand et al. (2). aging. It is important that the differences in the NHP studies are not Sincerely, misinterpreted. There are a few factual errors in Le Bourg’s repre- sentation of these studies. Le Bourg singles out that the WI control References animals were fed ad libitum versus a portioned amount at NIA. In 1. Mattison JA, Colman RJ, Beasley TM, et al. Caloric restriction improves fact, at both sites, the control monkeys were portioned and none health and survival of rhesus monkeys. Nat Commun. 2017;8:14063. were ad libitum fed. Mattison et  al. (1) acknowledge that there is doi:10.1038/ncomms14063 something uniquely different about the NIA male monkeys started 2. Mitchell SJ, Madrigal-Matute J, Scheibye-Knudsen M, et  al. Effects of on the DR study later in life (>15 years); these animals are excep- sex, strain, and energy intake on Hallmarks of aging in mice. Cell Metab. tionally long-lived, with six monkeys living beyond 40  years, the 2016;23:1093–1112. doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2016.05.027 previously reported maximum lifespan. Le Bourg uses the ages of 3. Colman RJ, Beasley TM, Kemnitz JW, Johnson SC, Weindruch R, these monkeys to draw the conclusion that the WI control monkeys Anderson RM. Caloric restriction reduces age-related and all-cause were short-lived. In fact, for both males and females, survival of the mortality in rhesus monkeys. Nat Commun. 2014;5:3557. doi:10.1038/ ncomms4557 WI controls, and the younger-onset NIA monkeys is comparable to Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/article-abstract/73/3/310/4781453 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 22 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical Sciences Oxford University Press

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
ISSN
1079-5006
eISSN
1758-535X
D.O.I.
10.1093/gerona/glx173
Publisher site
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Abstract

Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences cite as: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2018, Vol. 73, No. 3, 310 doi:10.1093/gerona/glx173 Advance Access publication December 28, 2017 Letter to the Editor 1, 2 Julie A. Mattison PhD * and Ricki J. Colman PhD 1 2 National Institute on Aging, Translational Gerontology Branch, Baltimore, Maryland. Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison. *Address correspondence to: Julie A. Mattison, National Institute on Aging, Translational Gerontology Branch, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Ste 100, Baltimore, Maryland 21224. E-mail: julie.mattison@nih.gov Dear Editor, national records of mortality for rhesus monkeys in captivity, where In response to the letter from our colleague Eric Le Bourg, we would median lifespan is ~26 years of age (3). We would also point out that like to convey the following: The purpose of the Vaughan et al. within both studies, the nutritional content of the diet was the same article was not to explain why the two NHP diet restriction (DR) for Control and DR monkeys: DR monkeys did not receive a better studies reached different survival conclusions; that explanation was diet, just less of the same. provided in Mattison et al. (1). Rather, Vaughan et al. point out fac- In conclusion, the NHP studies reveal the complex interactions tors that contribute to disparate outcomes among DR studies where among diet composition, restriction, health span and survival and the impact on longevity is not “universal”, as reported by Mitchell confirm the utility of the DR paradigm as a means to understand et al. (2). aging. It is important that the differences in the NHP studies are not Sincerely, misinterpreted. There are a few factual errors in Le Bourg’s repre- sentation of these studies. Le Bourg singles out that the WI control References animals were fed ad libitum versus a portioned amount at NIA. In 1. Mattison JA, Colman RJ, Beasley TM, et al. Caloric restriction improves fact, at both sites, the control monkeys were portioned and none health and survival of rhesus monkeys. Nat Commun. 2017;8:14063. were ad libitum fed. Mattison et  al. (1) acknowledge that there is doi:10.1038/ncomms14063 something uniquely different about the NIA male monkeys started 2. Mitchell SJ, Madrigal-Matute J, Scheibye-Knudsen M, et  al. Effects of on the DR study later in life (>15 years); these animals are excep- sex, strain, and energy intake on Hallmarks of aging in mice. Cell Metab. tionally long-lived, with six monkeys living beyond 40  years, the 2016;23:1093–1112. doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2016.05.027 previously reported maximum lifespan. Le Bourg uses the ages of 3. Colman RJ, Beasley TM, Kemnitz JW, Johnson SC, Weindruch R, these monkeys to draw the conclusion that the WI control monkeys Anderson RM. Caloric restriction reduces age-related and all-cause were short-lived. In fact, for both males and females, survival of the mortality in rhesus monkeys. Nat Commun. 2014;5:3557. doi:10.1038/ ncomms4557 WI controls, and the younger-onset NIA monkeys is comparable to Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/article-abstract/73/3/310/4781453 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 22 March 2018

Journal

The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical SciencesOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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