Renal involvement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Renal involvement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia Clinical Kidney Journal, 2018, 1–11 doi: 10.1093/ckj/sfy026 CKJ Review CK J R E V I E W 1 2 2,3 Rimda Wanchoo , Carolina Bernabe Ramirez , Jacqueline Barrientos and Kenar D. Jhaveri Division of Kidney Diseases and Hypertension, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Great Neck, NY, USA, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Lake Success, NY, USA and CLL Research and Treatment Program, Lake Success, NY, USA Correspondence and offprint requests to: Rimda Wanchoo; E-mail: Rwanchoo1@northwell.edu; Twitter handle: @renalmyeloma ABSTRACT Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most commonly diagnosed adult leukemia in the USA and Western Europe. Kidney disease can present in patients with CLL as a manifestation of the disease process such as acute kidney injury with infiltration or with a paraneoplastic glomerular disease or as a manifestation of extra renal obstruction and tumor lysis syndrome. In the current era of novel targeted therapies, kidney disease can also present as a complication of treatment. Tumor lysis syndrome associated with novel agents such as the B-cell lymphoma 2 inhibitor venetoclax and the monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab are important nephrotoxicities associated with these agents. Here we review the various forms of kidney diseases associated with CLL and its therapies. Keywords: AKI, CLL, infiltration, leukemia, onconephrology, paraproteinemia, venetoclax INTRODUCTION requiring transfusion support, life-threatening infections or se- Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most commonly vere organ damage. diagnosed adult leukemia in the USA and Western Europe. Reports published between 1966 and 1973 constituted the Approximately 20 000 new CLL cases are expected to be diag- basis on which Rai et al. [4] developed a system of staging of CLL nosed in the USA in 2017 [1]. The disease affects primarily the that could prospectively distinguish patients according to their elderly, with the majority of patients being diagnosed at a rela- overall outlook for survival (Table 1). This method of staging tive older age (>65 years). The disease is usually monitored con- was recognized as a simple, yet accurate prognostic tool for esti- servatively until disease-related symptoms develop. Most mating survival and received wide acceptance by clinicians. In common manifestations of CLL that require initiation of ther- the current era, genetic and protein markers are also used to apy include fevers, night sweats, weight loss, organomegaly or characterize CLL. Important characteristics of CLL cells are the lymphadenopathy causing discomfort and bone marrow failure presence of the immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (IGHV) (evidenced by worsening anemia or thrombocytopenia) [2, 3]. Unfortunately, by the time most patients require therapy, pa- gene repertoire and expression of stereotyped B-cell receptors [5, 6]. Approximately half of CLL clones will demonstrate unmu- tients have acquired chronic comorbidities that limit their tated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions, a finding performance status and ability to tolerate therapy. Hence pa- tients may become too frail to tolerate a regimen that may be associated with shorter overall survival and a higher risk of re- associated with severe toxicities such as myelosuppression lapse following chemoimmunotherapy. In addition, the Received: 22.12.2017. Editorial decision: 26.2.2018 V C The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 2| R. Wanchoo et al. Table 1. Rai staging of CLL Median survival Risk status Stage Description (months) (modified Rai) 0 Lymphocytosis, lymphocytes in blood >15 000 lymphocytes/mm and 40% 140 Low lymphocytes in bone marrow I Stage 0 with enlarged lymph node(s) 100 Intermediate II Stages 0–I with hepatomegaly, splenomegaly or both 70 Intermediate III Stages 0–II with hemoglobin <11 g/dL or hematocrit <33% 20 High IV Stages 0–III with platelets <100 000/lL 20 High Adapted from the National Cancer Institute guidelines and Rai et al. [4]. presence of CD38 appears to be independently associated with Table 2. Summary of various causes of kidney injury in patients an adverse prognosis [5, 6]. Zeta chain–associated protein 70 with CLL (ZAP70), a tyrosine kinase normally expressed by natural killer Type of etiology Potential causes and T cells, is required for normal T-cell receptor signaling. ZAP70 is not normally expressed in B lymphocytes but has been Prerenal Poor oral intake; sepsis and hypoperfusion; found in a subset of patients with CLL and appears to correlate heart failure; cirrhosis; medications such as with survival [5, 6]. Specific cytogenetic abnormalities identified diuretics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and abnor- agents, angiotensin receptor blockers and malities in certain genes identified by molecular genetic testing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors confer prognostic significance in patients with CLL. Of these, Intrinsic renal Glomerular diseases TMA del(13q) and trisomy 12 are favorable prognostic findings. Acute tubular necrosis—sepsis, nephrotoxic Historically, patients with del(17p) or del(11q) have been at high agents and in some cases hyperviscosity and risk of either not responding to initial treatment or relapsing therapy agents soon after achieving remission [5, 6]. Acute interstitial nephritis—infections such as BK or adenovirus, urinary tract infections, KIDNEY DISEASES WITH CLL medication or chemotherapy induced or ma- lignant cell infiltration Kidney disease in patients with CLL may impact survival and Postrenal Obstruction from extrinsic compression of pelva- occurs through diverse mechanisms such as leukemic infiltra- calcyceal system by tumor or lymph nodes tion, extrarenal obstruction, tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), glom- TLS—uric acid nephropathy and intratubular ob- erular diseases, electrolyte disorders and medication side struction from cancer itself or related to the effects. Here we review the kidney diseases associated with CLL use of CLL-directed therapy and its treatments. Strati and Shanafelt [7] found a 7.5% incidence of kidney disease at diagnosis in a cohort of >2000 patients with CLL at the Mayo Clinic. Renal insufficiency at baseline was associated intensive care unit demonstrated some form of AKI in >40% pa- with male gender, older age, more advanced disease and tients. Of those, 29% required renal replacement therapy, with CLL CD49d positivity; these patients were less likely to receive an astounding mortality rate of 72%. The etiology of AKI that purine nucleoside analogue therapy and were more likely to occurs in most hematologic malignancies, including CLL, are di- receive single alkylator-based therapy. Acute kidney injury verse [9]. One study of patients of all hematologic malignancies (AKI) developed in 16% of patients during follow-up and noted that the most common causes of AKI were hypoperfu- was associated with older age, male gender and certain CLL þ þ þ  sion, TLS, hemophagocytic syndrome, direct infiltration of ma- characteristics (IGHV UM, CD49d ,CD38 ,ZAP-70 ,del17p ,or lignant cells and infections [10]. Another study found the most del11q )[7]. A study from the Mayo Clinic found that the pres- common cause of AKI in hematologic malignancies was prere- ence of kidney disease is independently associated with ad- nal azotemia [11]. Based on our experience, prerenal azotemia, verse patient outcomes in CLL. Kidney disease at diagnosis of acute tubular necrosis, TLS from chemotherapy agents and CLL or during follow-up had a significantly decreased overall infiltrative disease are the common causes of AKI in CLL. survival compared with those without kidney disease [8]. Thus Table 2 summarizes the etiologies causing AKI in patients with the presence of kidney disease in patients with CLL affects CLL. patient treatment strategies, clinical trial candidacy and out- comes. Due to the fact that CLL usually follows an indolent course, patients with CLL rarely undergo kidney biopsy. In the Renal infiltration and obstruction studybyStrati et al.[8], of all the CLL patients studied, only The infiltration of extramedullary organs can occur in CLL, but 1.2% of patients underwent kidney biopsy. The low rate of this complication is typically unusual. Postmortem retrospect- kidney biopsy is a limiting factor in our understanding of CLL- ive series and case reports have demonstrated an infiltration of associated kidney disease. monoclonal B cells in the kidneys of patients that developed AKI before their demise. Autopsy studies show that 60–90% of AKI in CLL patients may have leukemic-cell infiltration in the kidneys but, AKI in patients with leukemia is common. A study looking at even at late stages, kidney function may remain unimpaired >300 patients with hematologic malignancies admitted to an [12, 13]. This clinical phenotype has been linked to a more Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 The Kidney in CLL | 3 FIGURE 1: The renal parenchyma is infiltrated by monomorphic lymphocytes with an immunotype characteristic of CLL/small lymphocytic lymphoma. Immunohistochemistry stains reveal strongly positive B-cell marker CD20, negative T-cell marker CD3 and aberrantly expressed T-cell marker CD5. aggressive or advanced Rai stage. A retrospective study by nephromegaly, which can affect one or both kidneys and results Poitou-Verkinder et al.[14] identified 15 patients afflicted with from diffuse or nodular parenchymal infiltration by leukemic CLL from a repository of 3950 kidney biopsies. Pathology cells [17, 18]. The sensitivity and specificity of this finding are showed that CLL monoclonal infiltrates were present in 10 of not known. For example, one series found that only 1 of 10 pa- the biopsies; 9 patients had glomerulopathies, with membrano- tients with biopsy-proven renal infiltration had increased kid- proliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) being the most com- ney size [14]. Other abnormalities include single or multiple monly reported histologic form. A large Mayo Clinic study that nodules and wedge-shaped or geographic areas that enhance included patients with both CLL and monoclonal B-cell lympho- less than the adjacent normal renal parenchyma after intraven- cytosis had a kidney biopsy if they presented with nephrotic ous contrast agent administration [17, 18]. No specific studies syndrome or renal insufficiency. Of 4012 patients with CLL, only have investigated how changes in imaging correlate as kidney 49 (1.2% of all patients) had pathological findings of CLL (infiltra- function improves or worsens with CLL. tion and glomerular diseases) in their kidneys [8]. This is in Obstructive nephropathy in the setting of CLL can be striking contrast to autopsy studies done in the 1980s [12, 13]. observed and is diagnosed radiographically via ultrasound, MRI Interestingly, the pattern or extent of infiltration did not correl- or CT scan. Bilateral hydronephrosis from obstructing nodes ate with the degree of AKI [8]. Another review of the literature is managed with decompression and treating the underlying found 17 reports of patients with kidney biopsies showing renal CLL [16]. infiltration by CLL in addition to other histologic findings, with no association found between the absolute lymphocyte count and CLL renal infiltration [15]. Kidney function has been noted Other interstitial diseases to improve with CLL treatment in many patients with infiltra- Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (non-infection related) in tive disease on biopsy [14]. Figure 1 shows a case of AKI with the setting of CLL has been described in case reports and small CLL infiltrative disease. case series [19], with partial recovery in 90% of the patients with The mechanism of AKI with CLL infiltration is not clearly CLL treatment. BK virus nephropathy in the native kidneys has established but has been hypothesized to involve tubular/ also been reported with CLL [15, 20]. microvascular compression causing intrarenal obstruction in addition to an infiltration-associated inflammatory/cytokine re- sponse [12, 16]. The radiology literature also describes the use of Glomerular diseases multidetector row computed tomography (CT), magnetic reson- Several glomerular diseases have been associated with CLL, ance imaging (MRI), positive emission tomography and ultra- with >50 cases mentioned via case reports and case series. The sound to identify CLL involvement of the kidney, but these most frequently reported findings are MPGN (36%) and mem- studies do not include histologic correlation. In general, when branous nephropathy (19%). While specific percentages are not kidney involvement is detected at imaging, there is also evi- available, a large number of cases exist of CLL with amyloidosis dence of extramedullary involvement in other sites. The most common imaging pattern of kidney involvement in leukemia is as well. Other rare findings are minimal change disease (MCD), Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 4| R. Wanchoo et al. FIGURE 2: A glomerulus with a membranoproliferative pattern of injury. There is marked mesangial expansion by matrix and cells, thickened and remodeled capillary walls and frequent inflammatory cells in the glomerular capillary lumens. By immunofluorescence microscopy, this lesion reveals IgG-kappa restricted reactivity. Lambda light chain is completely negative. immunotactoid glomerulopathy and focal segmental glomeru- hematologic malignancy and resolution of the glomerular dis- losclerosis [8, 14]. eases with chemotherapy strongly suggests an immune-medi- Paraprotein-mediated kidney disease has been well ated mechanism. Interestingly, MCD was described in a patient described in CLL, ranging from 2.5 to 60% of cases [8]. In a study with monoclonal B lymphocytosis; a precursor state of CLL [23]. from France, 6/15 patients that underwent a kidney biopsy in a Similar to monoclonal gammopathy of unclear significance that CLL cohort presented with a monoclonal dysproteinemia [14]. can lead to kidney disease, monoclonal B lymphocytosis can Abnormal serum free light chains can be detected in 30–40% also be responsible for kidney disease [24]. patients with CLL. Recent data suggest a significant correlation Membranous nephropathy is usually more common with between the abnormal free light chain ratio and outcome of CLL solid tumors [25]. CLL-associated membranous nephropathy patients [21]. The monoclonal protein secreted by the B-cell has been described and a few of them respond to chemotherapy clone can either be directly involved in the pathogenesis of the of CLL [8]. The cases described were prior to the discovery of the lesions, as in cases of fibrillary glomerulopathy, immunotactoid M-type phospholipase A2 receptor on podocytes that has been nephropathy, amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis or type I/II associated with primary membranous nephropathy [26]. Systemic amyloidosis has been associated with CLL. A large cyroglobulinemia or indirectly in cases of MPGN not related to study from the Mayo Clinic reviewed all cases of CLL and amyl- cyroglobulinemia [14]. Light chain cast nephropathy has also been described in patients with CLL [8]. oidosis [27]. Over a span of 20 years, 33 patients were identified, By far the most common glomerular lesion noted in CLL pa- 61% had AL amyloidosis and 39% had non-AL amyloidosis. Of tients is MPGN (Figure 2). In most studies the majority of the pa- the 18 patients with AL amyloidosis that had typing results tients had a paraproteinemia [8, 14]. Cryoglobulin-associated available, four had a CLL clone only and the remaining 14 had MPGN was also fairly common in this subgroup [8]. In cases of both a plasma cell and CLL clone. Six patients had both a fibrillary and immunotactoid glomerular diseases seen in CLL, plasma cell and CLL clone that shared the same light chain. For light microscopy findings were suggestive of MPGN, with many patients with AL amyloidosis associated with CLL, the patients patients having a circulating monoclonal protein (Figure 3). received agents that targeted B and plasma cells. The median Cases of MPGN presenting as C3 glomerulonephritis have also survival for AL amyloidosis patients with CLL was 38.9 months been reported, suggesting indirect damage via activation of the [27]. Other sporadic cases of AL amyloidosis have been reported alternative complement system [22]. with CLL and treatment is challenging, as it is not easy to de- MCD has also been reported in many cases of CLL [8, 11]. The cipher if the CLL and plasma cell dyscrasias are truly related or pathophysiology of this association is unclear. Both a B-cell- two separate entities [28–33]. mediated mechanism and T-cell dysfunction have been pro- Nine patients in the above-mentioned cohort [27] had posed. The co-development of a podocytopathy along with non-AL amyloidosis. Cases with non-AL amyloidosis that had Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 The Kidney in CLL | 5 Table 3. Summary of published cases of various glomerular diseases seen with CLL Kidney pathology reported Cases, n Reference MPGN 37 [8, 14] AL amyloidosis 24 [27–33] MCD 13 [8, 11, 23] Membranous nephropathy 12 [8] AA amyloidosis 9 [27] Proliferative GN 8 [8, 14] Thrombotic microangiopathy 6 [8] Fibrillary GN 4 [8, 14] Immunotactoid glomerulopathy 4 [8, 14] C3 GN 3 [22] FSGS 2 [8, 14] Most cases included direct deposition of monoclonal proteins in the form of proliferative glomerulonephritis, C3 deposits or cryoglobulinemia. AA, amyloid type A protein; GN, glomerulonephritis; FSGS, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. ELECTROLYTE DISORDERS FIGURE 3: Immunotactoid organized deposits within the mesangial matrix. The deposits are composed of microtubules, sometimes in a parallel arrangement. TLS TLS is the most common oncologic emergency with an inci- amyloid typing done comprised mostly the patients with the dence as high as 26% in high-grade B-cell acute lymphoblastic transthyretin (seven patients) form of amyloidosis. One patient leukemia [34]. TLS results from rapid release of the intracellular had insulin-type amyloid and she was a type 1 diabetic who contents of dying cancer cells into the bloodstream either had been on insulin for >50 years prior to diagnosis of amyloid- spontaneously or in response to cancer therapy. It is bio- osis [27]. The patients with non-AL amyloidosis with CLL chemically characterized by hyperuricemia, hyperkalemia, received no specific agents targeting plasma cell clones. The hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia. Cardiac arrhythmias, median overall survival of the non-AL amyloidosis patients was seizures and superimposed AKI are common clinical presenta- 61.4 months, much better than the AL amyloidosis patients tions (Figure 4). Table 4 summarizes the Cairo–Bishop definition with CLL [27]. of laboratory TLS and clinical TLS. This is the classic def- The high prevalence of an abnormal serum free light chain inition used in diagnosing TLS. The pathophysiology of ratio and increase in free light chains in general in patients with TLS-mediated AKI involves intratubular obstruction and inflam- CLL brings into question whether a subset of these patients mation by precipitation of crystals of uric acid, calcium phos- with CLL have undiagnosed AL amyloidosis [22]. Polyclonal B phate and/or xanthine. Preexisting kidney dysfunction favors cells share the same microenvironmental interactions as tumor intratubular crystal precipitation. Consensus recommendations cells and could themselves be activated by antigenic stimula- for TLS prophylaxis include volume expansion for all risk tion of the CLL clone. This later may in turn convey activatory groups, use of allopurinol in medium- and high-risk groups and signals to bystander B and T lymphocytes. It is possible that the use of recombinant urate oxidase (rasburicase) in high-risk tumor-derived monoclonal free light chains can be admixed groups. The utility of diuretics and urine alkalization are vari- with variable amounts of serum free light chains produced by able and their efficacy is debatable [34, 35]. non-clonal bystander B cells in the lymphohematopoietic tis- While TLS is uncommon in CLL, it is still an issue that needs sues [22]. to be addressed, particularly with the use of one of the novel Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) has been reported in targeted agents used in the treatment of CLL, namely the drug patients with CLL. In the study by Strati et al.[8], six patients venetoclax. The use of venetoclax, a recently approved B-cell presented with TMA (renal limited or systemic) as the renal lymphoma 2 protein (bcl-2) inhibitor for use in a select group of manifestation of CLL. Four of the six patients responded to patients with relapsed CLL that carry del17p (high risk of pro- treatment with CLL, one required a stem cell transplant- gression), has led to drug-induced TLS in 3–6% of patients [36]. ation and the other had simultaneous lung cancer [8]. All six pa- In order to minimize the risk of TLS, a strict protocol has been tients had clinical presentation of AKI, proteinuria, hemolysis, established that will be discussed in more detail in a later anemia, elevated lactate dehydrogenase and presence of schis- section. tocytes on peripheral smear and low haptoglobin. Other associ- ated glomerular diseases with CLL are listed below in Table 3 in Other electrolyte disorders order of incidence. Glomerular diseases associated with cancer, and in this The most common electrolyte disorder encountered in CLL case CLL, can present preceding the CLL diagnosis [25]. CLL is patients is pseudohyperkalemia. Potassium tends to stay pre- frequently not treated or treated late. If there is end organ dominantly in the intracellular compartment. Leakage of po- damage and we are able to connect the kidney disease to CLL, tassium from the intracellular compartment at the time of perhaps treatment might be important and critical for renal collection due to hemolysis, cell fragility or heparin-induced survival. The term ‘CLL with renal significance’ should be con- damage can lead to spurious elevation of measured potassium sidered for cases that present with this dilemma. levels, which is known as pseudohyperkalemia. In addition, Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 6| R. Wanchoo et al. Tumor Lysis Syndrome Uric acid release Phosphorus release Potassium release Hyperphosphatemia Hyperuricemia Hyperkalemia Calcium phosphate crystals Uric acid crystals Arrhythmias Acute kidney injury FIGURE 4: Clinical presentation summary of tumor lysis syndrome. Routine serum analysis leads to high measured potassium Table 4. Cairo–Bishop definition of laboratory TLS and clinical TLS levels due to the release of potassium from fragile leukemic Electrolyte disorder Criterion cells during the clotting process. But in CLL, even the plasma levels of potassium are elevated. Severe leukocytosis leads Potassium 6 mEq/L or 25% increase from baseline to consumption of metabolic fuels that can impair sodium- Phosphorus 4.5 mg/dL or 25% increase from baseline potassium ATPase activity, leading to release of potassium from Calcium >25% decrease from baseline a high number of white cells [43]. While in elevated platelet lev- Uric acid 8 mg/dL or 25% increase from baseline els, serum and plasma levels can differentiate pseudohyperka- lemia, elevated white cell–related pseudohyperkalemia might Clinical criteria: laboratory criteria and one or more of the following: (i) creatinine 1.5 upper limit of normal, (ii) seizures, (iii) cardiac arrhythmia not be as straightforward to distinguish. While not common, or sudden death. Laboratory TLS requires that two or more of the following another interesting electrolyte disorder noted in CLL patients is metabolic abnormalities occur within 3 days before or up to 7 days after the initi- reverse pseudohyperkalemia [44, 45], where plasma potassium ation of therapy: hyperuricemia, hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia and hypo- is noted to be higher than serum potassium [46]. The mechan- calcemia. Clinical TLS is present when laboratory TLS is accompanied by an ism is not well understood but may be due to an increase in sen- increased creatinine level, seizures, cardiac dysrhythmia or death. sitivity to heparin-mediated cell membrane damage during processing and centrifugation in a hematologic malignancy and myeloproliferative disorders and thrombocytosis can also lead mechanical stressors. To our knowledge, there is no specific to pseudohyperkalemia. Thrombocytosis (platelet count >1000 way to predict or correct the measured potassium value based 10 /L) can also lead to pseudohyperkalemia. Elevation of the on the white cell count. blood platelet count by 1000  10 /L can lead to an increase of The time to collection and analysis of the blood sample can 0.2 mmol/L in plasma potassium and 0.7 mmol/L in serum po- help eliminate some of these findings. Allowing serum to sit on tassium [37]. As a result, the potassium concentration is gener- the clot for too long (>2 h) can significantly increase the potas- ally higher in serum compared with plasma from platelets sium values. Ideally, specimens for patients with significantly during clotting. Similarly, elevated potassium levels have been elevated white cell counts should be delivered in person to min- described in leukocytosis as well. An artifactually elevated serum imize hemolysis. Arterial blood gas samples in a balanced hep- potassium level or spurious hyperkalemia was first described [38] arin syringe for potassium measurement can decrease the with extreme leukocytosis (>600  10 /L)and severalcase reports transit time to allow for more accurate potassium measure- thereafter [39–41]. Katkish et al. [42]reviewed >300 patients with ment. Venous blood gas measurements can be useful, but keep CLL listed in the tumor registry in the state of Minnesota between in mind that venous samples have more mechanical stressors 1997 and 2014. The researchers found that the adjusted odds of a compared with arterial blood draw techniques, making arterial patient’s potassium being elevated increased by 1.4 [95% confi- draws more accurate. We also recommend checking a simultan- dence interval (CI) 1.2–1.5; P < 0.0001] for every 10  10 /L increase eous plasma potassium level in patients with white cell counts in white blood cell count. Below a white blood cell count of 50 >100  10 /L. An electrocardiogram (EKG) can be helpful in dif- 10 cells/L, the median estimated percentage of a patient’s potas- ferentiating pseudohyperkalemia/reverse pseudohyperkalemia sium being elevated was 1.7%, but was considerably higher, at from true hyperkalemia. The absence of typical EKG changes is 8.1%, when the white blood cell count was 100  10 /L. This is usually helpful in identifying pseudohyperkalemia. High the first and only study to systematically look at serum potassium plasma lactate dehydrogenase levels may indicate hemolysis or values in CLL patients [42] demonstrating that the results are rupture of fragile white blood cells seen in CLL patients. related to pseudohyperkalemia. Consideration should be given to testing serum potassium if the Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 The Kidney in CLL | 7 Table 5. Summary of FDA adverse events by targeted agents used in CLL (2014–17) Agent AKI Hyponatremia Hypokalemia Hypophosphatemia Hypomagnesemia Hyperkalemia Proteinuria TLS Total Alemtuzumab 2500 0 0 0 3 133 Ofatumumab 2976 0 0 3 0 16 61 Ibrutinib 9 9 54 1 3 0 6 37 Idelalisib 4 1 2 0 0 3 0 8 18 Obinutuzumab 10 0 0 1 0 1 0 8 20 Venetoclax 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 Bold numbers suggest highest type of injury. plasma potassium is elevated in the context of leukocytosis, es- quarter of 2017) for all recently approved targeted agents for pecially if reverse pseudohyperkalemia is suspected. In add- CLL. Well-established chemotherapy agents used in CLL such as ition, we suggest placing a warning in the electronic medical cyclophosphamide and fludarabine were excluded. The adverse record to alert clinicians to potential pseudohyperkalemia in event terms queried were hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, patients with CLL and leukocytosis. Such recognition might hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, hypocalcemia, hypercalce- help prevent costly and harmful emergent dialysis, intravenous mia, hyperkalemia, hypernatremia, hyperphosphatemia, pro- calcium or insulin and cancellation of procedures. teinuria, renal failure acute, AKI, TLS, hypertension and Hypercalcemia in CLL is extremely rare but 30 cases have nephritis. We reviewed the literature using MEDLINE, case ser- been reported [47–49]. In a retrospective study of 1200 patients ies and the registration studies of these agents for any reported with CLL, 7 patients had high calcium levels [50]. Proposed nephrotoxicity. Table 5 summarizes the drugs studied and re- mechanisms causing hypercalcemia in CLL patients are para- sults found. Ofatumumab, alemtuzumab and ibrutinib were the thyroid hormone–related peptide and 1,25 vitamin D mediated top three offenders, with AKI as the most common finding re- (similar to B-cell lymphomas). Hypercalcemia should also raise ported, followed by TLS and hyponatremia. The newer agents concern for a potential CLL transformation to a large-cell used to treat CLL had fewer renal toxicities than the older lymphoma or another form of aggressive lymphoma [51]. Other agents. Given that some of the newer agents (such as obinutu- various electrolyte disorders that present in CLL are usually zumab and venetoclax) are not yet widely used, the true rate of treatment related and are discussed below. renal toxicities may be underestimated. The mechanism of AKI is unclear in most of these agents. TLS has been rarely reported in patients treated with ibrutinib and acute interstitial nephritis TREATMENT-RELATED TOXICITIES (unpublished, personal communication) has been observed The current standard of care for a fit patient with CLL without while on ibrutinib. In addition, in the largest unpublished series comorbidities is a chemo-immunotherapeutic regimen that in- focused on hypertension in ibrutinib-treated patients, a clear cludes the purine analog fludarabine in combination with cyclo- association between ibrutinib and hypertension was noted [61]. phosphamide and rituximab [52]. However, this combination Nearly 40% of patients developed hypertension within regimen remains toxic for the majority of patients with CLL due 12 months of exposure. Despite aggressive management (mul- to age and comorbidities, particularly due to increased risk for tiple agents), ibrutinib-associated hypertension was persistent infectious complications [53]. Over the last few years, treatment [61]. The data underscore the critical need for monitoring and of CLL has slowly started to evolve from regimens with signifi- management strategies for hypertension and follow-up data on cant impact on long-term outcomes and associated concomi- renal and cardiac events. The literature reviewed in the FAERS tant toxicities to the use of novel agents that specifically target reported additional toxicities of the newer agents, such as TLS dysregulated pathways. These advances are possible given our with venetoclax, leading to early modifications of the dose esca- recent understanding of CLL biology, mainly elucidation of the lation protocol for the drug. The importance of following a strict role of the microenvironment and of the signaling mechanisms ramp-up dosing protocol cannot be emphasized enough. The that allow for survival and proliferation of the malignant CLL literature review of published case reports and series of all clone. These targeted agents include the monoclonal antibody agents used in CLL are summarized in Table 6. obinutuzumab, the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors ibrutinib and acalabrutinib, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor Venetoclax and TLS: an example idelalisib and the BCL-2 inhibitor venetoclax [54–58]. These Venetoclax is now approved for patients with CLL that harbor novel agents are demonstrating unprecedented clinical activity, the chromosome 17p deletion (high risk of progression) who especially in patients with historically low response rates, such have received at least one prior treatment and for whom there as patients with high-risk disease (unmutated IGHV). Since are no other available therapies [58]. The drug is currently being these drugs are relatively new, we are still learning about their potential renal toxicities. reviewed by the FDA for wider approval in patients with relapsed CLL. This is based on the results presented at the an- Most medications used for the treatment of CLL are not nual American Society of Hematology meeting of the MURANO nephrotoxic. While fludarabine has been associated with a few case reports of glomerular disease [59], this is not a common trial, where venetoclax was used in combination with rituximab finding. Ibrutinib [60] and venetoclax [58] have been associated in relapsed/refractory patients with CLL [76]. In the initial Phase with elevated serum creatinine. In addition to reviewing the 1 trial (n¼ 56) of this agent, three patients experienced clinical published literature, we also reviewed the US Food and Drug TLS and seven had clinical parameters of TLS despite slow in- Administration (FDA) adverse event reporting system (FAERS) crements in dosing (venetoclax initiated at 50 mg and ramped quarterly legacy data file (third quarter of 2014 to second up to a maximum target dose of 1200 mg over 3 weeks) and TLS Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 8| R. Wanchoo et al. Table 6. Adverse events with CLL therapies Commonly published renal adverse Drug Mechanism of action events Comments Alemtuzumab Anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody Antiglomerular basement membrane Used in kidney transplants without disease, AKI significant renal effects Acalabrutinib Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor Increased creatinine Recent approval in 2017, unclear if it has any significant kidney toxicity Bendamustine Nitrogen mustard Hypokalemia, hyponatremia and hypocalcemia Chlorambucil Alkylating agent Hyponatremia (SIADH) Cyclophosphamide Alkylating agent Hemorrhagic cystitis, urinary fibrosis and retention, SIADH Dinaciclib CDK9 inhibitor TLS 3–15% (three cases thus far of TLS) Favopiridol CDK9 inhibitor TLS 25% TLS in initial trials—all of the first five trials patients had TLS, two deaths, several cases of dialysis and hospitalizations Fludarabine Purine analog Hematuria, proteinuria and TLS Ibrutinib Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor AKI, hypertension, hypophosphatemia The TLS mentioned in the literature in and hyponatremia initial trials has not been reported postmarketing Idelalisib P13K inhibitor Hypokalemia, AKI and hyponatremia Lenalidomide Immunomodulator TLS, hypokalemia, Fanconi syndrome, Trial amended after TLS onset in 4 of AKI (biopsy proven acute interstitial the first 18 patients (2.9%) nephritis) Obinutuzumab Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody TLS, hypophosphatemia, hypocalce- 2–4.5% TLS; all cases resolved in initial mia, hyperkalemia and hyponatre- trials mia AKI Ofatumumab Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody TLS, AKI 3–4% TLS; all cases resolved in initial trials Rituximab Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody TLS In Phases II and III trials, <1% TLS Venetoclax BCL-2 inhibitor TLS Six patients with clinical TLS including two deaths during dose escalation and many clinical and laboratory TLS cases Based on references [54–79] and the FDA adverse reporting system. AKI, acute kidney injury; BTK, Bruton tyrosine kinase; CDK, cyclin-dependent kinase; P13K, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase; SAIDH, syndrome of inappropriate antidiur- ectic hormone. prophylaxis [55]. Of the three patients, one died due to severe hyperkalemia and one required immediate dialysis. Clinical TLS 400 mg occurred in two patients (resulting in one death) who initiated 200 mg Week 5 venetoclax at 50 mg in the Phase Ib trial that was used as the Week 4 100 mg basis for the MURANO trial [77]. 50 mg Week 3 Based on this experience, a slow ramping of venetoclax was 20 mg Week 2 started with initial doses starting at 20 mg for 1 week, followed Week 1 by a ramp-up scheme totaling 5 weeks to a target dose of 400 mg along with intensive TLS prophylaxis and monitoring in real FIGURE 5: Recommended once-daily dosing schedule for venetoclax 5-week time (Figure 5). A data review of reports of TLS with this agent dose ramp-up used in clinical trials of patients with CLL. For patients with high tumor lysis risk (any measurable lymph nodes with largest diameter >10 cm or revealed that a combination of tumor burden (bulky lymph absolute lymphocyte count >25 10 /L and any measurable lymph node with nodes 5 cm and or elevated lymphocyte count 25  10 ) and largest diameter >5cm), then the first doses of 20 mg and 50 mg should be inpa- reduced renal function at screening could be used to identify tient dosing and lab monitoring done at 0, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h. Hydration with high-risk patients that might develop TLS [78]. For moderate- to 1-2 L/day of fluids with rasburicase recommended. Early Nephrology consulta- high-risk patients, and especially with a creatinine clearance tion in certain very high risk situations. <80 cc/min, the initial 20 and 50 mg doses should be adminis- tered in the hospital with laboratory monitoring at specified timepoints (after 4, 8, 12 and 24 h), early prophylaxis with allo- nephrology and intensive care unit teams are made aware of any admission where venetoclax is planned to be administered purinol or rasburicase and aggressive intravenous fluids. Phosphate measurement might be the earliest clue to tumor and dose-escalated in patients with CLL. We have performed early continuous renal replacement therapy in high-risk cases lysis and should prompt nephrology consultation before severe TLS ensues [79]. With the new dosing regimen and close moni- to allow for safe dose escalation of this agent. Nephrologists toring guidelines appropriate for the level of risk of TLS, TLS has need to be aware of the potential toxicity of this CLL agent. Our become a less common occurrence. At our center, the recommendation is that early nephrology consultation might Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 The Kidney in CLL | 9 be prudent in most cases of moderate to severe risk of TLS with 7. Strati P, Shanafelt TD. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia: diagnosis, nat- every dose escalation of venetoclax, in particular the first two ural history, and risk stratification. Blood 2015; 126: 454–462 dose escalations. In addition to the possibility of CLL affecting the kidney, it is 8. Strati P, Nasr SH, Leung N et al. Renal complications in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lym- important to recognize that the risk of therapy-induced nephr- phocytosis: the Mayo Clinic experience. Haematologica 2015; opathy increases with age. In a disease with prolonged survival, 100: 1180–1188 such as CLL, long-term toxicity becomes equally important, 9. Lanore JJ, Brunet F, Pochard F et al. Hemodialysis for acute as the selected therapy may contribute to morbidity and renal failure in patients with hematologic malignancies. Crit mortality. Care Med 1991; 19: 346–351 10. Salahudeen AK, Doshi SM, Pawar T et al. Incidence rate, clin- CONCLUSION ical correlates, and outcomes of AKI in patients admitted to a comprehensive cancer center. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2013; 8: CLL can affect the kidney in various ways from infiltration, 347–354 glomerular diseases and electrolyte disorders and indirectly 11. Canet E, Zafrani L, Lambert J et al. Acute kidney injury in pa- with treatment-related toxicities. Because we are now in an era tients with newly diagnosed high-grade hematological of more effective targeted therapies for CLL, TLS must be a con- malignancies: impact on remission and survival. PLoS One sideration and proper prophylactic measures instituted. While 2013; 8: e55870 CLL-associated kidney disease may occur due to multiple dis- 12. Schwartz JB and Shamsuddin AM. The effects of leukemic ease-related factors, treatment-associated AKI and TLS might infiltrates in various organs in chronic lymphocytic leuke- be more important in this era of targeted therapies. The veneto- mia. Hum Pathol 1981; 12: 432–440 clax clinical development program provides an example where 13. Barcos M, Lane W, Gomez GA et al. An autopsy study of 1206 collaborative management between various medical specialties acute and chronic leukemias (1958 to 1982). Cancer 1987; 60: can lead to mitigation of the TLS risk and complications related 827–837 to a known potentially fatal toxicity. Familiarity with renal tox- 14. Poitou-Verkinder AL, Francois A, Drieux F et al. 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Blood 2009; 113: 2637–2645 Haematologica 2014; 99(Suppl 1): P868a 72. Andritsos LA, Johnson AJ, Lozanski G et al. Higher doses of 79. Seymour JF, Davids MS, Roberts AW. Safety profile of veneto- lenalidomide are associated with unacceptable toxicity clax monotherapy in patients with chronic lymphocytic leu- including life-threatening tumor flare in patients with kemia. Blood 2016; 128: 4395 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Kidney Journal Oxford University Press

Renal involvement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

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Clinical Kidney Journal, 2018, 1–11 doi: 10.1093/ckj/sfy026 CKJ Review CK J R E V I E W 1 2 2,3 Rimda Wanchoo , Carolina Bernabe Ramirez , Jacqueline Barrientos and Kenar D. Jhaveri Division of Kidney Diseases and Hypertension, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Great Neck, NY, USA, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Lake Success, NY, USA and CLL Research and Treatment Program, Lake Success, NY, USA Correspondence and offprint requests to: Rimda Wanchoo; E-mail: Rwanchoo1@northwell.edu; Twitter handle: @renalmyeloma ABSTRACT Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most commonly diagnosed adult leukemia in the USA and Western Europe. Kidney disease can present in patients with CLL as a manifestation of the disease process such as acute kidney injury with infiltration or with a paraneoplastic glomerular disease or as a manifestation of extra renal obstruction and tumor lysis syndrome. In the current era of novel targeted therapies, kidney disease can also present as a complication of treatment. Tumor lysis syndrome associated with novel agents such as the B-cell lymphoma 2 inhibitor venetoclax and the monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab are important nephrotoxicities associated with these agents. Here we review the various forms of kidney diseases associated with CLL and its therapies. Keywords: AKI, CLL, infiltration, leukemia, onconephrology, paraproteinemia, venetoclax INTRODUCTION requiring transfusion support, life-threatening infections or se- Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most commonly vere organ damage. diagnosed adult leukemia in the USA and Western Europe. Reports published between 1966 and 1973 constituted the Approximately 20 000 new CLL cases are expected to be diag- basis on which Rai et al. [4] developed a system of staging of CLL nosed in the USA in 2017 [1]. The disease affects primarily the that could prospectively distinguish patients according to their elderly, with the majority of patients being diagnosed at a rela- overall outlook for survival (Table 1). This method of staging tive older age (>65 years). The disease is usually monitored con- was recognized as a simple, yet accurate prognostic tool for esti- servatively until disease-related symptoms develop. Most mating survival and received wide acceptance by clinicians. In common manifestations of CLL that require initiation of ther- the current era, genetic and protein markers are also used to apy include fevers, night sweats, weight loss, organomegaly or characterize CLL. Important characteristics of CLL cells are the lymphadenopathy causing discomfort and bone marrow failure presence of the immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (IGHV) (evidenced by worsening anemia or thrombocytopenia) [2, 3]. Unfortunately, by the time most patients require therapy, pa- gene repertoire and expression of stereotyped B-cell receptors [5, 6]. Approximately half of CLL clones will demonstrate unmu- tients have acquired chronic comorbidities that limit their tated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable regions, a finding performance status and ability to tolerate therapy. Hence pa- tients may become too frail to tolerate a regimen that may be associated with shorter overall survival and a higher risk of re- associated with severe toxicities such as myelosuppression lapse following chemoimmunotherapy. In addition, the Received: 22.12.2017. Editorial decision: 26.2.2018 V C The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 2| R. Wanchoo et al. Table 1. Rai staging of CLL Median survival Risk status Stage Description (months) (modified Rai) 0 Lymphocytosis, lymphocytes in blood >15 000 lymphocytes/mm and 40% 140 Low lymphocytes in bone marrow I Stage 0 with enlarged lymph node(s) 100 Intermediate II Stages 0–I with hepatomegaly, splenomegaly or both 70 Intermediate III Stages 0–II with hemoglobin <11 g/dL or hematocrit <33% 20 High IV Stages 0–III with platelets <100 000/lL 20 High Adapted from the National Cancer Institute guidelines and Rai et al. [4]. presence of CD38 appears to be independently associated with Table 2. Summary of various causes of kidney injury in patients an adverse prognosis [5, 6]. Zeta chain–associated protein 70 with CLL (ZAP70), a tyrosine kinase normally expressed by natural killer Type of etiology Potential causes and T cells, is required for normal T-cell receptor signaling. ZAP70 is not normally expressed in B lymphocytes but has been Prerenal Poor oral intake; sepsis and hypoperfusion; found in a subset of patients with CLL and appears to correlate heart failure; cirrhosis; medications such as with survival [5, 6]. Specific cytogenetic abnormalities identified diuretics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and abnor- agents, angiotensin receptor blockers and malities in certain genes identified by molecular genetic testing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors confer prognostic significance in patients with CLL. Of these, Intrinsic renal Glomerular diseases TMA del(13q) and trisomy 12 are favorable prognostic findings. Acute tubular necrosis—sepsis, nephrotoxic Historically, patients with del(17p) or del(11q) have been at high agents and in some cases hyperviscosity and risk of either not responding to initial treatment or relapsing therapy agents soon after achieving remission [5, 6]. Acute interstitial nephritis—infections such as BK or adenovirus, urinary tract infections, KIDNEY DISEASES WITH CLL medication or chemotherapy induced or ma- lignant cell infiltration Kidney disease in patients with CLL may impact survival and Postrenal Obstruction from extrinsic compression of pelva- occurs through diverse mechanisms such as leukemic infiltra- calcyceal system by tumor or lymph nodes tion, extrarenal obstruction, tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), glom- TLS—uric acid nephropathy and intratubular ob- erular diseases, electrolyte disorders and medication side struction from cancer itself or related to the effects. Here we review the kidney diseases associated with CLL use of CLL-directed therapy and its treatments. Strati and Shanafelt [7] found a 7.5% incidence of kidney disease at diagnosis in a cohort of >2000 patients with CLL at the Mayo Clinic. Renal insufficiency at baseline was associated intensive care unit demonstrated some form of AKI in >40% pa- with male gender, older age, more advanced disease and tients. Of those, 29% required renal replacement therapy, with CLL CD49d positivity; these patients were less likely to receive an astounding mortality rate of 72%. The etiology of AKI that purine nucleoside analogue therapy and were more likely to occurs in most hematologic malignancies, including CLL, are di- receive single alkylator-based therapy. Acute kidney injury verse [9]. One study of patients of all hematologic malignancies (AKI) developed in 16% of patients during follow-up and noted that the most common causes of AKI were hypoperfu- was associated with older age, male gender and certain CLL þ þ þ  sion, TLS, hemophagocytic syndrome, direct infiltration of ma- characteristics (IGHV UM, CD49d ,CD38 ,ZAP-70 ,del17p ,or lignant cells and infections [10]. Another study found the most del11q )[7]. A study from the Mayo Clinic found that the pres- common cause of AKI in hematologic malignancies was prere- ence of kidney disease is independently associated with ad- nal azotemia [11]. Based on our experience, prerenal azotemia, verse patient outcomes in CLL. Kidney disease at diagnosis of acute tubular necrosis, TLS from chemotherapy agents and CLL or during follow-up had a significantly decreased overall infiltrative disease are the common causes of AKI in CLL. survival compared with those without kidney disease [8]. Thus Table 2 summarizes the etiologies causing AKI in patients with the presence of kidney disease in patients with CLL affects CLL. patient treatment strategies, clinical trial candidacy and out- comes. Due to the fact that CLL usually follows an indolent course, patients with CLL rarely undergo kidney biopsy. In the Renal infiltration and obstruction studybyStrati et al.[8], of all the CLL patients studied, only The infiltration of extramedullary organs can occur in CLL, but 1.2% of patients underwent kidney biopsy. The low rate of this complication is typically unusual. Postmortem retrospect- kidney biopsy is a limiting factor in our understanding of CLL- ive series and case reports have demonstrated an infiltration of associated kidney disease. monoclonal B cells in the kidneys of patients that developed AKI before their demise. Autopsy studies show that 60–90% of AKI in CLL patients may have leukemic-cell infiltration in the kidneys but, AKI in patients with leukemia is common. A study looking at even at late stages, kidney function may remain unimpaired >300 patients with hematologic malignancies admitted to an [12, 13]. This clinical phenotype has been linked to a more Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 The Kidney in CLL | 3 FIGURE 1: The renal parenchyma is infiltrated by monomorphic lymphocytes with an immunotype characteristic of CLL/small lymphocytic lymphoma. Immunohistochemistry stains reveal strongly positive B-cell marker CD20, negative T-cell marker CD3 and aberrantly expressed T-cell marker CD5. aggressive or advanced Rai stage. A retrospective study by nephromegaly, which can affect one or both kidneys and results Poitou-Verkinder et al.[14] identified 15 patients afflicted with from diffuse or nodular parenchymal infiltration by leukemic CLL from a repository of 3950 kidney biopsies. Pathology cells [17, 18]. The sensitivity and specificity of this finding are showed that CLL monoclonal infiltrates were present in 10 of not known. For example, one series found that only 1 of 10 pa- the biopsies; 9 patients had glomerulopathies, with membrano- tients with biopsy-proven renal infiltration had increased kid- proliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) being the most com- ney size [14]. Other abnormalities include single or multiple monly reported histologic form. A large Mayo Clinic study that nodules and wedge-shaped or geographic areas that enhance included patients with both CLL and monoclonal B-cell lympho- less than the adjacent normal renal parenchyma after intraven- cytosis had a kidney biopsy if they presented with nephrotic ous contrast agent administration [17, 18]. No specific studies syndrome or renal insufficiency. Of 4012 patients with CLL, only have investigated how changes in imaging correlate as kidney 49 (1.2% of all patients) had pathological findings of CLL (infiltra- function improves or worsens with CLL. tion and glomerular diseases) in their kidneys [8]. This is in Obstructive nephropathy in the setting of CLL can be striking contrast to autopsy studies done in the 1980s [12, 13]. observed and is diagnosed radiographically via ultrasound, MRI Interestingly, the pattern or extent of infiltration did not correl- or CT scan. Bilateral hydronephrosis from obstructing nodes ate with the degree of AKI [8]. Another review of the literature is managed with decompression and treating the underlying found 17 reports of patients with kidney biopsies showing renal CLL [16]. infiltration by CLL in addition to other histologic findings, with no association found between the absolute lymphocyte count and CLL renal infiltration [15]. Kidney function has been noted Other interstitial diseases to improve with CLL treatment in many patients with infiltra- Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (non-infection related) in tive disease on biopsy [14]. Figure 1 shows a case of AKI with the setting of CLL has been described in case reports and small CLL infiltrative disease. case series [19], with partial recovery in 90% of the patients with The mechanism of AKI with CLL infiltration is not clearly CLL treatment. BK virus nephropathy in the native kidneys has established but has been hypothesized to involve tubular/ also been reported with CLL [15, 20]. microvascular compression causing intrarenal obstruction in addition to an infiltration-associated inflammatory/cytokine re- sponse [12, 16]. The radiology literature also describes the use of Glomerular diseases multidetector row computed tomography (CT), magnetic reson- Several glomerular diseases have been associated with CLL, ance imaging (MRI), positive emission tomography and ultra- with >50 cases mentioned via case reports and case series. The sound to identify CLL involvement of the kidney, but these most frequently reported findings are MPGN (36%) and mem- studies do not include histologic correlation. In general, when branous nephropathy (19%). While specific percentages are not kidney involvement is detected at imaging, there is also evi- available, a large number of cases exist of CLL with amyloidosis dence of extramedullary involvement in other sites. The most common imaging pattern of kidney involvement in leukemia is as well. Other rare findings are minimal change disease (MCD), Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 4| R. Wanchoo et al. FIGURE 2: A glomerulus with a membranoproliferative pattern of injury. There is marked mesangial expansion by matrix and cells, thickened and remodeled capillary walls and frequent inflammatory cells in the glomerular capillary lumens. By immunofluorescence microscopy, this lesion reveals IgG-kappa restricted reactivity. Lambda light chain is completely negative. immunotactoid glomerulopathy and focal segmental glomeru- hematologic malignancy and resolution of the glomerular dis- losclerosis [8, 14]. eases with chemotherapy strongly suggests an immune-medi- Paraprotein-mediated kidney disease has been well ated mechanism. Interestingly, MCD was described in a patient described in CLL, ranging from 2.5 to 60% of cases [8]. In a study with monoclonal B lymphocytosis; a precursor state of CLL [23]. from France, 6/15 patients that underwent a kidney biopsy in a Similar to monoclonal gammopathy of unclear significance that CLL cohort presented with a monoclonal dysproteinemia [14]. can lead to kidney disease, monoclonal B lymphocytosis can Abnormal serum free light chains can be detected in 30–40% also be responsible for kidney disease [24]. patients with CLL. Recent data suggest a significant correlation Membranous nephropathy is usually more common with between the abnormal free light chain ratio and outcome of CLL solid tumors [25]. CLL-associated membranous nephropathy patients [21]. The monoclonal protein secreted by the B-cell has been described and a few of them respond to chemotherapy clone can either be directly involved in the pathogenesis of the of CLL [8]. The cases described were prior to the discovery of the lesions, as in cases of fibrillary glomerulopathy, immunotactoid M-type phospholipase A2 receptor on podocytes that has been nephropathy, amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis or type I/II associated with primary membranous nephropathy [26]. Systemic amyloidosis has been associated with CLL. A large cyroglobulinemia or indirectly in cases of MPGN not related to study from the Mayo Clinic reviewed all cases of CLL and amyl- cyroglobulinemia [14]. Light chain cast nephropathy has also been described in patients with CLL [8]. oidosis [27]. Over a span of 20 years, 33 patients were identified, By far the most common glomerular lesion noted in CLL pa- 61% had AL amyloidosis and 39% had non-AL amyloidosis. Of tients is MPGN (Figure 2). In most studies the majority of the pa- the 18 patients with AL amyloidosis that had typing results tients had a paraproteinemia [8, 14]. Cryoglobulin-associated available, four had a CLL clone only and the remaining 14 had MPGN was also fairly common in this subgroup [8]. In cases of both a plasma cell and CLL clone. Six patients had both a fibrillary and immunotactoid glomerular diseases seen in CLL, plasma cell and CLL clone that shared the same light chain. For light microscopy findings were suggestive of MPGN, with many patients with AL amyloidosis associated with CLL, the patients patients having a circulating monoclonal protein (Figure 3). received agents that targeted B and plasma cells. The median Cases of MPGN presenting as C3 glomerulonephritis have also survival for AL amyloidosis patients with CLL was 38.9 months been reported, suggesting indirect damage via activation of the [27]. Other sporadic cases of AL amyloidosis have been reported alternative complement system [22]. with CLL and treatment is challenging, as it is not easy to de- MCD has also been reported in many cases of CLL [8, 11]. The cipher if the CLL and plasma cell dyscrasias are truly related or pathophysiology of this association is unclear. Both a B-cell- two separate entities [28–33]. mediated mechanism and T-cell dysfunction have been pro- Nine patients in the above-mentioned cohort [27] had posed. The co-development of a podocytopathy along with non-AL amyloidosis. Cases with non-AL amyloidosis that had Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 The Kidney in CLL | 5 Table 3. Summary of published cases of various glomerular diseases seen with CLL Kidney pathology reported Cases, n Reference MPGN 37 [8, 14] AL amyloidosis 24 [27–33] MCD 13 [8, 11, 23] Membranous nephropathy 12 [8] AA amyloidosis 9 [27] Proliferative GN 8 [8, 14] Thrombotic microangiopathy 6 [8] Fibrillary GN 4 [8, 14] Immunotactoid glomerulopathy 4 [8, 14] C3 GN 3 [22] FSGS 2 [8, 14] Most cases included direct deposition of monoclonal proteins in the form of proliferative glomerulonephritis, C3 deposits or cryoglobulinemia. AA, amyloid type A protein; GN, glomerulonephritis; FSGS, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. ELECTROLYTE DISORDERS FIGURE 3: Immunotactoid organized deposits within the mesangial matrix. The deposits are composed of microtubules, sometimes in a parallel arrangement. TLS TLS is the most common oncologic emergency with an inci- amyloid typing done comprised mostly the patients with the dence as high as 26% in high-grade B-cell acute lymphoblastic transthyretin (seven patients) form of amyloidosis. One patient leukemia [34]. TLS results from rapid release of the intracellular had insulin-type amyloid and she was a type 1 diabetic who contents of dying cancer cells into the bloodstream either had been on insulin for >50 years prior to diagnosis of amyloid- spontaneously or in response to cancer therapy. It is bio- osis [27]. The patients with non-AL amyloidosis with CLL chemically characterized by hyperuricemia, hyperkalemia, received no specific agents targeting plasma cell clones. The hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia. Cardiac arrhythmias, median overall survival of the non-AL amyloidosis patients was seizures and superimposed AKI are common clinical presenta- 61.4 months, much better than the AL amyloidosis patients tions (Figure 4). Table 4 summarizes the Cairo–Bishop definition with CLL [27]. of laboratory TLS and clinical TLS. This is the classic def- The high prevalence of an abnormal serum free light chain inition used in diagnosing TLS. The pathophysiology of ratio and increase in free light chains in general in patients with TLS-mediated AKI involves intratubular obstruction and inflam- CLL brings into question whether a subset of these patients mation by precipitation of crystals of uric acid, calcium phos- with CLL have undiagnosed AL amyloidosis [22]. Polyclonal B phate and/or xanthine. Preexisting kidney dysfunction favors cells share the same microenvironmental interactions as tumor intratubular crystal precipitation. Consensus recommendations cells and could themselves be activated by antigenic stimula- for TLS prophylaxis include volume expansion for all risk tion of the CLL clone. This later may in turn convey activatory groups, use of allopurinol in medium- and high-risk groups and signals to bystander B and T lymphocytes. It is possible that the use of recombinant urate oxidase (rasburicase) in high-risk tumor-derived monoclonal free light chains can be admixed groups. The utility of diuretics and urine alkalization are vari- with variable amounts of serum free light chains produced by able and their efficacy is debatable [34, 35]. non-clonal bystander B cells in the lymphohematopoietic tis- While TLS is uncommon in CLL, it is still an issue that needs sues [22]. to be addressed, particularly with the use of one of the novel Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) has been reported in targeted agents used in the treatment of CLL, namely the drug patients with CLL. In the study by Strati et al.[8], six patients venetoclax. The use of venetoclax, a recently approved B-cell presented with TMA (renal limited or systemic) as the renal lymphoma 2 protein (bcl-2) inhibitor for use in a select group of manifestation of CLL. Four of the six patients responded to patients with relapsed CLL that carry del17p (high risk of pro- treatment with CLL, one required a stem cell transplant- gression), has led to drug-induced TLS in 3–6% of patients [36]. ation and the other had simultaneous lung cancer [8]. All six pa- In order to minimize the risk of TLS, a strict protocol has been tients had clinical presentation of AKI, proteinuria, hemolysis, established that will be discussed in more detail in a later anemia, elevated lactate dehydrogenase and presence of schis- section. tocytes on peripheral smear and low haptoglobin. Other associ- ated glomerular diseases with CLL are listed below in Table 3 in Other electrolyte disorders order of incidence. Glomerular diseases associated with cancer, and in this The most common electrolyte disorder encountered in CLL case CLL, can present preceding the CLL diagnosis [25]. CLL is patients is pseudohyperkalemia. Potassium tends to stay pre- frequently not treated or treated late. If there is end organ dominantly in the intracellular compartment. Leakage of po- damage and we are able to connect the kidney disease to CLL, tassium from the intracellular compartment at the time of perhaps treatment might be important and critical for renal collection due to hemolysis, cell fragility or heparin-induced survival. The term ‘CLL with renal significance’ should be con- damage can lead to spurious elevation of measured potassium sidered for cases that present with this dilemma. levels, which is known as pseudohyperkalemia. In addition, Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 6| R. Wanchoo et al. Tumor Lysis Syndrome Uric acid release Phosphorus release Potassium release Hyperphosphatemia Hyperuricemia Hyperkalemia Calcium phosphate crystals Uric acid crystals Arrhythmias Acute kidney injury FIGURE 4: Clinical presentation summary of tumor lysis syndrome. Routine serum analysis leads to high measured potassium Table 4. Cairo–Bishop definition of laboratory TLS and clinical TLS levels due to the release of potassium from fragile leukemic Electrolyte disorder Criterion cells during the clotting process. But in CLL, even the plasma levels of potassium are elevated. Severe leukocytosis leads Potassium 6 mEq/L or 25% increase from baseline to consumption of metabolic fuels that can impair sodium- Phosphorus 4.5 mg/dL or 25% increase from baseline potassium ATPase activity, leading to release of potassium from Calcium >25% decrease from baseline a high number of white cells [43]. While in elevated platelet lev- Uric acid 8 mg/dL or 25% increase from baseline els, serum and plasma levels can differentiate pseudohyperka- lemia, elevated white cell–related pseudohyperkalemia might Clinical criteria: laboratory criteria and one or more of the following: (i) creatinine 1.5 upper limit of normal, (ii) seizures, (iii) cardiac arrhythmia not be as straightforward to distinguish. While not common, or sudden death. Laboratory TLS requires that two or more of the following another interesting electrolyte disorder noted in CLL patients is metabolic abnormalities occur within 3 days before or up to 7 days after the initi- reverse pseudohyperkalemia [44, 45], where plasma potassium ation of therapy: hyperuricemia, hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia and hypo- is noted to be higher than serum potassium [46]. The mechan- calcemia. Clinical TLS is present when laboratory TLS is accompanied by an ism is not well understood but may be due to an increase in sen- increased creatinine level, seizures, cardiac dysrhythmia or death. sitivity to heparin-mediated cell membrane damage during processing and centrifugation in a hematologic malignancy and myeloproliferative disorders and thrombocytosis can also lead mechanical stressors. To our knowledge, there is no specific to pseudohyperkalemia. Thrombocytosis (platelet count >1000 way to predict or correct the measured potassium value based 10 /L) can also lead to pseudohyperkalemia. Elevation of the on the white cell count. blood platelet count by 1000  10 /L can lead to an increase of The time to collection and analysis of the blood sample can 0.2 mmol/L in plasma potassium and 0.7 mmol/L in serum po- help eliminate some of these findings. Allowing serum to sit on tassium [37]. As a result, the potassium concentration is gener- the clot for too long (>2 h) can significantly increase the potas- ally higher in serum compared with plasma from platelets sium values. Ideally, specimens for patients with significantly during clotting. Similarly, elevated potassium levels have been elevated white cell counts should be delivered in person to min- described in leukocytosis as well. An artifactually elevated serum imize hemolysis. Arterial blood gas samples in a balanced hep- potassium level or spurious hyperkalemia was first described [38] arin syringe for potassium measurement can decrease the with extreme leukocytosis (>600  10 /L)and severalcase reports transit time to allow for more accurate potassium measure- thereafter [39–41]. Katkish et al. [42]reviewed >300 patients with ment. Venous blood gas measurements can be useful, but keep CLL listed in the tumor registry in the state of Minnesota between in mind that venous samples have more mechanical stressors 1997 and 2014. The researchers found that the adjusted odds of a compared with arterial blood draw techniques, making arterial patient’s potassium being elevated increased by 1.4 [95% confi- draws more accurate. We also recommend checking a simultan- dence interval (CI) 1.2–1.5; P < 0.0001] for every 10  10 /L increase eous plasma potassium level in patients with white cell counts in white blood cell count. Below a white blood cell count of 50 >100  10 /L. An electrocardiogram (EKG) can be helpful in dif- 10 cells/L, the median estimated percentage of a patient’s potas- ferentiating pseudohyperkalemia/reverse pseudohyperkalemia sium being elevated was 1.7%, but was considerably higher, at from true hyperkalemia. The absence of typical EKG changes is 8.1%, when the white blood cell count was 100  10 /L. This is usually helpful in identifying pseudohyperkalemia. High the first and only study to systematically look at serum potassium plasma lactate dehydrogenase levels may indicate hemolysis or values in CLL patients [42] demonstrating that the results are rupture of fragile white blood cells seen in CLL patients. related to pseudohyperkalemia. Consideration should be given to testing serum potassium if the Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 The Kidney in CLL | 7 Table 5. Summary of FDA adverse events by targeted agents used in CLL (2014–17) Agent AKI Hyponatremia Hypokalemia Hypophosphatemia Hypomagnesemia Hyperkalemia Proteinuria TLS Total Alemtuzumab 2500 0 0 0 3 133 Ofatumumab 2976 0 0 3 0 16 61 Ibrutinib 9 9 54 1 3 0 6 37 Idelalisib 4 1 2 0 0 3 0 8 18 Obinutuzumab 10 0 0 1 0 1 0 8 20 Venetoclax 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 Bold numbers suggest highest type of injury. plasma potassium is elevated in the context of leukocytosis, es- quarter of 2017) for all recently approved targeted agents for pecially if reverse pseudohyperkalemia is suspected. In add- CLL. Well-established chemotherapy agents used in CLL such as ition, we suggest placing a warning in the electronic medical cyclophosphamide and fludarabine were excluded. The adverse record to alert clinicians to potential pseudohyperkalemia in event terms queried were hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, patients with CLL and leukocytosis. Such recognition might hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, hypocalcemia, hypercalce- help prevent costly and harmful emergent dialysis, intravenous mia, hyperkalemia, hypernatremia, hyperphosphatemia, pro- calcium or insulin and cancellation of procedures. teinuria, renal failure acute, AKI, TLS, hypertension and Hypercalcemia in CLL is extremely rare but 30 cases have nephritis. We reviewed the literature using MEDLINE, case ser- been reported [47–49]. In a retrospective study of 1200 patients ies and the registration studies of these agents for any reported with CLL, 7 patients had high calcium levels [50]. Proposed nephrotoxicity. Table 5 summarizes the drugs studied and re- mechanisms causing hypercalcemia in CLL patients are para- sults found. Ofatumumab, alemtuzumab and ibrutinib were the thyroid hormone–related peptide and 1,25 vitamin D mediated top three offenders, with AKI as the most common finding re- (similar to B-cell lymphomas). Hypercalcemia should also raise ported, followed by TLS and hyponatremia. The newer agents concern for a potential CLL transformation to a large-cell used to treat CLL had fewer renal toxicities than the older lymphoma or another form of aggressive lymphoma [51]. Other agents. Given that some of the newer agents (such as obinutu- various electrolyte disorders that present in CLL are usually zumab and venetoclax) are not yet widely used, the true rate of treatment related and are discussed below. renal toxicities may be underestimated. The mechanism of AKI is unclear in most of these agents. TLS has been rarely reported in patients treated with ibrutinib and acute interstitial nephritis TREATMENT-RELATED TOXICITIES (unpublished, personal communication) has been observed The current standard of care for a fit patient with CLL without while on ibrutinib. In addition, in the largest unpublished series comorbidities is a chemo-immunotherapeutic regimen that in- focused on hypertension in ibrutinib-treated patients, a clear cludes the purine analog fludarabine in combination with cyclo- association between ibrutinib and hypertension was noted [61]. phosphamide and rituximab [52]. However, this combination Nearly 40% of patients developed hypertension within regimen remains toxic for the majority of patients with CLL due 12 months of exposure. Despite aggressive management (mul- to age and comorbidities, particularly due to increased risk for tiple agents), ibrutinib-associated hypertension was persistent infectious complications [53]. Over the last few years, treatment [61]. The data underscore the critical need for monitoring and of CLL has slowly started to evolve from regimens with signifi- management strategies for hypertension and follow-up data on cant impact on long-term outcomes and associated concomi- renal and cardiac events. The literature reviewed in the FAERS tant toxicities to the use of novel agents that specifically target reported additional toxicities of the newer agents, such as TLS dysregulated pathways. These advances are possible given our with venetoclax, leading to early modifications of the dose esca- recent understanding of CLL biology, mainly elucidation of the lation protocol for the drug. The importance of following a strict role of the microenvironment and of the signaling mechanisms ramp-up dosing protocol cannot be emphasized enough. The that allow for survival and proliferation of the malignant CLL literature review of published case reports and series of all clone. These targeted agents include the monoclonal antibody agents used in CLL are summarized in Table 6. obinutuzumab, the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors ibrutinib and acalabrutinib, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor Venetoclax and TLS: an example idelalisib and the BCL-2 inhibitor venetoclax [54–58]. These Venetoclax is now approved for patients with CLL that harbor novel agents are demonstrating unprecedented clinical activity, the chromosome 17p deletion (high risk of progression) who especially in patients with historically low response rates, such have received at least one prior treatment and for whom there as patients with high-risk disease (unmutated IGHV). Since are no other available therapies [58]. The drug is currently being these drugs are relatively new, we are still learning about their potential renal toxicities. reviewed by the FDA for wider approval in patients with relapsed CLL. This is based on the results presented at the an- Most medications used for the treatment of CLL are not nual American Society of Hematology meeting of the MURANO nephrotoxic. While fludarabine has been associated with a few case reports of glomerular disease [59], this is not a common trial, where venetoclax was used in combination with rituximab finding. Ibrutinib [60] and venetoclax [58] have been associated in relapsed/refractory patients with CLL [76]. In the initial Phase with elevated serum creatinine. In addition to reviewing the 1 trial (n¼ 56) of this agent, three patients experienced clinical published literature, we also reviewed the US Food and Drug TLS and seven had clinical parameters of TLS despite slow in- Administration (FDA) adverse event reporting system (FAERS) crements in dosing (venetoclax initiated at 50 mg and ramped quarterly legacy data file (third quarter of 2014 to second up to a maximum target dose of 1200 mg over 3 weeks) and TLS Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 8| R. Wanchoo et al. Table 6. Adverse events with CLL therapies Commonly published renal adverse Drug Mechanism of action events Comments Alemtuzumab Anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody Antiglomerular basement membrane Used in kidney transplants without disease, AKI significant renal effects Acalabrutinib Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor Increased creatinine Recent approval in 2017, unclear if it has any significant kidney toxicity Bendamustine Nitrogen mustard Hypokalemia, hyponatremia and hypocalcemia Chlorambucil Alkylating agent Hyponatremia (SIADH) Cyclophosphamide Alkylating agent Hemorrhagic cystitis, urinary fibrosis and retention, SIADH Dinaciclib CDK9 inhibitor TLS 3–15% (three cases thus far of TLS) Favopiridol CDK9 inhibitor TLS 25% TLS in initial trials—all of the first five trials patients had TLS, two deaths, several cases of dialysis and hospitalizations Fludarabine Purine analog Hematuria, proteinuria and TLS Ibrutinib Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor AKI, hypertension, hypophosphatemia The TLS mentioned in the literature in and hyponatremia initial trials has not been reported postmarketing Idelalisib P13K inhibitor Hypokalemia, AKI and hyponatremia Lenalidomide Immunomodulator TLS, hypokalemia, Fanconi syndrome, Trial amended after TLS onset in 4 of AKI (biopsy proven acute interstitial the first 18 patients (2.9%) nephritis) Obinutuzumab Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody TLS, hypophosphatemia, hypocalce- 2–4.5% TLS; all cases resolved in initial mia, hyperkalemia and hyponatre- trials mia AKI Ofatumumab Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody TLS, AKI 3–4% TLS; all cases resolved in initial trials Rituximab Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody TLS In Phases II and III trials, <1% TLS Venetoclax BCL-2 inhibitor TLS Six patients with clinical TLS including two deaths during dose escalation and many clinical and laboratory TLS cases Based on references [54–79] and the FDA adverse reporting system. AKI, acute kidney injury; BTK, Bruton tyrosine kinase; CDK, cyclin-dependent kinase; P13K, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase; SAIDH, syndrome of inappropriate antidiur- ectic hormone. prophylaxis [55]. Of the three patients, one died due to severe hyperkalemia and one required immediate dialysis. Clinical TLS 400 mg occurred in two patients (resulting in one death) who initiated 200 mg Week 5 venetoclax at 50 mg in the Phase Ib trial that was used as the Week 4 100 mg basis for the MURANO trial [77]. 50 mg Week 3 Based on this experience, a slow ramping of venetoclax was 20 mg Week 2 started with initial doses starting at 20 mg for 1 week, followed Week 1 by a ramp-up scheme totaling 5 weeks to a target dose of 400 mg along with intensive TLS prophylaxis and monitoring in real FIGURE 5: Recommended once-daily dosing schedule for venetoclax 5-week time (Figure 5). A data review of reports of TLS with this agent dose ramp-up used in clinical trials of patients with CLL. For patients with high tumor lysis risk (any measurable lymph nodes with largest diameter >10 cm or revealed that a combination of tumor burden (bulky lymph absolute lymphocyte count >25 10 /L and any measurable lymph node with nodes 5 cm and or elevated lymphocyte count 25  10 ) and largest diameter >5cm), then the first doses of 20 mg and 50 mg should be inpa- reduced renal function at screening could be used to identify tient dosing and lab monitoring done at 0, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h. Hydration with high-risk patients that might develop TLS [78]. For moderate- to 1-2 L/day of fluids with rasburicase recommended. Early Nephrology consulta- high-risk patients, and especially with a creatinine clearance tion in certain very high risk situations. <80 cc/min, the initial 20 and 50 mg doses should be adminis- tered in the hospital with laboratory monitoring at specified timepoints (after 4, 8, 12 and 24 h), early prophylaxis with allo- nephrology and intensive care unit teams are made aware of any admission where venetoclax is planned to be administered purinol or rasburicase and aggressive intravenous fluids. Phosphate measurement might be the earliest clue to tumor and dose-escalated in patients with CLL. We have performed early continuous renal replacement therapy in high-risk cases lysis and should prompt nephrology consultation before severe TLS ensues [79]. With the new dosing regimen and close moni- to allow for safe dose escalation of this agent. Nephrologists toring guidelines appropriate for the level of risk of TLS, TLS has need to be aware of the potential toxicity of this CLL agent. Our become a less common occurrence. At our center, the recommendation is that early nephrology consultation might Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ckj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ckj/sfy026/4967844 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 12 July 2018 The Kidney in CLL | 9 be prudent in most cases of moderate to severe risk of TLS with 7. Strati P, Shanafelt TD. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia: diagnosis, nat- every dose escalation of venetoclax, in particular the first two ural history, and risk stratification. Blood 2015; 126: 454–462 dose escalations. In addition to the possibility of CLL affecting the kidney, it is 8. Strati P, Nasr SH, Leung N et al. Renal complications in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and monoclonal B-cell lym- important to recognize that the risk of therapy-induced nephr- phocytosis: the Mayo Clinic experience. Haematologica 2015; opathy increases with age. In a disease with prolonged survival, 100: 1180–1188 such as CLL, long-term toxicity becomes equally important, 9. Lanore JJ, Brunet F, Pochard F et al. Hemodialysis for acute as the selected therapy may contribute to morbidity and renal failure in patients with hematologic malignancies. Crit mortality. Care Med 1991; 19: 346–351 10. Salahudeen AK, Doshi SM, Pawar T et al. Incidence rate, clin- CONCLUSION ical correlates, and outcomes of AKI in patients admitted to a comprehensive cancer center. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2013; 8: CLL can affect the kidney in various ways from infiltration, 347–354 glomerular diseases and electrolyte disorders and indirectly 11. Canet E, Zafrani L, Lambert J et al. Acute kidney injury in pa- with treatment-related toxicities. Because we are now in an era tients with newly diagnosed high-grade hematological of more effective targeted therapies for CLL, TLS must be a con- malignancies: impact on remission and survival. PLoS One sideration and proper prophylactic measures instituted. While 2013; 8: e55870 CLL-associated kidney disease may occur due to multiple dis- 12. Schwartz JB and Shamsuddin AM. The effects of leukemic ease-related factors, treatment-associated AKI and TLS might infiltrates in various organs in chronic lymphocytic leuke- be more important in this era of targeted therapies. The veneto- mia. Hum Pathol 1981; 12: 432–440 clax clinical development program provides an example where 13. Barcos M, Lane W, Gomez GA et al. An autopsy study of 1206 collaborative management between various medical specialties acute and chronic leukemias (1958 to 1982). Cancer 1987; 60: can lead to mitigation of the TLS risk and complications related 827–837 to a known potentially fatal toxicity. Familiarity with renal tox- 14. Poitou-Verkinder AL, Francois A, Drieux F et al. 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Clinical Kidney JournalOxford University Press

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