Recent Books

Recent Books Baily’s Magazine of Sports and Pastimes: An Index and Bibliography. By Chris Harte. Carmarthen: Sports History Publishing. 2017. 380 pp. £30. isbn 978 1 898010 09 8. Available from the author (with £3 inland postage), Braemar House, St David's Avenue, Carmarthen, sa31 sdn. Between March 1860 and June 1926, 796 illustrated monthly issues of the London- based Baily's Magazine of Sports and Pastimes appeared in 125 volumes. No indoor pastimes were covered by Baily's. The sports covered were generally those needing considerable wealth to indulge in, such as hunting and horse-racing. Cricket was covered, but the working man's football was ignored and motoring was eventually to make an appearance. A curious feature of the magazine was that until 1889 each volume contained seven numbers, resulting in each volume commencing with a different month for seven years. Profiles of sportsmen, discussions about breeding polo ponies, and stirring accounts of wolf-hunting in Normandy were supplemented by serial fiction and verse on relevant topics. The introduction which deals with the history of Baily's takes the form of a long extract from the magazine's final issue with a few additions by Harte, a former sports-writer and now an enthusiastic sports historian. His later postscript outlines the sometimes fraught history of the Baily family business. There is also an 1891 extract from Baily's concerning earlier sporting periodicals. Changes to the magazine's format and contents are recorded in brief notes at the appropriate points in the index. Despite the title, this book is not an index. It is simply a massive chronological listing of contents and illustrations with the addition of identifying where possible the internal and external authors behind the pseudonyms and abbreviations. Comparing Harte's Index with the original we can see from the April 1871 issue that he helpfully identifies the pseudonyms of ‘Old Calabar’ as the suitably aristocratic Theobald de Vismes and the poet ‘Amphion’ as the scarcely better known George Tyrrell. Less helpfully he abbreviates an article's original title of ‘William Mortimer: The Master of Old Surrey’ to the much less useful ‘Portrait and Biography—William Mortimer’. A monograph on the principal writers in the magazine is promised. The lack of an index means that Harte's massive labours are somewhat difficult to access. Anyone interested in the poetry of hunting or hoping to use Baily's to trace the rise of golf will find much material of interest, but will have to do almost as much work as flicking through the actual volumes. John Sparrow, Warden of All Souls College, Oxford. By Peter Raina. Oxford: Peter Lang. 2017. xxiii + 806 pp. £80.34. isbn 978 1 78707 506 1. In 1963 John Sparrow delivered the Sandars lectures in bibliography at Cambridge. The resulting book, copiously illustrated, was published by Cambridge University Press in 1969 as Visible Words. The lectures were drawn from his own travels, especially in Italy, and very largely from books on his own shelves. It reveals a person who barely appears in the present book, which gives few details of his book collecting or its scholarly range beyond an enthusiasm for A. E. Housman. Yet collecting dominated many of his leisure hours, whether finding and swapping books with his friends (he could be a generous donor), or adding to the shelves of books bound in limp vellum, many in neo-Latin, for which he had a particular attachment. His quest for multiple copies of Mark Pattison's Memoirs was towards a project that was never completed but emerged a little in his Clark lectures on Mark Pattison and the Idea of a University. Raina's book is part biography, and part a selection of letters, many of them trivial. It traverses some familiar ground, notably the Lady Chatterley trial and debates about the place of All Souls in modern Oxford. But those who expect to learn about bibliophily, or indeed some of his closest friends, will be disappointed. He himself would have been more than disappointed in mistakes such as ‘A. E. Houseman’, or Jane (for Janet) Stone. Bernard M. Rosenthal, 5 May 1920 –14 January 2017: A Biographical and Bibliographical Account by Ian Jackson in the Style of the Dictionnaire historique et critique of Pierre Bayle (1647–1706). Berkeley, California: Printed for the Wednesday Table. 2017. 12 pp. + plate + explanatory leaflet + list of errata and addenda. $60. Available from the author at www.ianjacksonbooks.com. This act of homage to the bookseller Barney Rosenthal takes the form of an annotated reprint in large folio format of the obituary by Ian Jackson published in the San Francisco Chronicle of 22 January 2017. The Wednesday Table, the dining club for Bay Area antiquarian booksellers established by Rosenthal in the 1980s, commissioned an expanded version of this obituary to be printed as a keepsake, perhaps as a broadside, but in the end a more fitting tribute was conceived for the man whose greatest contribution to the book trade was to demonstrate the importance of glosses, commentaries, and marginal annotations in manuscripts and printed books. Taking the newspaper article of a thousand words as his textus, Jackson has liberally glossed each sentence with commentaries laid out with scrupulous fidelity to the typography and to the prose style of Pierre Bayle's famous dictionary, thereby expanding the publication to some 25,000 words, combining choice remarques with extracts from letters from Rosenthal's friends and collaborators, themselves provided with due apparatus criticus in the margins. The letterpress is typeset by Richard Seibert and complemented by a photographic portrait by Elvira Piedra as the frontispiece. A Maturing Market: The Iberian Book World in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century. Ed. by Alexander S. Wilkinson and Alejandra Ulla Lorenzo. (Library of the Written Word, 59; The Handpress World, 44.) Leiden: Brill. 2017. xv + 285 pp. €120. isbn 978 90 04 34037 4 (hardback); 978 90 04 34038 1 (e-book). Until recently, any attempt to understand the contribution of print to Iberian culture of the seventeenth century was severely constrained by the lack of co-ordinated documentation of publications after 1600. Alexander Wilkinson's foundational catalogue of Iberian Books (3 vols, Leiden, 2010–15; also freely available at iberian.ucd.ie and as part of ustc.ac.uk) enabled the analysis of publishing trends up to 1650, and a conference on the subject was held in Dublin in 2014 from which the present book derives. Includes: Alexander S. Wilkinson, ‘A Maturing Market: The Iberian Book World in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century’; César Manrique Figueroa, ‘Printing in Antwerp in the Early Seventeenth Century and its Connections with the Iberian World’; Idalia García, ‘The Importation of Books into New Spain during the Seventeenth Century’; Alejandra Ulla Lorenzo, ‘Women and the Iberian Book Trade, 1472–1650’; Sarah Malfatti, ‘The Book-Reader Relationship in Golden- Age Spain: Reading Practices and the Publishing Industry in Don Quixote’; José Maria Pérez Fernández, ‘“Reasons of State for Any Author”: Common Sense, Translation, and the International Republic of Letters’; Esther Villegas de la Torre, ‘Writing Literature for Publication, 1605–1637’; Don Cruickshank, ‘Printed Plays in Early Modern Spain’; John O’Neill, ‘Cervantes's Ocho comedias: From the Pen to the Print-Shop’; Manuel Calderón Calderón, ‘Printing Licenses and the Trade in Fiction in Spain in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century’; Aurelio Vargas Díaz- Toledo, ‘Printing Books of Chivalry in Portugal at the Beginning of the Seventeenth Century’; Hervé Baudry, ‘Medical Publishing in Portugal in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century: A Good Business?’; Henry Ettinghausen, ‘The Golden Age of the Single Event Printed Newsletter: Relaciones de sucesos, 1601–1650’; Ricard Expósito Amagat, ‘“Things Worthy of Being Known”: The Reception and Consumption of the Press in Catalonia during the First Half of the Seventeenth Century’. Reading Galileo: Scribal Technologies and the Two New Sciences. By Renée Raphael. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 2017. ix + 265 pp. $54.95. isbn 978 1 4214 2177 3. Galileo's last work, Discorsi e dimostrazioni matematiche intorno a due nuove scienze (Leiden, 1638), is regarded as a seminal work of the scientific revolution and the foundation of modern physics. Studying annotations in surviving copies and printed and manuscript sources, Renée Raphael re-examines the assumption that Galileo's own rhetoric of novelty, studying the book of nature in place of textual exegesis, meant that the book itself was read in a new way, ushering in a Kuhnian paradigm shift. Her sources are the annotations of a handful of readers close to Galileo and his milieu, Giovanni Battista Baliani, Vincenzo Viviani, and Marin Mersenne, which are well known to scholars, and Seth Ward's annotations—duplicated in Sir Christopher Wren's copy—which have not been studied in depth before. The chapters on these readers are followed by a study of two communities of ‘readers’: professors of natural philosophy at Pisa and Jesuit teachers at the Collegio Romano. Printed and manuscript lecture courses reveal how the ‘new’ sciences were assimilated into Aristotelian structures. Stillman Drake noted in the introduction to his translation of Two New Sciences (1974) that Galileo was obliged to write for a ‘mixed readership’. Raphael examines not so much the mixed readership as what she describes, following Charles Schmitt, as the ‘eclectic’ reading of coherent groups of readers, reading within multiple intellectual traditions. Although she notes that she has undertaken a partial census of surviving copes of the Discorsi, Raphael does not publish her list or any details here. The ways in which the physical form of the book and its illustrations might have influenced reader responses is not discussed, nor the responses of her readers to competing publications. GERMANY Papier im mittelalterlichen Europa. Herstellung und Gebrauch. Ed. by Carla Meyer, Sandra Schulz, and Bernd Schneidmüller. (Materiale Textkulturen, 7.) Berlin, Munich, and Boston: Walter de Gruyter. 2015. vi + 330 pp., 63 figs. €79.95. isbn 978 3 11 037141 3. Also available free of charge as an e-book. Collection of valuable studies on the production and use of paper and other materials in late medieval and early modern Europe. Includes: Bernd Schneidmüller, ‘Papier im mittelalterlichen Europa’; Sandra Schultz and Johannes Follmer, ‘Von Brillen, Knoten und Wassertropfen. Auf der Suche nach Herstellungsspuren in historischen Papieren am Beispiel von Archivalien des Stadtarchivs Ravensburg’; Emanuela Di Stefano, ‘European and Mediterranean Perspectives on the Paper Produced in Camerino-Pioraco and Fabriano at the Apogee of its Medieval Development (14th–15th Century)’; Inge Van Wegens, ‘Paper Consumption and the Foundation of the First Paper Mills in the Low Countries, 13th–15th Century’; Erwin Frauenknecht, ‘Papiermühlen in Württemberg. Forschungsansätze am Beispiel der Papiermühlen in Urach und Soflingen’; Evamarie Bange, ‘Wasserzeichen als Quelle zur Wirtschaftsund Sozialgeschichte. Eine Studie am Beispiel der Luxemburger Kontenbücher’; Thomas Klinke and Carla Meyer, ‘Geknickt, zerrissen, abgegriffen. Gebrauchsspuren auf historischen Papieren und ihr kulturhistorischer Aussagewert’; FranzJosef Arlinghaus, ‘Materialität und Differenzierung der Kommunikation. Zu Funktionen des Pergament- und Papiergebrauchs in der spätmittelalterlichen Ständegesellschaft’; Hendrik van Huis, ‘Papier- und Pergamentgebrauch in den Stadtbüchern von Greifswald’; Heike Hawicks, ‘Situativer Pergament- und Papiergebrauch im späten Mittelalter. Eine Fallstudie anhand der Bestände des Stadtarchivs Duisburg und des Universitätsarchivs Heidelberg’; Paul Needham, ‘Book Production on Paper and Vellum in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries’; Birgit Kata, ‘Papier und Pappe im archäologischen Fundspektrum. Bemerkungen zu einer unterschätzten Quellengattung für die Alltagsgeschichte des Mittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit’. Werkeverzeichnis zu den Rhetorikdrucken Deutschlands, 1450–1700. Comp. by Joachim Knape. (Gratia, 59.) Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz. 2017. xxxvi + 542 pp., 28 illus. €148. isbn 978 3 447 10889 8. Autorenlexikon Deutsche Rhetoren, 1450–1700. By Joachim Knape. (Gratia, 60.) Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz. 2017. 502 pp., 72 illus. €138. isbn 978 3 447 10897 3. These two extremely useful volumes, prepared by Joachim Knape, Professor of Rhetoric at the University of Tübingen, provide comprehensive coverage of authors and writings on rhetoric in Germany up to the end of the seventeenth century. The Werkeverzeichnis describes the printed books on the subject, whether in Latin or in German, while the Autorenlexikon provides short biographies of some nine hundred German writers. All told, Knape captures details of roughly twice as many German authors, three times as many works by German writers, and about seven times as many works in the German language as were recorded in Lawrence D. Green and James J. Murphy's Renaissance Rhetoric Short-Title Catalogue, 1460–1700 (London, 2006). Die Stammbücher von Johann Georg Krünitz (1728–1796). By Carl Joachim Classen. Ed. by Roswitha Classen, in collaboration with Claus Dieter Classen, Carl Friedrich Classen, and Hans Christoph Classen. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner. 2017. xii + 392 pp. + CD-ROM. €89. isbn 978 3 515 11618 3. A study, prepared by the distinguished Göttingen classicist Carl Joachim Classen (1928–2013) and seen through the press by his relations, of the Stammbücher (autograph albums) of the physician and polyhistor Johann Georg Krünitz (1728–96), famous for founding the 242-volume Oekonomische Encyklopädie (Berlin, 1773–1858). The Stammbücher contain entries by more than 450 contemporaries, scholars, writers, physicians, officers, students and professors, mostly from Göttingen, Frankfurt/Oder, Leipzig, and Berlin, variously in Latin, German, Greek, Hebrew, French, and English, all of which throws extraordinary light on the period. The material has been scrupulously edited and translated and augmented by extensive biographical information. The accompanying CD contains reproductions of the original entries. ITALY [A list of books published in 2013. More recent publications will be listed in subsequent issues.] B come Bodoni. I caratteri di Bodoni a Brera e nella grafica contemporanea. Milan: Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense; Cinisello Balsamo: Silvana editoriale. 2013. Ed. by Andrea De Pasquale and Massimo Dradi. 95 pp. €20. ISBN 978 88 366 2659 5. Catalogue of an exhibition held at the Brera Library in Milan in May–June 2013 to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the death of Giambattista Bodoni. Una battaglia della cultura. Emanuele Casamassima e le biblioteche. By Tiziana Stagi. Rome: Associazione Italiana Biblioteche. 2013. 607 pp. €40. isbn 978 88 7812 222 2. Emanuele Casamassima (1916–88) had two careers, as a librarian and, from 1970, as a university professor of palaeography. But he is remembered mostly for a chance event, or, rather, an event that was avoidable. In April 1965 he was appointed director of the National Central Library in Florence, in a building constructed on the north bank of the Arno and opened in 1935. A year and a half later, on 4 November 1966, a devastating flood engulfed the library and a large part of its collections, which, unwisely, had been placed in the cellars. Having received no warning, Casa-massima found himself trapped on the wrong side of the river, with all communications broken, and it was only possible to reach the library, through thick, treacherous slime, on the following morning. What happened next has entered into the myth and mythology of the alluvione: the director opened the doors to the world, chainlines of ‘mud angels’ manhandled the sopping books up and out of the fango in an extraordinary rescue, and the whole operation became a prototype of modern disaster management. Although the library's catalogues were (and still are) in chaos for years as a result of the flood, in the end relatively little was lost. The National Central Library and the 1966 flood has already been described in a 2009 book by Elisa di Renzo; some of the same ground is inevitably covered in the present work, though it includes other aspects of Casamassima's career and work as a librarian, and adds a lot of new information, including an important documentary appendix. Its weakness, perhaps, is that it betrays rather too easily its origins as a Ph.D. thesis, with a plethora of footnotes and an unwillingness to leave anything out. Nevertheless it is an important biographical study of a great librarian. La biblioteca di Avraham Ben David Portaleone secondo l'inventario della sua eredità. By Gianfranco Miletto. Florence: Olschki. 2013. xii + 141 pp. €19. isbn 978 88 2226273 8. This book is an afterthought based on a chance discovery. The author some time ago completed a lengthy monograph, in German, on the figure of Avraham ben David Portaleone (1542–1612), a Hebrew writer and thinker living in Renaissance Italy. Research in the State Archive at Mantua subsequently uncovered the inventory of the goods in Portaleone's home at his death in 1612, which is the document, partly in Italian and partly in Latin (for the titles of the many books), edited here. Boccaccio in Romagna. Manoscritti, incunaboli e cinquecentine nelle biblioteche romagnole. Ed. by Paola Errani, Claudia Giuliani, and Paolo Zanfini; essays by Lorenzo Baldacchini, Alfredo Cottignoli, Donatino Domini, and Sebastiana Nobili. (Emilia Romagna biblioteche archivi, 80.) Bologna: Editrice compositori. 2013. 126 pp. €13. isbn 978 88 7794 799 4. Catalogue of an exhibition held at Ravenna in October–December 2013 and at Cesena in December 2013 – February 2014 to celebrate the 700th anniversary of the birth of Giovanni Boccaccio. Le ‘Cartare’ di Fabriano. Società donne lavoro nei tempi della città della carta. Ed. by Giancarlo Castagnari. Fabriano: Fondazione Gianfranco Fedrigoni. 2013. Available on request. isbn 978 88 908519 0 2. From early days, women found a place in the papermaking industry: the factories were often in out-of-the-way spots, in order to obtain a good water supply, and were run on a family basis (and conditions were much better than those in the French coal mines described by Zola). Women were employed as rag-sorters (stracciarole) and to sort, polish, and pack the reams of paper once they had been made; in a more modern age they also found gainful employment sewing watermarks onto the moulds or dandy rolls. As well as being more docile and more careful workers (though one essay focuses on the ‘subversive’ Elia Contenti), the attraction for employers was that they were paid less. The present volume contains eight essays and focuses, in particular, on the Miliani factory in Fabriano, which was pioneering in providing a crèche for the women who made up a third or even a half of the workforce. It also includes some interesting period photographs. De libris compactis. Legature di pregio in Piemonte. By Francesco Malaguzzi. (Legature di pregio in Piemonte, 9.) Turin: Centro Studi Piemontesi; Regione Piemonte. 2013. 121 pp. + illus. €26. isbn 978 88 8262 205 3. The present author's surveys of bookbindings in the archives and libraries of the Piedmont concludes with this ninth, last, but not least, volume dedicated to the region's capital, Turin. Some of the previous titles (but not all, to the shame of the reviewer), have been noticed in this rubric. It began long ago in 1995 with Il Canavese (see The Library, vi, 18 (1996), 363), followed by Il Biellese (1996, see 19 (1997), 388), La Valsesia (1997) and Il Vercellese (1998; see joint notice in 21 (1999), 402), Il Monferrato (2002), Il Cuneese (2006), L’Astigiano e il Torinese (2008), Il Novarese (2010), and now Torino. Despite some uneven writing and the peripatetic progress, it remains an extraordinary achievement on the part of the former executive of a petrochemical company, who celebrated his eightieth birthday in 2010 (see The Library, vii, 16 (2015), 107), and still keeps going. It therefore behoves libraries and collectors who have some volumes to complete the set. Donne cavalieri incanti follia. Viaggio attraverso le immagini dell’Orlando Furioso. Catalogo della mostra. Ed. by Lina Bolzoni and Carlo Alberto Girotto. Lucca: Maria Pacini Fazzi editore. 2012 [but 2013]. 191 pp. €25. isbn 978 88 6550 173 3. The Orlando Furioso by Ludovico Ariosto, first published in 1516, with a revised and expanded version in 1532, was not only the century's best-selling book, with a plethora of editions and translations, but it also had a huge visual impact, and continues to inspire illustration, theatre, and cinema to the present day. The present, engaging, beautifully printed, catalogue is of an exhibition held at Pisa from December 2012 to February 2013. Fondazione Luigi Firpo, Centro Studi sul Pensiero Politico, Catalogo del fondo antico. IV. R–S. Ed. by Cristina Stango and Andrea De Pasquale. Florence: Olschki. 2013. xiv + 257 pp. €85. isbn 978 88 222 6322 3. Fourth instalment, containing entries nos 3500–4183, with works by authors such as Rousseau, Sansovino, and Sarpi, of this lavish and beautifully realized catalogue of the early printed books in the Turin library of historian Luigi Firpo (1915–89). Includes a few ESTC titles, which however has not been included among the repertories cited. The previous instalments have all been dutifully noted in this rubric; see The Library, vii, 7 (2006), 221; 8 (2007), 468; 12 (2011), 311. Giovanni Battista Ciotti (1562–1627?): Publisher Extraordinary at Venice. By Dennis E. Rhodes. (Anecdota veneta, 4.) Venice: Marcianum Press. 2013. 340 pp. €32. isbn 978 88 6512 145 0. The author has a long-standing interest in this polyvalent figure of a bookseller and publisher, as is witnessed by an important article in this journal in 1987 (The Library, vi, 9, 225–39). Ciotti was perhaps the first Italian publisher to become truly pan-European in his trading, and the present work's introduction is formed by a series of short expertises, in which, in typically Rhodes fashion, it is shown that a book declared as published in Bergamo in 1587 was in fact printed in Frankfurt, and likewise that a group of thirteen editions, all claiming to be published in Cologne, were again produced in Frankfurt (something electronic repertories such as Edit16 and VD16 still have to take on board). Another short chapter deals with the fact that Ciotti not only met Giordano Bruno, but was interrogated by the Inquisition about his acquaintance, providing a valuable brief portrait of the philosopher. The volume includes a short-title listing of 764 editions published by Ciotti, or with his name, from 1583 to 1646. Inventario di bottega di Antonio Bosio veneziano (1646–1694). By Sabrina Minuzzi. (Studi di archivistica, bibliografia, paleografia.) Venice: Edizioni Ca’ Foscari. 2013. 256 pp. + illus. Available on request. isbn 978 88 97735 48 9. The discovery of the inventory post-mortem of a minor bookseller, publisher, and engraver active in Venice in the second half of the seventeenth century was the object of an earlier book by the same author: Il secolo di carta. Antonio Bosio artigiano di testi e immagini nella Venezia del Seicento (2009); at the time this rubric expressed a mild criticism, remarking that ‘it is to be regretted, perhaps, that for reasons of space we are not given a full transcription of and commentary on the inventory itself’ (see The Library, vii, 13 (2012), 492–3). The author, reproved, has kindly obliged and the full document makes fascinating reading, while the commentary and analysis, which includes listings of Bosio's known output, is excellent. It also reveals the existence of a huge printed output, not quite ephemera, mostly devotional texts, that has largely disappeared. Libraries with the previous volume therefore will need to obtain the present work as well. Liala. Una protagonista dell'editoria rosa tra romanzi e stampa periodica. Ed. by Luisa Finocchi and Ada Gigli Marchetti. (Studi e ricerche di storia dell'editoria, 59.) Milan: Franco Angeli. 2013. 207 pp. €26. isbn 978 88 568 4989 9. Liala (Li-à-la), au siècle Amalia Liana Negretti (1897–1995), married to a naval official, Pompeo Cambiasi, from whom she soon separated, but never divorced, pioneered a genre for female readers, in which the men were handsome intrepid aviators and the girls were pure and beautiful (a midway house between Biggles and Barbara Cartland). Her output of eighty-plus titles never reached the six hundred of Cartland, but both of them lived to be 98 years old. The present volume publishes the acts of a conference held at Milan University in 2011, marks an important shift in scholarly focus for genres such as the romanzo rosa, and as such is very welcome. Nonetheless, whatever the genre, facts are facts, and some things have to be got right: for instance, the supposed great love of Liala's life, pilot Vittorio Centurione Scotto (1900–26), according to an interview with her daughter, died in November 1926, while training in a seaplane for the Schneider Cup at ‘North Folk’ in the USA (p. 16); in fact the accident happened on 21 September 1926, while the race itself was held on 13 November 1926 in the Hampton Roads, of which the Norfolk Naval Station is part. The Library of the Badia Fiesolana. Intellectual History and Education under the Medici (1462–1494). By Angela Dressen. (Biblioteche e archive, 26; RICABIM. Texts and studies, 1.) Florence: Edizioni del Galluzzo. 2013. 175 pp. isbn 978 88 8450 489 0. Prior to the advent of printing, Florence was the pulsing heart of contemporary book production, a sort of manuscript Leipzig. The acquisition of power by the Medici, a family of bankers able to buy those they couldn't cow or convince, established a benign despotism that, albeit with turbulent moments (Savonarola, a short-lived republic, etc.), lasted up to the eighteenth century. Much of its success involved the provision of cultural resources, including libraries. Cosimo the elder cleared the debts incurred by Niccolò Niccoli and endowed the new public library in the convent of St Mark's with the humanist's books. As a parallel project, he also furnished with manuscripts the library of the Badia Fiorentina on the lower slopes of Fiesole, home to the Augustine order and nowadays the European University Institute. The present study, produced by a researcher and librarian working at the Villa I Tatti of Harvard University, throws new light on the history of the collection, including the edition of an inventory written c. 1464. After some three centuries, the manuscripts were acquired by Angelo Maria Bandini and rejoined those of St Mark's in the Laurentian library, ensuring that most of them can be identified today. This is a useful book describing a lesser known episode, albeit with a tendency to wander off into the wider realms of humanism, rather than concentrating on the history of the library. Some details need correction: the Ripoli press was not set up in 1476 in Bagno a Ripoli (a small town about five miles down-river from Florence); it was in the Dominican convent of San Jacopo di Ripoli, which had moved about a century previously to a site near the present-day railway station of Santa Maria Novella (p. 26). Likewise, prices between one to eight ducats for printed books would be a huge amount: most of the money indications in the Ripoli diary are for lesser coinages, i.e. lire and soldi (p. 26; see Melissa Conway, The Diario of the Printing Press of San Jacopo di Ripoli, 1476–1484: Commentary and Transcription, Florence: Olschki, 1999). Libri di scuola e mercato editoriale dal primo Ottocento alla Riforma Gentile, Ed. by Giorgio Chiosso. (Studi e ricerche di storia dell’editoria, 61.) Milan: Franco Angeli. 2013. 223 pp. €25. isbn 978 88 204 2174 8. As is commonplace in most Mediterranean countries, in Italy, even today, schoolbooks are an obligatory expense for the family, so that with the right title an author-teacher (but major writers and intellectuals often get in on the act) and a publisher can make a killing. Italy had pioneering scholastic legislation: primary schooling was made obligatory for all children in 1877, but the law was not applied and even forty years later illiteracy was around 40%, especially in the South. The present monograph brings together seven articles, originally published between 1992 and 2013, heavily revised, to form a coherent account of the market for schoolbooks from the Napoleonic period up to the early years of the Fascist regime and the radical restructuring of school programmes in the 1923 reform by Giovanni Gentile. Libri di Terra Santa. Un viaggio tra i libri antichi della Biblioteca Generale della Custodia di Terra Santa a Gerusalemme. Ed. by Alessandro Tedesco. Torrita di Siena: Società Bibliografica Toscana, in collaboration with ATS pro Terra Sancta. 2013. 157 pp. isbn 978 88 9828202 9. Catalogue of an exhibition of some of the early printed books held in the library of the Franciscan Custodia di Terra Santa, under the church of San Salvatore, in Jerusalem. I mestieri del libro nella Bologna del Settecento. By Alberto Beltramo and Maria Gioia Tavoni. (Documenta, 7.) Sala Bolognese: Arnaldo Forni editore. 2013. 300 pp. + illus. €35. isbn 978 88 271 3084 1. From 1512, and the overthrow of the Bentivoglio family, up to Italian unification in the nineteenth century, the city of Bologna was ruled over by the Church and became the university of choice of the Papal states, which included Rome. This simple fact heavily conditioned the local publishing industry, which was ample, dominated by the firm of the Dalla Volpe family, but safe and mostly erudite. The two authors have substantially reworked earlier articles, and part of a thesis, to produce this handy monograph describing the city's eighteenth-century book industry. Mobilità dei mestieri del libro tra Quattrocento e Seicento. Convegno internazionale, Roma, 14–16 marzo 2012. Ed. by Marco Santoro and Samanta Segatori. (Biblioteca di ‘Paratesto’, 8.) Pisa and Rome: Fabrizio Serra editore. 2013. 392 pp. Also available as an e-book. €125. isbn 978 88 6227 523 1. Early printers were necessarily mobile and in search of capital. So, they drifted, and in drifting they spread their technology, from Mainz to other cities in Germany, from Germany to Italy, and later France, and so on. The theme was dealt with by Konrad Haebler, with authority and perception, in a well-known book of 1924; the present volume publishes 21 papers (of which two in German and Spanish respectively, one in French and another in English) from a conference on this theme held in Rome in 2012. On the whole, there is little that is original and most of it recycles well-known information for a rather overpriced result. La nascita del diritto d'autore in Italia. Concetti, interessi, controversie giudiziarie (1840–1941). By Maria Iolanda Palazzolo. (I libri di Viella, 160.) Rome: Viella. 2013. 181 pp. €25. isbn 978 88 6728 091 9. Works with catchy titles, such as Piracy: The Intellectual Property Wars from Gutenberg to Gates (2009) by Adrian Johns (would the founder of Microsoft have been cited without the alliteration?), follow the pervading Anglo-Saxon habit of ignoring more or less everything written in other modern languages. In fact, the protection of authors’ rights developed in Continental Europe in the Renaissance, shortly after the first impact of printing, and evolved as the dominant culture shifted from Italy to France in the seventeenth century. This accurate, well-informed volume looks at how the French droit d'auteur influenced the debate in Italy in the critical and difficult years of national unification. L'Ottocento per Hducazione del popolo. Il catalogo del fondo ottocentesco Biblioteca dell'ITI Leonardo da Vinci. By Simona Vannucci and Antonella Bausi. Florence: Comune di Firenze. 2013. 423 pp. Available on request. isbn 978 88 89608 43 2. Just in case anybody is wondering, Italy likes to name schools after famous people, as a source of inspiration, and ITI (not explained herein) stands for ‘Istituto Tecnico Industriale’, or a professional school on the north side of Florence. Although relatively modern, and all nineteenth-century, an interesting collection. Pronostici e almanacchi. Studio di bibliografia romagnola. By Carlo Piancastelli, ed. by Lorenzo Baldacchini, introduction by Elide Casali. (Quaderni Piancastelli, 8.) Bologna: Il Mulino. 2013. 180 pp. €17.50. isbn 978 88 15 24757 5. Carlo Piancastelli (1867–1938) belonged to a wealthy landowning family and in his lifetime he assembled a considerable personal library, including a large collection of autographs, which he left to the city library in Forli. In particular, he had a passionate interest in popular literature and folklore, which were the main object of his own studies. This short pamphlet, first published in 1913, is here re-edited on the basis of his own copy, where the ample annotations are incorporated into the text. Scritti. Lettere, dediche, avvisi ai lettori. By Francesco Marcolini; ed. by Paolo Procaccioli. (Cinquecento. Testi e studi di letteratura italiana. Testi, 22.) Manziana (Rome): Vecchiarelli editore. 2013. 208 pp. €25. isbn 978 88 8247 335 8. On the model of the Aldine prefaces and dedications published by Giovanni Orlandi in 1975, this slender volume brings together those by Francesco Marcolini (d. 1559), a much less important figure, but nevertheless a major publisher, especially of Pietro Aretino, in sixteenth-century Venice. It integrates and extends the analogous collection of prefaces and letters by Girolamo Ruscelli, published by the same scholar in 2011 (see The Library, vii, 16 (2015), 107–8). Le seicentine della Biblioteca di Lingue e letterature moderne, vol. 1: Fondi di Italiano: Busnelli, Malagoli e Rari; Fondo Rari di Francese, Fondo Rari di Spagnolo. Ed. by Cinzia Romagnoli. Pisa: Dedizioni. 2013. €19. isbn 978 88 95613 22 2. In Italy a ‘Biblioteca Universitaria’ has little or nothing to do with the usually ancient university surrounding it, due to a major historical error in the sharing out of resources, when in 1975 the Ministry for the Cultural Heritage was fashioned out of a rib of the Ministry of Education. At a faculty and departmental level, universities have, however, built up considerable libraries, which include significant nuclei of manuscripts and early printed books, usually the outcome of gifts and legacies. Very little is known about these collections and often they are not catalogued or, worse, skilfully camouflaged in large OPACs of modern books. The present author, with dogged persistence, has already churned out three catalogues for the early books of the Faculty of Economics at Pisa University (see The Library, vii, 1 (2000), 341; 6 (2005), 479; 10 (2009), 206); she subsequently turned her attention to the Faculty of Modern Languages, publishing a catalogue of their sixteenth-century books in 2011 (see The Library, vii, 14 (2013), 102), and now follows it with that of the 75 items from the seventeenth century. Serie dell'edizioni aldine per ordine cronologico ed alfabetico. Con gli annali di Aldo il vecchio. Ed. by Piero Scapecchi. (Monumenta, 7.) Sala Bolognese: Arnaldo Forni editore. 2013. xxx + vi + 195 pp. €35. isbn 978 88 271 3080 3. Aldines have always attracted an undue amount of bibliographical attention (it's part of the myth). The first edition of the Serie dell’edizioni aldine by an anonymous compiler appeared at Pisa in 1790 and, although handy, had numerous omissions. A second edition with ‘emendazioni e giunte’ was published swiftly afterwards, at Padua in 1790, while a supposedly third edition, produced in Venice in 1791 was a slavish copy of the second. The work was taken over by the bookseller, publisher, and former Palatine librarian in Florence, Giuseppe Molini (1733–1808), who reworked it entirely for a new third edition published in 1803. The same year saw the first edition of Renouard's Annales, which put an end to any future reprints of the Serie. This useful reprint of the Molini version is accompanied by an introduction, which explains the history of this curious bibliographical episode. Sì, carta! Catalogo della mostra: novembre 2013 – febbraio 2014. Milan: Archivio di Stato. 2013. xxxii + 142 pp. Available on request. isbn 978 88 909400 0 2. Although papermaking in northern Italy was concentrated around Lake Garda, which was Venetian territory, Milan had its own mills, which supplied the city's publishing industry and numerous other needs. The present catalogue, which includes examples of sheets of paper from the thirteenth century, shows that a great deal still needs to be found out about the history of the medieval and Renaissance paper industry. Storia della Biblioteca Nazionale di Firenze (1859–1885). By Gianna Del Bono. (Bibliografia, Bibliologia, Biblioteconomia. Studi, 17.) Manziana (Rome): Vecchiarelli. 2013. 253 pp. €30. isbn 978 88 8247 340 2. What today is the National Central Library in Florence was created in 1859 by the merger of the city's Magliabechi Library, on whose history an authoritative book was published by Maria Mannelli Goggioli, La Biblioteca Magliabechiana in 2000 (see The Library, vii, 2 (2001), 297–8), and the Palatine Library in Palazzo Pitti, confiscated from the former family of ruling dukes. The two collections were brought together in the home of the Magliabechi library in the East wing of the Uffizi, which remained the library's home up to 1935 and the move to its present-day building. Merging two considerable collections meant reorganization and recataloguing on a huge scale, as well as struggling with legal deposit for the whole of Italy and the creation of a national bibliography for a new nation. The present monograph by a former librarian, based on extensive archive research, provides a new picture of this little known period in the library's history. In 1885, in order to put it on the same standing as the newly created National Central Library in Rome, the adjective ‘Central’ was added to Florence as well. What's in a name? Where libraries are concerned, often a great deal. © The Author 2018; all rights reserved This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Library Oxford University Press

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Baily’s Magazine of Sports and Pastimes: An Index and Bibliography. By Chris Harte. Carmarthen: Sports History Publishing. 2017. 380 pp. £30. isbn 978 1 898010 09 8. Available from the author (with £3 inland postage), Braemar House, St David's Avenue, Carmarthen, sa31 sdn. Between March 1860 and June 1926, 796 illustrated monthly issues of the London- based Baily's Magazine of Sports and Pastimes appeared in 125 volumes. No indoor pastimes were covered by Baily's. The sports covered were generally those needing considerable wealth to indulge in, such as hunting and horse-racing. Cricket was covered, but the working man's football was ignored and motoring was eventually to make an appearance. A curious feature of the magazine was that until 1889 each volume contained seven numbers, resulting in each volume commencing with a different month for seven years. Profiles of sportsmen, discussions about breeding polo ponies, and stirring accounts of wolf-hunting in Normandy were supplemented by serial fiction and verse on relevant topics. The introduction which deals with the history of Baily's takes the form of a long extract from the magazine's final issue with a few additions by Harte, a former sports-writer and now an enthusiastic sports historian. His later postscript outlines the sometimes fraught history of the Baily family business. There is also an 1891 extract from Baily's concerning earlier sporting periodicals. Changes to the magazine's format and contents are recorded in brief notes at the appropriate points in the index. Despite the title, this book is not an index. It is simply a massive chronological listing of contents and illustrations with the addition of identifying where possible the internal and external authors behind the pseudonyms and abbreviations. Comparing Harte's Index with the original we can see from the April 1871 issue that he helpfully identifies the pseudonyms of ‘Old Calabar’ as the suitably aristocratic Theobald de Vismes and the poet ‘Amphion’ as the scarcely better known George Tyrrell. Less helpfully he abbreviates an article's original title of ‘William Mortimer: The Master of Old Surrey’ to the much less useful ‘Portrait and Biography—William Mortimer’. A monograph on the principal writers in the magazine is promised. The lack of an index means that Harte's massive labours are somewhat difficult to access. Anyone interested in the poetry of hunting or hoping to use Baily's to trace the rise of golf will find much material of interest, but will have to do almost as much work as flicking through the actual volumes. John Sparrow, Warden of All Souls College, Oxford. By Peter Raina. Oxford: Peter Lang. 2017. xxiii + 806 pp. £80.34. isbn 978 1 78707 506 1. In 1963 John Sparrow delivered the Sandars lectures in bibliography at Cambridge. The resulting book, copiously illustrated, was published by Cambridge University Press in 1969 as Visible Words. The lectures were drawn from his own travels, especially in Italy, and very largely from books on his own shelves. It reveals a person who barely appears in the present book, which gives few details of his book collecting or its scholarly range beyond an enthusiasm for A. E. Housman. Yet collecting dominated many of his leisure hours, whether finding and swapping books with his friends (he could be a generous donor), or adding to the shelves of books bound in limp vellum, many in neo-Latin, for which he had a particular attachment. His quest for multiple copies of Mark Pattison's Memoirs was towards a project that was never completed but emerged a little in his Clark lectures on Mark Pattison and the Idea of a University. Raina's book is part biography, and part a selection of letters, many of them trivial. It traverses some familiar ground, notably the Lady Chatterley trial and debates about the place of All Souls in modern Oxford. But those who expect to learn about bibliophily, or indeed some of his closest friends, will be disappointed. He himself would have been more than disappointed in mistakes such as ‘A. E. Houseman’, or Jane (for Janet) Stone. Bernard M. Rosenthal, 5 May 1920 –14 January 2017: A Biographical and Bibliographical Account by Ian Jackson in the Style of the Dictionnaire historique et critique of Pierre Bayle (1647–1706). Berkeley, California: Printed for the Wednesday Table. 2017. 12 pp. + plate + explanatory leaflet + list of errata and addenda. $60. Available from the author at www.ianjacksonbooks.com. This act of homage to the bookseller Barney Rosenthal takes the form of an annotated reprint in large folio format of the obituary by Ian Jackson published in the San Francisco Chronicle of 22 January 2017. The Wednesday Table, the dining club for Bay Area antiquarian booksellers established by Rosenthal in the 1980s, commissioned an expanded version of this obituary to be printed as a keepsake, perhaps as a broadside, but in the end a more fitting tribute was conceived for the man whose greatest contribution to the book trade was to demonstrate the importance of glosses, commentaries, and marginal annotations in manuscripts and printed books. Taking the newspaper article of a thousand words as his textus, Jackson has liberally glossed each sentence with commentaries laid out with scrupulous fidelity to the typography and to the prose style of Pierre Bayle's famous dictionary, thereby expanding the publication to some 25,000 words, combining choice remarques with extracts from letters from Rosenthal's friends and collaborators, themselves provided with due apparatus criticus in the margins. The letterpress is typeset by Richard Seibert and complemented by a photographic portrait by Elvira Piedra as the frontispiece. A Maturing Market: The Iberian Book World in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century. Ed. by Alexander S. Wilkinson and Alejandra Ulla Lorenzo. (Library of the Written Word, 59; The Handpress World, 44.) Leiden: Brill. 2017. xv + 285 pp. €120. isbn 978 90 04 34037 4 (hardback); 978 90 04 34038 1 (e-book). Until recently, any attempt to understand the contribution of print to Iberian culture of the seventeenth century was severely constrained by the lack of co-ordinated documentation of publications after 1600. Alexander Wilkinson's foundational catalogue of Iberian Books (3 vols, Leiden, 2010–15; also freely available at iberian.ucd.ie and as part of ustc.ac.uk) enabled the analysis of publishing trends up to 1650, and a conference on the subject was held in Dublin in 2014 from which the present book derives. Includes: Alexander S. Wilkinson, ‘A Maturing Market: The Iberian Book World in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century’; César Manrique Figueroa, ‘Printing in Antwerp in the Early Seventeenth Century and its Connections with the Iberian World’; Idalia García, ‘The Importation of Books into New Spain during the Seventeenth Century’; Alejandra Ulla Lorenzo, ‘Women and the Iberian Book Trade, 1472–1650’; Sarah Malfatti, ‘The Book-Reader Relationship in Golden- Age Spain: Reading Practices and the Publishing Industry in Don Quixote’; José Maria Pérez Fernández, ‘“Reasons of State for Any Author”: Common Sense, Translation, and the International Republic of Letters’; Esther Villegas de la Torre, ‘Writing Literature for Publication, 1605–1637’; Don Cruickshank, ‘Printed Plays in Early Modern Spain’; John O’Neill, ‘Cervantes's Ocho comedias: From the Pen to the Print-Shop’; Manuel Calderón Calderón, ‘Printing Licenses and the Trade in Fiction in Spain in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century’; Aurelio Vargas Díaz- Toledo, ‘Printing Books of Chivalry in Portugal at the Beginning of the Seventeenth Century’; Hervé Baudry, ‘Medical Publishing in Portugal in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century: A Good Business?’; Henry Ettinghausen, ‘The Golden Age of the Single Event Printed Newsletter: Relaciones de sucesos, 1601–1650’; Ricard Expósito Amagat, ‘“Things Worthy of Being Known”: The Reception and Consumption of the Press in Catalonia during the First Half of the Seventeenth Century’. Reading Galileo: Scribal Technologies and the Two New Sciences. By Renée Raphael. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 2017. ix + 265 pp. $54.95. isbn 978 1 4214 2177 3. Galileo's last work, Discorsi e dimostrazioni matematiche intorno a due nuove scienze (Leiden, 1638), is regarded as a seminal work of the scientific revolution and the foundation of modern physics. Studying annotations in surviving copies and printed and manuscript sources, Renée Raphael re-examines the assumption that Galileo's own rhetoric of novelty, studying the book of nature in place of textual exegesis, meant that the book itself was read in a new way, ushering in a Kuhnian paradigm shift. Her sources are the annotations of a handful of readers close to Galileo and his milieu, Giovanni Battista Baliani, Vincenzo Viviani, and Marin Mersenne, which are well known to scholars, and Seth Ward's annotations—duplicated in Sir Christopher Wren's copy—which have not been studied in depth before. The chapters on these readers are followed by a study of two communities of ‘readers’: professors of natural philosophy at Pisa and Jesuit teachers at the Collegio Romano. Printed and manuscript lecture courses reveal how the ‘new’ sciences were assimilated into Aristotelian structures. Stillman Drake noted in the introduction to his translation of Two New Sciences (1974) that Galileo was obliged to write for a ‘mixed readership’. Raphael examines not so much the mixed readership as what she describes, following Charles Schmitt, as the ‘eclectic’ reading of coherent groups of readers, reading within multiple intellectual traditions. Although she notes that she has undertaken a partial census of surviving copes of the Discorsi, Raphael does not publish her list or any details here. The ways in which the physical form of the book and its illustrations might have influenced reader responses is not discussed, nor the responses of her readers to competing publications. GERMANY Papier im mittelalterlichen Europa. Herstellung und Gebrauch. Ed. by Carla Meyer, Sandra Schulz, and Bernd Schneidmüller. (Materiale Textkulturen, 7.) Berlin, Munich, and Boston: Walter de Gruyter. 2015. vi + 330 pp., 63 figs. €79.95. isbn 978 3 11 037141 3. Also available free of charge as an e-book. Collection of valuable studies on the production and use of paper and other materials in late medieval and early modern Europe. Includes: Bernd Schneidmüller, ‘Papier im mittelalterlichen Europa’; Sandra Schultz and Johannes Follmer, ‘Von Brillen, Knoten und Wassertropfen. Auf der Suche nach Herstellungsspuren in historischen Papieren am Beispiel von Archivalien des Stadtarchivs Ravensburg’; Emanuela Di Stefano, ‘European and Mediterranean Perspectives on the Paper Produced in Camerino-Pioraco and Fabriano at the Apogee of its Medieval Development (14th–15th Century)’; Inge Van Wegens, ‘Paper Consumption and the Foundation of the First Paper Mills in the Low Countries, 13th–15th Century’; Erwin Frauenknecht, ‘Papiermühlen in Württemberg. Forschungsansätze am Beispiel der Papiermühlen in Urach und Soflingen’; Evamarie Bange, ‘Wasserzeichen als Quelle zur Wirtschaftsund Sozialgeschichte. Eine Studie am Beispiel der Luxemburger Kontenbücher’; Thomas Klinke and Carla Meyer, ‘Geknickt, zerrissen, abgegriffen. Gebrauchsspuren auf historischen Papieren und ihr kulturhistorischer Aussagewert’; FranzJosef Arlinghaus, ‘Materialität und Differenzierung der Kommunikation. Zu Funktionen des Pergament- und Papiergebrauchs in der spätmittelalterlichen Ständegesellschaft’; Hendrik van Huis, ‘Papier- und Pergamentgebrauch in den Stadtbüchern von Greifswald’; Heike Hawicks, ‘Situativer Pergament- und Papiergebrauch im späten Mittelalter. Eine Fallstudie anhand der Bestände des Stadtarchivs Duisburg und des Universitätsarchivs Heidelberg’; Paul Needham, ‘Book Production on Paper and Vellum in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries’; Birgit Kata, ‘Papier und Pappe im archäologischen Fundspektrum. Bemerkungen zu einer unterschätzten Quellengattung für die Alltagsgeschichte des Mittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit’. Werkeverzeichnis zu den Rhetorikdrucken Deutschlands, 1450–1700. Comp. by Joachim Knape. (Gratia, 59.) Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz. 2017. xxxvi + 542 pp., 28 illus. €148. isbn 978 3 447 10889 8. Autorenlexikon Deutsche Rhetoren, 1450–1700. By Joachim Knape. (Gratia, 60.) Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz. 2017. 502 pp., 72 illus. €138. isbn 978 3 447 10897 3. These two extremely useful volumes, prepared by Joachim Knape, Professor of Rhetoric at the University of Tübingen, provide comprehensive coverage of authors and writings on rhetoric in Germany up to the end of the seventeenth century. The Werkeverzeichnis describes the printed books on the subject, whether in Latin or in German, while the Autorenlexikon provides short biographies of some nine hundred German writers. All told, Knape captures details of roughly twice as many German authors, three times as many works by German writers, and about seven times as many works in the German language as were recorded in Lawrence D. Green and James J. Murphy's Renaissance Rhetoric Short-Title Catalogue, 1460–1700 (London, 2006). Die Stammbücher von Johann Georg Krünitz (1728–1796). By Carl Joachim Classen. Ed. by Roswitha Classen, in collaboration with Claus Dieter Classen, Carl Friedrich Classen, and Hans Christoph Classen. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner. 2017. xii + 392 pp. + CD-ROM. €89. isbn 978 3 515 11618 3. A study, prepared by the distinguished Göttingen classicist Carl Joachim Classen (1928–2013) and seen through the press by his relations, of the Stammbücher (autograph albums) of the physician and polyhistor Johann Georg Krünitz (1728–96), famous for founding the 242-volume Oekonomische Encyklopädie (Berlin, 1773–1858). The Stammbücher contain entries by more than 450 contemporaries, scholars, writers, physicians, officers, students and professors, mostly from Göttingen, Frankfurt/Oder, Leipzig, and Berlin, variously in Latin, German, Greek, Hebrew, French, and English, all of which throws extraordinary light on the period. The material has been scrupulously edited and translated and augmented by extensive biographical information. The accompanying CD contains reproductions of the original entries. ITALY [A list of books published in 2013. More recent publications will be listed in subsequent issues.] B come Bodoni. I caratteri di Bodoni a Brera e nella grafica contemporanea. Milan: Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense; Cinisello Balsamo: Silvana editoriale. 2013. Ed. by Andrea De Pasquale and Massimo Dradi. 95 pp. €20. ISBN 978 88 366 2659 5. Catalogue of an exhibition held at the Brera Library in Milan in May–June 2013 to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the death of Giambattista Bodoni. Una battaglia della cultura. Emanuele Casamassima e le biblioteche. By Tiziana Stagi. Rome: Associazione Italiana Biblioteche. 2013. 607 pp. €40. isbn 978 88 7812 222 2. Emanuele Casamassima (1916–88) had two careers, as a librarian and, from 1970, as a university professor of palaeography. But he is remembered mostly for a chance event, or, rather, an event that was avoidable. In April 1965 he was appointed director of the National Central Library in Florence, in a building constructed on the north bank of the Arno and opened in 1935. A year and a half later, on 4 November 1966, a devastating flood engulfed the library and a large part of its collections, which, unwisely, had been placed in the cellars. Having received no warning, Casa-massima found himself trapped on the wrong side of the river, with all communications broken, and it was only possible to reach the library, through thick, treacherous slime, on the following morning. What happened next has entered into the myth and mythology of the alluvione: the director opened the doors to the world, chainlines of ‘mud angels’ manhandled the sopping books up and out of the fango in an extraordinary rescue, and the whole operation became a prototype of modern disaster management. Although the library's catalogues were (and still are) in chaos for years as a result of the flood, in the end relatively little was lost. The National Central Library and the 1966 flood has already been described in a 2009 book by Elisa di Renzo; some of the same ground is inevitably covered in the present work, though it includes other aspects of Casamassima's career and work as a librarian, and adds a lot of new information, including an important documentary appendix. Its weakness, perhaps, is that it betrays rather too easily its origins as a Ph.D. thesis, with a plethora of footnotes and an unwillingness to leave anything out. Nevertheless it is an important biographical study of a great librarian. La biblioteca di Avraham Ben David Portaleone secondo l'inventario della sua eredità. By Gianfranco Miletto. Florence: Olschki. 2013. xii + 141 pp. €19. isbn 978 88 2226273 8. This book is an afterthought based on a chance discovery. The author some time ago completed a lengthy monograph, in German, on the figure of Avraham ben David Portaleone (1542–1612), a Hebrew writer and thinker living in Renaissance Italy. Research in the State Archive at Mantua subsequently uncovered the inventory of the goods in Portaleone's home at his death in 1612, which is the document, partly in Italian and partly in Latin (for the titles of the many books), edited here. Boccaccio in Romagna. Manoscritti, incunaboli e cinquecentine nelle biblioteche romagnole. Ed. by Paola Errani, Claudia Giuliani, and Paolo Zanfini; essays by Lorenzo Baldacchini, Alfredo Cottignoli, Donatino Domini, and Sebastiana Nobili. (Emilia Romagna biblioteche archivi, 80.) Bologna: Editrice compositori. 2013. 126 pp. €13. isbn 978 88 7794 799 4. Catalogue of an exhibition held at Ravenna in October–December 2013 and at Cesena in December 2013 – February 2014 to celebrate the 700th anniversary of the birth of Giovanni Boccaccio. Le ‘Cartare’ di Fabriano. Società donne lavoro nei tempi della città della carta. Ed. by Giancarlo Castagnari. Fabriano: Fondazione Gianfranco Fedrigoni. 2013. Available on request. isbn 978 88 908519 0 2. From early days, women found a place in the papermaking industry: the factories were often in out-of-the-way spots, in order to obtain a good water supply, and were run on a family basis (and conditions were much better than those in the French coal mines described by Zola). Women were employed as rag-sorters (stracciarole) and to sort, polish, and pack the reams of paper once they had been made; in a more modern age they also found gainful employment sewing watermarks onto the moulds or dandy rolls. As well as being more docile and more careful workers (though one essay focuses on the ‘subversive’ Elia Contenti), the attraction for employers was that they were paid less. The present volume contains eight essays and focuses, in particular, on the Miliani factory in Fabriano, which was pioneering in providing a crèche for the women who made up a third or even a half of the workforce. It also includes some interesting period photographs. De libris compactis. Legature di pregio in Piemonte. By Francesco Malaguzzi. (Legature di pregio in Piemonte, 9.) Turin: Centro Studi Piemontesi; Regione Piemonte. 2013. 121 pp. + illus. €26. isbn 978 88 8262 205 3. The present author's surveys of bookbindings in the archives and libraries of the Piedmont concludes with this ninth, last, but not least, volume dedicated to the region's capital, Turin. Some of the previous titles (but not all, to the shame of the reviewer), have been noticed in this rubric. It began long ago in 1995 with Il Canavese (see The Library, vi, 18 (1996), 363), followed by Il Biellese (1996, see 19 (1997), 388), La Valsesia (1997) and Il Vercellese (1998; see joint notice in 21 (1999), 402), Il Monferrato (2002), Il Cuneese (2006), L’Astigiano e il Torinese (2008), Il Novarese (2010), and now Torino. Despite some uneven writing and the peripatetic progress, it remains an extraordinary achievement on the part of the former executive of a petrochemical company, who celebrated his eightieth birthday in 2010 (see The Library, vii, 16 (2015), 107), and still keeps going. It therefore behoves libraries and collectors who have some volumes to complete the set. Donne cavalieri incanti follia. Viaggio attraverso le immagini dell’Orlando Furioso. Catalogo della mostra. Ed. by Lina Bolzoni and Carlo Alberto Girotto. Lucca: Maria Pacini Fazzi editore. 2012 [but 2013]. 191 pp. €25. isbn 978 88 6550 173 3. The Orlando Furioso by Ludovico Ariosto, first published in 1516, with a revised and expanded version in 1532, was not only the century's best-selling book, with a plethora of editions and translations, but it also had a huge visual impact, and continues to inspire illustration, theatre, and cinema to the present day. The present, engaging, beautifully printed, catalogue is of an exhibition held at Pisa from December 2012 to February 2013. Fondazione Luigi Firpo, Centro Studi sul Pensiero Politico, Catalogo del fondo antico. IV. R–S. Ed. by Cristina Stango and Andrea De Pasquale. Florence: Olschki. 2013. xiv + 257 pp. €85. isbn 978 88 222 6322 3. Fourth instalment, containing entries nos 3500–4183, with works by authors such as Rousseau, Sansovino, and Sarpi, of this lavish and beautifully realized catalogue of the early printed books in the Turin library of historian Luigi Firpo (1915–89). Includes a few ESTC titles, which however has not been included among the repertories cited. The previous instalments have all been dutifully noted in this rubric; see The Library, vii, 7 (2006), 221; 8 (2007), 468; 12 (2011), 311. Giovanni Battista Ciotti (1562–1627?): Publisher Extraordinary at Venice. By Dennis E. Rhodes. (Anecdota veneta, 4.) Venice: Marcianum Press. 2013. 340 pp. €32. isbn 978 88 6512 145 0. The author has a long-standing interest in this polyvalent figure of a bookseller and publisher, as is witnessed by an important article in this journal in 1987 (The Library, vi, 9, 225–39). Ciotti was perhaps the first Italian publisher to become truly pan-European in his trading, and the present work's introduction is formed by a series of short expertises, in which, in typically Rhodes fashion, it is shown that a book declared as published in Bergamo in 1587 was in fact printed in Frankfurt, and likewise that a group of thirteen editions, all claiming to be published in Cologne, were again produced in Frankfurt (something electronic repertories such as Edit16 and VD16 still have to take on board). Another short chapter deals with the fact that Ciotti not only met Giordano Bruno, but was interrogated by the Inquisition about his acquaintance, providing a valuable brief portrait of the philosopher. The volume includes a short-title listing of 764 editions published by Ciotti, or with his name, from 1583 to 1646. Inventario di bottega di Antonio Bosio veneziano (1646–1694). By Sabrina Minuzzi. (Studi di archivistica, bibliografia, paleografia.) Venice: Edizioni Ca’ Foscari. 2013. 256 pp. + illus. Available on request. isbn 978 88 97735 48 9. The discovery of the inventory post-mortem of a minor bookseller, publisher, and engraver active in Venice in the second half of the seventeenth century was the object of an earlier book by the same author: Il secolo di carta. Antonio Bosio artigiano di testi e immagini nella Venezia del Seicento (2009); at the time this rubric expressed a mild criticism, remarking that ‘it is to be regretted, perhaps, that for reasons of space we are not given a full transcription of and commentary on the inventory itself’ (see The Library, vii, 13 (2012), 492–3). The author, reproved, has kindly obliged and the full document makes fascinating reading, while the commentary and analysis, which includes listings of Bosio's known output, is excellent. It also reveals the existence of a huge printed output, not quite ephemera, mostly devotional texts, that has largely disappeared. Libraries with the previous volume therefore will need to obtain the present work as well. Liala. Una protagonista dell'editoria rosa tra romanzi e stampa periodica. Ed. by Luisa Finocchi and Ada Gigli Marchetti. (Studi e ricerche di storia dell'editoria, 59.) Milan: Franco Angeli. 2013. 207 pp. €26. isbn 978 88 568 4989 9. Liala (Li-à-la), au siècle Amalia Liana Negretti (1897–1995), married to a naval official, Pompeo Cambiasi, from whom she soon separated, but never divorced, pioneered a genre for female readers, in which the men were handsome intrepid aviators and the girls were pure and beautiful (a midway house between Biggles and Barbara Cartland). Her output of eighty-plus titles never reached the six hundred of Cartland, but both of them lived to be 98 years old. The present volume publishes the acts of a conference held at Milan University in 2011, marks an important shift in scholarly focus for genres such as the romanzo rosa, and as such is very welcome. Nonetheless, whatever the genre, facts are facts, and some things have to be got right: for instance, the supposed great love of Liala's life, pilot Vittorio Centurione Scotto (1900–26), according to an interview with her daughter, died in November 1926, while training in a seaplane for the Schneider Cup at ‘North Folk’ in the USA (p. 16); in fact the accident happened on 21 September 1926, while the race itself was held on 13 November 1926 in the Hampton Roads, of which the Norfolk Naval Station is part. The Library of the Badia Fiesolana. Intellectual History and Education under the Medici (1462–1494). By Angela Dressen. (Biblioteche e archive, 26; RICABIM. Texts and studies, 1.) Florence: Edizioni del Galluzzo. 2013. 175 pp. isbn 978 88 8450 489 0. Prior to the advent of printing, Florence was the pulsing heart of contemporary book production, a sort of manuscript Leipzig. The acquisition of power by the Medici, a family of bankers able to buy those they couldn't cow or convince, established a benign despotism that, albeit with turbulent moments (Savonarola, a short-lived republic, etc.), lasted up to the eighteenth century. Much of its success involved the provision of cultural resources, including libraries. Cosimo the elder cleared the debts incurred by Niccolò Niccoli and endowed the new public library in the convent of St Mark's with the humanist's books. As a parallel project, he also furnished with manuscripts the library of the Badia Fiorentina on the lower slopes of Fiesole, home to the Augustine order and nowadays the European University Institute. The present study, produced by a researcher and librarian working at the Villa I Tatti of Harvard University, throws new light on the history of the collection, including the edition of an inventory written c. 1464. After some three centuries, the manuscripts were acquired by Angelo Maria Bandini and rejoined those of St Mark's in the Laurentian library, ensuring that most of them can be identified today. This is a useful book describing a lesser known episode, albeit with a tendency to wander off into the wider realms of humanism, rather than concentrating on the history of the library. Some details need correction: the Ripoli press was not set up in 1476 in Bagno a Ripoli (a small town about five miles down-river from Florence); it was in the Dominican convent of San Jacopo di Ripoli, which had moved about a century previously to a site near the present-day railway station of Santa Maria Novella (p. 26). Likewise, prices between one to eight ducats for printed books would be a huge amount: most of the money indications in the Ripoli diary are for lesser coinages, i.e. lire and soldi (p. 26; see Melissa Conway, The Diario of the Printing Press of San Jacopo di Ripoli, 1476–1484: Commentary and Transcription, Florence: Olschki, 1999). Libri di scuola e mercato editoriale dal primo Ottocento alla Riforma Gentile, Ed. by Giorgio Chiosso. (Studi e ricerche di storia dell’editoria, 61.) Milan: Franco Angeli. 2013. 223 pp. €25. isbn 978 88 204 2174 8. As is commonplace in most Mediterranean countries, in Italy, even today, schoolbooks are an obligatory expense for the family, so that with the right title an author-teacher (but major writers and intellectuals often get in on the act) and a publisher can make a killing. Italy had pioneering scholastic legislation: primary schooling was made obligatory for all children in 1877, but the law was not applied and even forty years later illiteracy was around 40%, especially in the South. The present monograph brings together seven articles, originally published between 1992 and 2013, heavily revised, to form a coherent account of the market for schoolbooks from the Napoleonic period up to the early years of the Fascist regime and the radical restructuring of school programmes in the 1923 reform by Giovanni Gentile. Libri di Terra Santa. Un viaggio tra i libri antichi della Biblioteca Generale della Custodia di Terra Santa a Gerusalemme. Ed. by Alessandro Tedesco. Torrita di Siena: Società Bibliografica Toscana, in collaboration with ATS pro Terra Sancta. 2013. 157 pp. isbn 978 88 9828202 9. Catalogue of an exhibition of some of the early printed books held in the library of the Franciscan Custodia di Terra Santa, under the church of San Salvatore, in Jerusalem. I mestieri del libro nella Bologna del Settecento. By Alberto Beltramo and Maria Gioia Tavoni. (Documenta, 7.) Sala Bolognese: Arnaldo Forni editore. 2013. 300 pp. + illus. €35. isbn 978 88 271 3084 1. From 1512, and the overthrow of the Bentivoglio family, up to Italian unification in the nineteenth century, the city of Bologna was ruled over by the Church and became the university of choice of the Papal states, which included Rome. This simple fact heavily conditioned the local publishing industry, which was ample, dominated by the firm of the Dalla Volpe family, but safe and mostly erudite. The two authors have substantially reworked earlier articles, and part of a thesis, to produce this handy monograph describing the city's eighteenth-century book industry. Mobilità dei mestieri del libro tra Quattrocento e Seicento. Convegno internazionale, Roma, 14–16 marzo 2012. Ed. by Marco Santoro and Samanta Segatori. (Biblioteca di ‘Paratesto’, 8.) Pisa and Rome: Fabrizio Serra editore. 2013. 392 pp. Also available as an e-book. €125. isbn 978 88 6227 523 1. Early printers were necessarily mobile and in search of capital. So, they drifted, and in drifting they spread their technology, from Mainz to other cities in Germany, from Germany to Italy, and later France, and so on. The theme was dealt with by Konrad Haebler, with authority and perception, in a well-known book of 1924; the present volume publishes 21 papers (of which two in German and Spanish respectively, one in French and another in English) from a conference on this theme held in Rome in 2012. On the whole, there is little that is original and most of it recycles well-known information for a rather overpriced result. La nascita del diritto d'autore in Italia. Concetti, interessi, controversie giudiziarie (1840–1941). By Maria Iolanda Palazzolo. (I libri di Viella, 160.) Rome: Viella. 2013. 181 pp. €25. isbn 978 88 6728 091 9. Works with catchy titles, such as Piracy: The Intellectual Property Wars from Gutenberg to Gates (2009) by Adrian Johns (would the founder of Microsoft have been cited without the alliteration?), follow the pervading Anglo-Saxon habit of ignoring more or less everything written in other modern languages. In fact, the protection of authors’ rights developed in Continental Europe in the Renaissance, shortly after the first impact of printing, and evolved as the dominant culture shifted from Italy to France in the seventeenth century. This accurate, well-informed volume looks at how the French droit d'auteur influenced the debate in Italy in the critical and difficult years of national unification. L'Ottocento per Hducazione del popolo. Il catalogo del fondo ottocentesco Biblioteca dell'ITI Leonardo da Vinci. By Simona Vannucci and Antonella Bausi. Florence: Comune di Firenze. 2013. 423 pp. Available on request. isbn 978 88 89608 43 2. Just in case anybody is wondering, Italy likes to name schools after famous people, as a source of inspiration, and ITI (not explained herein) stands for ‘Istituto Tecnico Industriale’, or a professional school on the north side of Florence. Although relatively modern, and all nineteenth-century, an interesting collection. Pronostici e almanacchi. Studio di bibliografia romagnola. By Carlo Piancastelli, ed. by Lorenzo Baldacchini, introduction by Elide Casali. (Quaderni Piancastelli, 8.) Bologna: Il Mulino. 2013. 180 pp. €17.50. isbn 978 88 15 24757 5. Carlo Piancastelli (1867–1938) belonged to a wealthy landowning family and in his lifetime he assembled a considerable personal library, including a large collection of autographs, which he left to the city library in Forli. In particular, he had a passionate interest in popular literature and folklore, which were the main object of his own studies. This short pamphlet, first published in 1913, is here re-edited on the basis of his own copy, where the ample annotations are incorporated into the text. Scritti. Lettere, dediche, avvisi ai lettori. By Francesco Marcolini; ed. by Paolo Procaccioli. (Cinquecento. Testi e studi di letteratura italiana. Testi, 22.) Manziana (Rome): Vecchiarelli editore. 2013. 208 pp. €25. isbn 978 88 8247 335 8. On the model of the Aldine prefaces and dedications published by Giovanni Orlandi in 1975, this slender volume brings together those by Francesco Marcolini (d. 1559), a much less important figure, but nevertheless a major publisher, especially of Pietro Aretino, in sixteenth-century Venice. It integrates and extends the analogous collection of prefaces and letters by Girolamo Ruscelli, published by the same scholar in 2011 (see The Library, vii, 16 (2015), 107–8). Le seicentine della Biblioteca di Lingue e letterature moderne, vol. 1: Fondi di Italiano: Busnelli, Malagoli e Rari; Fondo Rari di Francese, Fondo Rari di Spagnolo. Ed. by Cinzia Romagnoli. Pisa: Dedizioni. 2013. €19. isbn 978 88 95613 22 2. In Italy a ‘Biblioteca Universitaria’ has little or nothing to do with the usually ancient university surrounding it, due to a major historical error in the sharing out of resources, when in 1975 the Ministry for the Cultural Heritage was fashioned out of a rib of the Ministry of Education. At a faculty and departmental level, universities have, however, built up considerable libraries, which include significant nuclei of manuscripts and early printed books, usually the outcome of gifts and legacies. Very little is known about these collections and often they are not catalogued or, worse, skilfully camouflaged in large OPACs of modern books. The present author, with dogged persistence, has already churned out three catalogues for the early books of the Faculty of Economics at Pisa University (see The Library, vii, 1 (2000), 341; 6 (2005), 479; 10 (2009), 206); she subsequently turned her attention to the Faculty of Modern Languages, publishing a catalogue of their sixteenth-century books in 2011 (see The Library, vii, 14 (2013), 102), and now follows it with that of the 75 items from the seventeenth century. Serie dell'edizioni aldine per ordine cronologico ed alfabetico. Con gli annali di Aldo il vecchio. Ed. by Piero Scapecchi. (Monumenta, 7.) Sala Bolognese: Arnaldo Forni editore. 2013. xxx + vi + 195 pp. €35. isbn 978 88 271 3080 3. Aldines have always attracted an undue amount of bibliographical attention (it's part of the myth). The first edition of the Serie dell’edizioni aldine by an anonymous compiler appeared at Pisa in 1790 and, although handy, had numerous omissions. A second edition with ‘emendazioni e giunte’ was published swiftly afterwards, at Padua in 1790, while a supposedly third edition, produced in Venice in 1791 was a slavish copy of the second. The work was taken over by the bookseller, publisher, and former Palatine librarian in Florence, Giuseppe Molini (1733–1808), who reworked it entirely for a new third edition published in 1803. The same year saw the first edition of Renouard's Annales, which put an end to any future reprints of the Serie. This useful reprint of the Molini version is accompanied by an introduction, which explains the history of this curious bibliographical episode. Sì, carta! Catalogo della mostra: novembre 2013 – febbraio 2014. Milan: Archivio di Stato. 2013. xxxii + 142 pp. Available on request. isbn 978 88 909400 0 2. Although papermaking in northern Italy was concentrated around Lake Garda, which was Venetian territory, Milan had its own mills, which supplied the city's publishing industry and numerous other needs. The present catalogue, which includes examples of sheets of paper from the thirteenth century, shows that a great deal still needs to be found out about the history of the medieval and Renaissance paper industry. Storia della Biblioteca Nazionale di Firenze (1859–1885). By Gianna Del Bono. (Bibliografia, Bibliologia, Biblioteconomia. Studi, 17.) Manziana (Rome): Vecchiarelli. 2013. 253 pp. €30. isbn 978 88 8247 340 2. What today is the National Central Library in Florence was created in 1859 by the merger of the city's Magliabechi Library, on whose history an authoritative book was published by Maria Mannelli Goggioli, La Biblioteca Magliabechiana in 2000 (see The Library, vii, 2 (2001), 297–8), and the Palatine Library in Palazzo Pitti, confiscated from the former family of ruling dukes. The two collections were brought together in the home of the Magliabechi library in the East wing of the Uffizi, which remained the library's home up to 1935 and the move to its present-day building. Merging two considerable collections meant reorganization and recataloguing on a huge scale, as well as struggling with legal deposit for the whole of Italy and the creation of a national bibliography for a new nation. The present monograph by a former librarian, based on extensive archive research, provides a new picture of this little known period in the library's history. In 1885, in order to put it on the same standing as the newly created National Central Library in Rome, the adjective ‘Central’ was added to Florence as well. What's in a name? Where libraries are concerned, often a great deal. © The Author 2018; all rights reserved This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

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The LibraryOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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