Rate of muscle contraction is associated with cognition in women, not in men

Rate of muscle contraction is associated with cognition in women, not in men Abstract Background In older persons, lower hand grip strength is associated with poorer cognition. Little is known about how the rate of muscle contraction relates to cognition and upper extremity motor function, and sex differences are understudied. Methods Linear regression, adjusting for age, race, education, body mass index, appendicular lean mass, and knee pain assessed sex-specific cross-sectional associations of peak torque, rate of torque development (RTD) and rate of velocity development (RVD) with cognition and upper extremity motor function. Results In men (n=447), higher rate-adjusted peak torque and a greater RVD were associated with faster simple finger tapping speed, and a greater RVD was associated with higher nondominant pegboard performance. In women (n=447), higher peak torque was not associated with any measures, but a greater RTD was associated with faster simple tapping speed and higher language performance, and a greater RVD was associated with higher executive function, attention, memory, and nondominant pegboard performance. In women with low isokinetic peak torque, RVD was associated with attention and memory. Conclusions RVD capacity may reflect neural health, especially in women with low muscle strength. cognition, muscle, sex differences Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2018. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical Sciences Oxford University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/rate-of-muscle-contraction-is-associated-with-cognition-in-women-not-kkgGYRO9YK
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2018. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
ISSN
1079-5006
eISSN
1758-535X
D.O.I.
10.1093/gerona/gly115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background In older persons, lower hand grip strength is associated with poorer cognition. Little is known about how the rate of muscle contraction relates to cognition and upper extremity motor function, and sex differences are understudied. Methods Linear regression, adjusting for age, race, education, body mass index, appendicular lean mass, and knee pain assessed sex-specific cross-sectional associations of peak torque, rate of torque development (RTD) and rate of velocity development (RVD) with cognition and upper extremity motor function. Results In men (n=447), higher rate-adjusted peak torque and a greater RVD were associated with faster simple finger tapping speed, and a greater RVD was associated with higher nondominant pegboard performance. In women (n=447), higher peak torque was not associated with any measures, but a greater RTD was associated with faster simple tapping speed and higher language performance, and a greater RVD was associated with higher executive function, attention, memory, and nondominant pegboard performance. In women with low isokinetic peak torque, RVD was associated with attention and memory. Conclusions RVD capacity may reflect neural health, especially in women with low muscle strength. cognition, muscle, sex differences Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2018. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

Journal

The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical SciencesOxford University Press

Published: May 8, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off