Rapid accumulation of glutathione during light stress in Arabidopsis

Rapid accumulation of glutathione during light stress in Arabidopsis Abstract Environmental stress conditions can drastically affect plant growth and productivity. In contrast to soil moisture or salinity that can gradually change over a period of days or weeks, changes in light intensity or temperature can occur very rapidly, sometimes over the course of minutes or seconds. We previously reported that in response to rapid changes in light intensity (0-60 sec), Arabidopsis thaliana plants mount a large-scale transcriptomic response that includes several different transcripts essential for light stress acclimation. Here, we expand our analysis of the rapid response of Arabidopsis to light stress using a metabolomics approach and identify 111 metabolites that significantly alter in their level during the first 90 sec of light stress exposure. We further show that the levels of free and total glutathione accumulate rapidly during light stress in Arabidopsis and that the accumulation of total glutathione during light stress is associated with an increase in nitric oxide (NO) levels. We further suggest that the increase in precursors for glutathione biosynthesis could be linked to alterations in photorespiration, and that phosphoenolpyruvate could represent a major energy and carbon source for rapid metabolic responses. Taken together, our analysis could be used as an initial road map for the identification of different pathways that could be used to augment the rapid response of plants to abiotic stress. In addition, it highlights the important role of glutathione in these responses. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant and Cell Physiology Oxford University Press

Rapid accumulation of glutathione during light stress in Arabidopsis

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/rapid-accumulation-of-glutathione-during-light-stress-in-arabidopsis-ssAp6s6Krf
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0032-0781
eISSN
1471-9053
D.O.I.
10.1093/pcp/pcy101
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Environmental stress conditions can drastically affect plant growth and productivity. In contrast to soil moisture or salinity that can gradually change over a period of days or weeks, changes in light intensity or temperature can occur very rapidly, sometimes over the course of minutes or seconds. We previously reported that in response to rapid changes in light intensity (0-60 sec), Arabidopsis thaliana plants mount a large-scale transcriptomic response that includes several different transcripts essential for light stress acclimation. Here, we expand our analysis of the rapid response of Arabidopsis to light stress using a metabolomics approach and identify 111 metabolites that significantly alter in their level during the first 90 sec of light stress exposure. We further show that the levels of free and total glutathione accumulate rapidly during light stress in Arabidopsis and that the accumulation of total glutathione during light stress is associated with an increase in nitric oxide (NO) levels. We further suggest that the increase in precursors for glutathione biosynthesis could be linked to alterations in photorespiration, and that phosphoenolpyruvate could represent a major energy and carbon source for rapid metabolic responses. Taken together, our analysis could be used as an initial road map for the identification of different pathways that could be used to augment the rapid response of plants to abiotic stress. In addition, it highlights the important role of glutathione in these responses. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Plant and Cell PhysiologyOxford University Press

Published: May 25, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off