Preparing for War: The Emergence of the Modern U.S. Army, 1815–1917

Preparing for War: The Emergence of the Modern U.S. Army, 1815–1917 1048 The Journal of American History March 2018 61). Neiberg pushes the evidence beyond what and Mexican War veteran whose character was it can possibly reveal. The story of American hardly formed by then eight months of Civil intervention in 1917 lies in the purposes of War. More prewar generation than not, Casey numerous, discrete actors who chose war and nonetheless updated Hardee’s manual in part helped remake a nation. to answer regulars’, volunteers’, and militias’ demands for clarity in brigade-level drill ex - Richard Gamble ecution. Casey exemplifies a prewar genera - Hillsdale College tion officer responding to the Civil War gen - Hillsdale, Michigan eration’s concern; they were not “talking past doi: 10.1093/jahist/jax498 each other.” Clark argues that generational friction was Preparing for War: The Emergence of the Mod - specifically evident during the service upheav - ern U.S. Army, 1815–1917. By J. P. Clark. als of 1861 and 1898. He suggests that the (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2017. two years represent identifiable markers where xiv, 336 pp. $39.95.) generationally dissimilar officers collided over the trajectory of War Department policy Preparing for War, by J. P. Clark, employs a and pace of change. But Clark’s generational “generational lens” to explain complex U.S. groupings are problematic. While he claims Army transformation initiatives from th -e Civ that each had a “distinct character,” the core il War to World War I (p. x). Clark contends beliefs that distinguish one from another are that a generationally disparate officer corps not defined (p. 5). That his generations less quarreled for years over how to progress. To the Progressives lacked a “single set of views” the author, three “natural generations -” of of acknowledges the dubiousness of classifying ficers dominated the era—people ending their people by war participation alone (pp. 5–6). service before the Civil War, persons shaped Remarkably, the author fails to identify how by the war itself, and individuals who entered many officers comprised each generation, the the service afterward (p. 6). These generations number who advocated army transformation, not only were characterized by wartim - e ex and what this means empirically. We are left to perience but were also affected by America’s ponder selected period-specific personal vie - w transformation from agriculture dominance points without adequate justification as to why to industrialization. A fourth “progressive an author exemplified a particular generation’s generation,” which Clark approximates to stance. 1889, carried forward into World W ibi ar I ( d.). Clark unsurprisingly finds that certain Because each group was unique in outlook, “forces” pulled the army’s leadership along the contesting factions often clashed over how to road to reform (p. 276). Indeed, top- driv en prepare the service for war. When generations pressure changed the War Department far overlapped, disagreeing officers were prone to more than a few officers opining within the “talk past each other, not realizing th-eir dif chain of command. Clark’s contribution is r - e ferent views,” while provoking “confusion, stating the conventional narrative in a clever discord, and mistrust” (p. xi). way, albeit with overreached analysis. Harvard Clark’s generational methodology echoes University Press’s failure to allow for a bibliog - Judith Hicks StiehmThe G ’s enerations of U.S. raphy is disappointing. Enlisted Women (1985). Although his topic is as much military sociology as history, her Walter Kretchik work is uncited. This oversight raises questions Western Illinois University about Clark’s research fastidiousness while fur - Macomb, Illinois ther accentuating his glaring omission of the doi: 10.1093/jahist/jax499 War Department’s replacement of the 1855 William Hardee infantry drill manual with Silas Casey’s version in January 1862. At the Pershing’s Crusaders:  The American Soldier in time, Casey was a fifty-four-year-old Seminole World War I. By Richard S. Faulkne (rL . aw- Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jah/article-abstract/104/4/1048/4932676 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of American History Oxford University Press

Preparing for War: The Emergence of the Modern U.S. Army, 1815–1917

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ou_press/preparing-for-war-the-emergence-of-the-modern-u-s-army-1815-1917-1D7j0BJ6Ig
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Organization of American Historians. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
0021-8723
eISSN
1945-2314
D.O.I.
10.1093/jahist/jax499
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1048 The Journal of American History March 2018 61). Neiberg pushes the evidence beyond what and Mexican War veteran whose character was it can possibly reveal. The story of American hardly formed by then eight months of Civil intervention in 1917 lies in the purposes of War. More prewar generation than not, Casey numerous, discrete actors who chose war and nonetheless updated Hardee’s manual in part helped remake a nation. to answer regulars’, volunteers’, and militias’ demands for clarity in brigade-level drill ex - Richard Gamble ecution. Casey exemplifies a prewar genera - Hillsdale College tion officer responding to the Civil War gen - Hillsdale, Michigan eration’s concern; they were not “talking past doi: 10.1093/jahist/jax498 each other.” Clark argues that generational friction was Preparing for War: The Emergence of the Mod - specifically evident during the service upheav - ern U.S. Army, 1815–1917. By J. P. Clark. als of 1861 and 1898. He suggests that the (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2017. two years represent identifiable markers where xiv, 336 pp. $39.95.) generationally dissimilar officers collided over the trajectory of War Department policy Preparing for War, by J. P. Clark, employs a and pace of change. But Clark’s generational “generational lens” to explain complex U.S. groupings are problematic. While he claims Army transformation initiatives from th -e Civ that each had a “distinct character,” the core il War to World War I (p. x). Clark contends beliefs that distinguish one from another are that a generationally disparate officer corps not defined (p. 5). That his generations less quarreled for years over how to progress. To the Progressives lacked a “single set of views” the author, three “natural generations -” of of acknowledges the dubiousness of classifying ficers dominated the era—people ending their people by war participation alone (pp. 5–6). service before the Civil War, persons shaped Remarkably, the author fails to identify how by the war itself, and individuals who entered many officers comprised each generation, the the service afterward (p. 6). These generations number who advocated army transformation, not only were characterized by wartim - e ex and what this means empirically. We are left to perience but were also affected by America’s ponder selected period-specific personal vie - w transformation from agriculture dominance points without adequate justification as to why to industrialization. A fourth “progressive an author exemplified a particular generation’s generation,” which Clark approximates to stance. 1889, carried forward into World W ibi ar I ( d.). Clark unsurprisingly finds that certain Because each group was unique in outlook, “forces” pulled the army’s leadership along the contesting factions often clashed over how to road to reform (p. 276). Indeed, top- driv en prepare the service for war. When generations pressure changed the War Department far overlapped, disagreeing officers were prone to more than a few officers opining within the “talk past each other, not realizing th-eir dif chain of command. Clark’s contribution is r - e ferent views,” while provoking “confusion, stating the conventional narrative in a clever discord, and mistrust” (p. xi). way, albeit with overreached analysis. Harvard Clark’s generational methodology echoes University Press’s failure to allow for a bibliog - Judith Hicks StiehmThe G ’s enerations of U.S. raphy is disappointing. Enlisted Women (1985). Although his topic is as much military sociology as history, her Walter Kretchik work is uncited. This oversight raises questions Western Illinois University about Clark’s research fastidiousness while fur - Macomb, Illinois ther accentuating his glaring omission of the doi: 10.1093/jahist/jax499 War Department’s replacement of the 1855 William Hardee infantry drill manual with Silas Casey’s version in January 1862. At the Pershing’s Crusaders:  The American Soldier in time, Casey was a fifty-four-year-old Seminole World War I. By Richard S. Faulkne (rL . aw- Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jah/article-abstract/104/4/1048/4932676 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

Journal

The Journal of American HistoryOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off