Predicting drug-induced liver injury using ensemble learning methods and molecular fingerprints

Predicting drug-induced liver injury using ensemble learning methods and molecular fingerprints Abstract Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern in the drug-development process, and various methods have been proposed to predict the hepatotoxicity of compounds during the early stages of drug trials. In this study, we developed an ensemble model using three machine learning algorithms and 12 molecular fingerprints from a dataset containing 1,241 diverse compounds. The ensemble model achieved an average accuracy of 71.1±2.6%, sensitivity of 79.9±3.6%, specificity of 60.3±4.8%, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.764±0.026 in five-fold cross-validation and an accuracy of 84.3%, sensitivity of 86.9%, specificity of 75.4%, and AUC of 0.904 in an external validation dataset of 286 compounds collected from the Liver Toxicity Knowledge Base (LTKB). Compared with previous methods, the ensemble model achieved relatively high accuracy and sensitivity. We also identified several substructures related to DILI. In addition, we provide a web server offering access to our models (http://ccsipb.lnu.edu.cn/toxicity/HepatoPred-EL/). DILI, hepatotoxicity, molecular fingerprints, machine learning, ensemble © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Toxicological Sciences Oxford University Press

Predicting drug-induced liver injury using ensemble learning methods and molecular fingerprints

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1096-6080
eISSN
1096-0929
D.O.I.
10.1093/toxsci/kfy121
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern in the drug-development process, and various methods have been proposed to predict the hepatotoxicity of compounds during the early stages of drug trials. In this study, we developed an ensemble model using three machine learning algorithms and 12 molecular fingerprints from a dataset containing 1,241 diverse compounds. The ensemble model achieved an average accuracy of 71.1±2.6%, sensitivity of 79.9±3.6%, specificity of 60.3±4.8%, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.764±0.026 in five-fold cross-validation and an accuracy of 84.3%, sensitivity of 86.9%, specificity of 75.4%, and AUC of 0.904 in an external validation dataset of 286 compounds collected from the Liver Toxicity Knowledge Base (LTKB). Compared with previous methods, the ensemble model achieved relatively high accuracy and sensitivity. We also identified several substructures related to DILI. In addition, we provide a web server offering access to our models (http://ccsipb.lnu.edu.cn/toxicity/HepatoPred-EL/). DILI, hepatotoxicity, molecular fingerprints, machine learning, ensemble © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Toxicological SciencesOxford University Press

Published: May 21, 2018

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