Orthodontic Applications of Biomaterials: A Clinical Guide

Orthodontic Applications of Biomaterials: A Clinical Guide European Journal of Orthodontics, 2018, 113–114 doi:10.1093/ejo/cjx048 Advance Access publication 9 August 2017 Book Reviews Theodore Eliades and William A. Brantley, editors. Orthodontic Applications of Biomaterials: A Clinical Guide. 1st edition, Mathew Deans: UK, ISBN: 978-0-08-100383-1, pages: 293. This book sets out to inform, educate and remind, clinicians of the This book also provides an excellent summary of recent studies breadth of everyday orthodontic dental materials available. It pro- and the clinical implications of their findings. Of particular inter - vides scientific reasoning and recent research findings to evidence est to me was Chapter 12, which reviewed the clinical evidence for base the use of certain archwires, brackets, adhesives and cements. orthodontic bond failure and associated factors. By and large, information is presented in an easy to read man- The bibliography provided at the end of each chapter serves as ner, however, certain chapters, for example the chapter covering an excellent reference resource and the combination of science and structure / property relationships in orthodontic polymers, were clinical application ensures that this book will appeal to all ortho- set at a high level. There is an assumption that the reader has a dontists, wherever their interests lie. basic understanding of material science and therefore, this is not a In summary, this book certainly does provide a comprehensive book to recommend to those at the beginning of their orthodontic yet concise, independent and clinically orientated guide to the appli- training. cation of orthodontic materials. I  would recommend it to those The inclusion of sections on poor research design highlights the orthodontists that wish to consolidate their knowledge of materials importance of interpreting presented research findings and data with science, and those keen to understand the current evidence base for caution. There are helpful recommendations of how to overcome the orthodontic dental materials used in day-to-day clinical practice. challenges of interpreting the evidence, which might be of particular interest to those carrying out clinical research and trials. Natasha S. Wright European Journal of Orthodontics, 2018, 113 doi:10.1093/ejo/cjx075 Advance Access publication 2 November 2017 Digital planning and custom orthodontic treatment Editors: K. Hero Breuning and Chung H. Kau Publisher: Wiley Blackwell Price: £ 100 ISBN: 978-1-119-08777-9 This interesting book comes at the right time coinciding with the increas- be used to provide a greater understanding of the stomatognathic ing use of digital technology and customized appliances in orthodontics. system and for the diagnosis and treatment of TMJ disorders. The initial chapters provide a good overview and comparison between Further chapters introduce dedicated software programmes intraoral scanners and traditional impression taking procedures, outlin- such as 3Shape’s Ortho-Analyser to analyse digital dental models, ing the technological innovations, and the benefits to patients. 2D and 3D radiographs, facial scans as well as recording of speech. The authors note that there is an increase in popularity of 3D The authors also discuss the implementation of customized radiographic imaging is due a reduced radiation burden for the design and manufacture of orthodontic appliances, aligners, arch- patient compared to the previous 3D-imaging techniques. wires, transfer trays, lingual orthodontic appliances, and retainers. The next step following from the acquisition of 3D facial and The authors predict that these technological advances will result in dental data is the digital setup, which the authors propose to be a major advantages to our patients by reducing the need for wire bend- valuable diagnostic tool for treatment planning difficult, often multi - ing and bracket repositioning during orthodontic treatment. They disciplinary cases. The technology can also be used to improve com- theorize that the techniques described will lead to reduced treatment munication between patients and clinicians. time and improvement in outcome of orthodontic treatment results. 3D radiographic images can be combined with 3D facial photos Indirect bonding procedures are also discussed. Interestingly, the use and these can in turn be used for analysis of the facial structures of digital scans and software programmes to monitor tooth move- and Visualised Treatment predictions can be undertaken using those ment is put forward in conjunction with routine dental monitoring combined images. According to the authors, the 3D data can also applications (apps). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ejo/article-abstract/40/1/113/4080136 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The European Journal of Orthodontics Oxford University Press

Orthodontic Applications of Biomaterials: A Clinical Guide

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Oxford University Press
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© The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
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0141-5387
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1460-2210
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10.1093/ejo/cjx048
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Abstract

European Journal of Orthodontics, 2018, 113–114 doi:10.1093/ejo/cjx048 Advance Access publication 9 August 2017 Book Reviews Theodore Eliades and William A. Brantley, editors. Orthodontic Applications of Biomaterials: A Clinical Guide. 1st edition, Mathew Deans: UK, ISBN: 978-0-08-100383-1, pages: 293. This book sets out to inform, educate and remind, clinicians of the This book also provides an excellent summary of recent studies breadth of everyday orthodontic dental materials available. It pro- and the clinical implications of their findings. Of particular inter - vides scientific reasoning and recent research findings to evidence est to me was Chapter 12, which reviewed the clinical evidence for base the use of certain archwires, brackets, adhesives and cements. orthodontic bond failure and associated factors. By and large, information is presented in an easy to read man- The bibliography provided at the end of each chapter serves as ner, however, certain chapters, for example the chapter covering an excellent reference resource and the combination of science and structure / property relationships in orthodontic polymers, were clinical application ensures that this book will appeal to all ortho- set at a high level. There is an assumption that the reader has a dontists, wherever their interests lie. basic understanding of material science and therefore, this is not a In summary, this book certainly does provide a comprehensive book to recommend to those at the beginning of their orthodontic yet concise, independent and clinically orientated guide to the appli- training. cation of orthodontic materials. I  would recommend it to those The inclusion of sections on poor research design highlights the orthodontists that wish to consolidate their knowledge of materials importance of interpreting presented research findings and data with science, and those keen to understand the current evidence base for caution. There are helpful recommendations of how to overcome the orthodontic dental materials used in day-to-day clinical practice. challenges of interpreting the evidence, which might be of particular interest to those carrying out clinical research and trials. Natasha S. Wright European Journal of Orthodontics, 2018, 113 doi:10.1093/ejo/cjx075 Advance Access publication 2 November 2017 Digital planning and custom orthodontic treatment Editors: K. Hero Breuning and Chung H. Kau Publisher: Wiley Blackwell Price: £ 100 ISBN: 978-1-119-08777-9 This interesting book comes at the right time coinciding with the increas- be used to provide a greater understanding of the stomatognathic ing use of digital technology and customized appliances in orthodontics. system and for the diagnosis and treatment of TMJ disorders. The initial chapters provide a good overview and comparison between Further chapters introduce dedicated software programmes intraoral scanners and traditional impression taking procedures, outlin- such as 3Shape’s Ortho-Analyser to analyse digital dental models, ing the technological innovations, and the benefits to patients. 2D and 3D radiographs, facial scans as well as recording of speech. The authors note that there is an increase in popularity of 3D The authors also discuss the implementation of customized radiographic imaging is due a reduced radiation burden for the design and manufacture of orthodontic appliances, aligners, arch- patient compared to the previous 3D-imaging techniques. wires, transfer trays, lingual orthodontic appliances, and retainers. The next step following from the acquisition of 3D facial and The authors predict that these technological advances will result in dental data is the digital setup, which the authors propose to be a major advantages to our patients by reducing the need for wire bend- valuable diagnostic tool for treatment planning difficult, often multi - ing and bracket repositioning during orthodontic treatment. They disciplinary cases. The technology can also be used to improve com- theorize that the techniques described will lead to reduced treatment munication between patients and clinicians. time and improvement in outcome of orthodontic treatment results. 3D radiographic images can be combined with 3D facial photos Indirect bonding procedures are also discussed. Interestingly, the use and these can in turn be used for analysis of the facial structures of digital scans and software programmes to monitor tooth move- and Visualised Treatment predictions can be undertaken using those ment is put forward in conjunction with routine dental monitoring combined images. According to the authors, the 3D data can also applications (apps). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/ejo/article-abstract/40/1/113/4080136 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

Journal

The European Journal of OrthodonticsOxford University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2018

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