Notes on the Contributors

Notes on the Contributors Todd Butler is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of English at Washington State University. He is the author of Imagination and Politics in Seventeenth-Century England (Ashgate, 2008) as well as of numerous articles on the intersections of law, early modern literature and political history in such journals as Studies in English Literature, Journal of British Studies, Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Toronto Quarterly and Milton Studies. He has recently completed a monograph-length project on deliberation and political change in seventeenth-century literature. Andrea Frisch teaches French and Comparative Literature at the University of Maryland. Her most recent book, Forgetting Differences: Tragedy, Historiography and the French Wars of Religion (Edinburgh University Press, 2015), studies the rhetoric of reconciliation in the wake of France’s civil wars. Her newest book project, Fictions of Religious War in Early Modern France and Germany, is a comparative examination of the ways in which memories of the European religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were transmitted through literary and historiographical works in the centuries after the Edict of Nantes. Rachel E. Holmes is a postdoctoral researcher on the ERC-funded project Crossroads of Knowledge in Early Modern England: The Place of Literature (CRASSH and the Faculty of English, University of Cambridge), and a Research Fellow of Wolfson College, Cambridge. She works transnationally on early modern European Law and Literature, with a particular focus on marriage and the problematic status of proof in sexual matters. She is currently revising for publication a monograph on clandestine contracts in early modern European law and literature, which argues that the popularity of the clandestine marriage plot in literature corresponds closely to legal debates. Toria Johnson is a lecturer in Early Modern English Literature at the University of Birmingham. Her areas of expertise include early modern drama and culture, the history of emotions, and the works of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Her primary research interrogates the effect of the Reformation on English emotional culture, with a specific focus on the role of pity and compassion in defining English understandings of subjectivity and ‘social’ emotion. She is currently completing a monograph entitled ‘Piteous Overthrows’: Pity and Identity in Early Modern English Drama. Michael Scham is Professor of Spanish at the University of St Thomas (Minnesota). He is the author of Lector Ludens: The Representation of Games and Play in Cervantes (University of Toronto Press, 2014). His research interests include the origins of the novel, humour, play, law and literature, and tango and its literary contexts. He is currently working on early modern Spanish influences on tango lyrics. Richard Stacey is University Teacher in English 1500–1700 at the University of Glasgow. He has published on Shakespeare and is currently working on a monograph which explores the relationship between structure and speech acts in early modern drama. Jackie Watson completed her PhD at Birkbeck College, London, looking at the life of the Jacobean courtier Sir Thomas Overbury, and examining representations of courtiership on stage between 1599 and 1613. She is co-editor of The Senses in Early Modern England, 1558–1660 (Manchester University Press, 2015), and contributed a chapter on the deceptive nature of sight. Recent published articles looked at the early modern Inns of Court, Innsmen in playhouse audiences, and London topography.  She is currently working on a monograph with a focus on epistolarity, courtiership and the Jacobean playhouse, which includes an edited collection of Overbury’s letters. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Court of the University of St Andrews. All rights reserved. The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland: No. SC013532. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forum for Modern Language Studies Oxford University Press

Notes on the Contributors

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Court of the University of St Andrews. All rights reserved. The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland: No. SC013532.
ISSN
0015-8518
eISSN
1471-6860
D.O.I.
10.1093/fmls/cqx084
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Todd Butler is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of English at Washington State University. He is the author of Imagination and Politics in Seventeenth-Century England (Ashgate, 2008) as well as of numerous articles on the intersections of law, early modern literature and political history in such journals as Studies in English Literature, Journal of British Studies, Huntington Library Quarterly, University of Toronto Quarterly and Milton Studies. He has recently completed a monograph-length project on deliberation and political change in seventeenth-century literature. Andrea Frisch teaches French and Comparative Literature at the University of Maryland. Her most recent book, Forgetting Differences: Tragedy, Historiography and the French Wars of Religion (Edinburgh University Press, 2015), studies the rhetoric of reconciliation in the wake of France’s civil wars. Her newest book project, Fictions of Religious War in Early Modern France and Germany, is a comparative examination of the ways in which memories of the European religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were transmitted through literary and historiographical works in the centuries after the Edict of Nantes. Rachel E. Holmes is a postdoctoral researcher on the ERC-funded project Crossroads of Knowledge in Early Modern England: The Place of Literature (CRASSH and the Faculty of English, University of Cambridge), and a Research Fellow of Wolfson College, Cambridge. She works transnationally on early modern European Law and Literature, with a particular focus on marriage and the problematic status of proof in sexual matters. She is currently revising for publication a monograph on clandestine contracts in early modern European law and literature, which argues that the popularity of the clandestine marriage plot in literature corresponds closely to legal debates. Toria Johnson is a lecturer in Early Modern English Literature at the University of Birmingham. Her areas of expertise include early modern drama and culture, the history of emotions, and the works of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. Her primary research interrogates the effect of the Reformation on English emotional culture, with a specific focus on the role of pity and compassion in defining English understandings of subjectivity and ‘social’ emotion. She is currently completing a monograph entitled ‘Piteous Overthrows’: Pity and Identity in Early Modern English Drama. Michael Scham is Professor of Spanish at the University of St Thomas (Minnesota). He is the author of Lector Ludens: The Representation of Games and Play in Cervantes (University of Toronto Press, 2014). His research interests include the origins of the novel, humour, play, law and literature, and tango and its literary contexts. He is currently working on early modern Spanish influences on tango lyrics. Richard Stacey is University Teacher in English 1500–1700 at the University of Glasgow. He has published on Shakespeare and is currently working on a monograph which explores the relationship between structure and speech acts in early modern drama. Jackie Watson completed her PhD at Birkbeck College, London, looking at the life of the Jacobean courtier Sir Thomas Overbury, and examining representations of courtiership on stage between 1599 and 1613. She is co-editor of The Senses in Early Modern England, 1558–1660 (Manchester University Press, 2015), and contributed a chapter on the deceptive nature of sight. Recent published articles looked at the early modern Inns of Court, Innsmen in playhouse audiences, and London topography.  She is currently working on a monograph with a focus on epistolarity, courtiership and the Jacobean playhouse, which includes an edited collection of Overbury’s letters. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Court of the University of St Andrews. All rights reserved. The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland: No. SC013532.

Journal

Forum for Modern Language StudiesOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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