Notes on Contributors

Notes on Contributors Jane Aaron is Emeritus Professor at the University of South Wales. Her publications include A Double Singleness: Gender and the Writings of Charles and Mary Lamb (1991), Nineteenth-Century Women's Writing in Wales (2007) and Welsh Gothic (2013). Don Adams is Professor of English at Florida Atlantic University and has been a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Vietnam and India. Edward Allen is a Lecturer in English at the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Christ's College. His current research centres on poetics, music, and technology; his work on Eliot includes a chapter about the poet's ‘Radio Times’ in The Edinburgh Companion to T. S. Eliot and the Arts (2016). Jack Belloli is finishing a PhD at the University of Cambridge on skill in contemporary experimental theatre. His writing on theatre has also appeared in /Platform/ and /Women: A Cultural Review/. David Ellis’s affiliation, and a list of his publications, can be found on his website (@dellis-author.co.uk). His most recent book is Perfidious Albion: The Story of Stendhal and British Culture. Kirsty Martin is Senior Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Exeter. Her first book, Modernism and the Rhythms of Sympathy, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013. Helen Thaventhiran is a lecturer in literature at the University of Cambridge. Her book Radical Empiricists: Five Modernist Close Readers (OUP) was published in 2015. Ted Tregear is a PhD candidate at Trinity College, Cambridge, working on Shakespeare and Renaissance anthologies, with side interests in modern and early modern aesthetic theory. Geoffrey Wall is Professor of Modern European Literature at the University of York. He has published translations of most of Flaubert, a biography of Flaubert and a biography of Flaubert's father, Achille-Cléophas. He is currently writing a biography of George Sand. Flaubert's Crime Geoffrey Wall When Flaubert’s Madame Bovary was published in 1857 the author was prosecuted for ‘offences against public morality and religion’. Flaubert’s crime was that his protagonist was too real. Vulnerable and credulous women readers might be corrupted by her. Though Flaubert escaped legal retribution for his audacity, he was subjected to a private psychic ordeal. On the eve of completing the book, he had a dream in which he was attacked by a sinister female figure compounded from the details of maternal mortality in his recent family history. Flaubert had been trespassing on female territory. On awakening, he had lost his voice. Morality as a Matter of Taste: The Fiction of Ronald Firbank Don Adams This article considers the fiction of the neglected early twentieth-century British novelist Ronald Firbank from the point of view of its relationship to the ethical aesthetics of Oscar Wilde as exemplified in his famous dictum that truth is a matter of style. The article argues that the highly stylised characteristics of Firbank’s fiction that critical commentators have found most off-putting are the very characteristics that most fully and convincingly exemplify and express the subjective individualism that is the ideal of Wilde’s late-Romantic ethical aesthetics. D. H. Lawrence and Post-natal Depression Kirsty Martin This essay takes as its starting-point an intriguing claim made by Lawrence critics: that the character Juliet in Lawrence’s short story ‘Sun’ might be understood as suffering from post-natal depression. The essay explores the gap between what is suggested by the story, and what Lawrence could have known about, considering fraught accounts of childbirth in ‘Sun’ and Sons and Lovers (1913). It argues that something like post-natal depression in Lawrence’s work raises questions about the limits of the imagination, and focuses a nexus of concerns relating to illness, selfhood, and hope. Modernism and T. S. Eliot David Ellis In the second and third decades of the 20th century, T. S. Eliot put forward a number of ideas about poetry that became highly influential. Enthusiastically welcomed by the more avant-garde critics of the day, they were crucial in the establishment of what is now known as British literary ‘modernism’. The chief aim of this essay is to suggest that none of them really holds water and that, had Eliot not in fact been a great poet, they would never have been taken so seriously. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Cambridge Quarterly. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Cambridge Quarterly Oxford University Press

Notes on Contributors

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Cambridge Quarterly. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0008-199X
eISSN
1471-6836
D.O.I.
10.1093/camqtly/bfy003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jane Aaron is Emeritus Professor at the University of South Wales. Her publications include A Double Singleness: Gender and the Writings of Charles and Mary Lamb (1991), Nineteenth-Century Women's Writing in Wales (2007) and Welsh Gothic (2013). Don Adams is Professor of English at Florida Atlantic University and has been a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Vietnam and India. Edward Allen is a Lecturer in English at the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Christ's College. His current research centres on poetics, music, and technology; his work on Eliot includes a chapter about the poet's ‘Radio Times’ in The Edinburgh Companion to T. S. Eliot and the Arts (2016). Jack Belloli is finishing a PhD at the University of Cambridge on skill in contemporary experimental theatre. His writing on theatre has also appeared in /Platform/ and /Women: A Cultural Review/. David Ellis’s affiliation, and a list of his publications, can be found on his website (@dellis-author.co.uk). His most recent book is Perfidious Albion: The Story of Stendhal and British Culture. Kirsty Martin is Senior Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Exeter. Her first book, Modernism and the Rhythms of Sympathy, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013. Helen Thaventhiran is a lecturer in literature at the University of Cambridge. Her book Radical Empiricists: Five Modernist Close Readers (OUP) was published in 2015. Ted Tregear is a PhD candidate at Trinity College, Cambridge, working on Shakespeare and Renaissance anthologies, with side interests in modern and early modern aesthetic theory. Geoffrey Wall is Professor of Modern European Literature at the University of York. He has published translations of most of Flaubert, a biography of Flaubert and a biography of Flaubert's father, Achille-Cléophas. He is currently writing a biography of George Sand. Flaubert's Crime Geoffrey Wall When Flaubert’s Madame Bovary was published in 1857 the author was prosecuted for ‘offences against public morality and religion’. Flaubert’s crime was that his protagonist was too real. Vulnerable and credulous women readers might be corrupted by her. Though Flaubert escaped legal retribution for his audacity, he was subjected to a private psychic ordeal. On the eve of completing the book, he had a dream in which he was attacked by a sinister female figure compounded from the details of maternal mortality in his recent family history. Flaubert had been trespassing on female territory. On awakening, he had lost his voice. Morality as a Matter of Taste: The Fiction of Ronald Firbank Don Adams This article considers the fiction of the neglected early twentieth-century British novelist Ronald Firbank from the point of view of its relationship to the ethical aesthetics of Oscar Wilde as exemplified in his famous dictum that truth is a matter of style. The article argues that the highly stylised characteristics of Firbank’s fiction that critical commentators have found most off-putting are the very characteristics that most fully and convincingly exemplify and express the subjective individualism that is the ideal of Wilde’s late-Romantic ethical aesthetics. D. H. Lawrence and Post-natal Depression Kirsty Martin This essay takes as its starting-point an intriguing claim made by Lawrence critics: that the character Juliet in Lawrence’s short story ‘Sun’ might be understood as suffering from post-natal depression. The essay explores the gap between what is suggested by the story, and what Lawrence could have known about, considering fraught accounts of childbirth in ‘Sun’ and Sons and Lovers (1913). It argues that something like post-natal depression in Lawrence’s work raises questions about the limits of the imagination, and focuses a nexus of concerns relating to illness, selfhood, and hope. Modernism and T. S. Eliot David Ellis In the second and third decades of the 20th century, T. S. Eliot put forward a number of ideas about poetry that became highly influential. Enthusiastically welcomed by the more avant-garde critics of the day, they were crucial in the establishment of what is now known as British literary ‘modernism’. The chief aim of this essay is to suggest that none of them really holds water and that, had Eliot not in fact been a great poet, they would never have been taken so seriously. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Cambridge Quarterly. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

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The Cambridge QuarterlyOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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