Notes on Contributors

Notes on Contributors Robert Baker is the author of The Extravagant: Crossings of Modern Poetry and Modern Philosophy (2005) and In Dark Again in Wonder: The Poetry of René Char and George Oppen (2012), and the translator of René Char’s The Word as Archipelago (2012). He is Professor of English at the University of Montana. Julie Crane is Assistant Professor in English at the University of Durham. Previous publications have been on the differently lonely and convivial figures of Daniel Defoe, Samuel Johnson and Thomas Chatterton. Andre van Loon is a writer, literary critic and Director at We Are Social. He reviews books for The Daily Telegraph, The Spectator and others, and about writes about social media for Campaign, The Drum and Reaction. He is writing his first novel. Fran Middleton is currently a lecturer in Greek literature for the Faculty of Classics, Cambridge. She is interested in all aspects of ancient literature, specialising in imperial and late antique poetics. Robert Neild is an Emeritus Professor of Economics at Cambridge University and a Life Fellow of Trinity College. He worked in Whitehall as an economist in the Economic Section (which was first in the Cabinet Office and then moved to the Treasury) from 1951 to 1956 and knew many of the people he mentions here, but not the politico-military advice they were giving. Vidyan Ravinthiran is an editor at Prac Crit and the author of Grun-tu-molani (Bloodaxe, 2014), shortlisted for a few prizes, and also Elizabeth Bishop's Prosaic (Bucknell UP, 2015), winner of both the University English Prize and the Warren-Brooks Award for Outstanding Literary Criticism. Poems towards his next collection, The Million-Petalled Flower of Being Here (Bloodaxe, 2019) received a Northern Writers Award last year. Natasha Simonova is a Fellow and Lecturer in English at Exeter College, University of Oxford. She is the author of Early Modern Authorship and Prose Continuations: Adaptation and Ownership from Sidney to Richardson. Ross Wilson is Lecturer in Criticism in the Faculty of English, Cambridge and a Fellow of Trinity College. He is the author, among other things, of Shelley and the Apprehension of Life (2013). Steven Zwicker is Stanley Elkin Professor in the Humanities at Washington University, St Louis, where he teaches early modern literature. He writes on Dryden, Marvell, and most recently, Lord Rochester. Imagining a Literary Life: Dryden dwells among the Moderns and the Ancients Steven N. Zwicker In the Essay of Dramatic Poesy Dryden mimics and ventriloquises his contemporaries, asserting himself as spokesman for the new and brilliantly demonstrating his capacity to imagine a literary life among the moderns. Yet for all the deftness with which he handles those voices, it is through the ancients that Dryden most deeply engages with himself. Whatever the historical reality of the Virgil figured in Dryden's Dedication of the Aeneis, the imaginative reality that emerges most fully and movingly from their encounter is a poet using the ancients to discover and to fashion his own quite remarkable literary life. The Lonely Figures of  John Betjeman Julie Crane The poetry of John Betjeman is littered with lonely figures, and Betjeman, despite his famous television appearances, his convivial manner and his accessibility as a poet, is also the poet of dark imaginings, solitude and fear of death. Often labelled as a poet of light verse, Betjeman is better described, this essay suggests, as an adept manipulator of his own lightness. It was his unique achievement to make strenuous use of the workings of loneliness in his poetry, and to create lonely figures who are skilfully arranged to express it. Versions of Ascesis in Louise Glück’s Poetry Robert Baker Nearly all of Louise Glück’s readers have recognised an ascetic bearing in the formal spareness of her work. This essay traces three versions of ascesis expressed in her poetry: first, a practice of self-assertion through self-denial, involving a quest for independence, given forceful expression in Glück’s early books; second, an art of seeing through illusion, or an art of reduction, an art that shapes in particular Averno and A Village Life; and third, a path to reawakened openness, involving a letting go at the heart of holding on, a path resonantly voiced in Glück’s greatest book, The Wild Iris. The Origins and Cost of the UK's Special Relationship with the USA Robert Neild The notion that Britain might enjoy a lasting special relationship with the US after World War II was unrealistic from the start. Yet in its pursuit British governments have repeatedly sacrificed the UK's interests to those of the US. A series of post-war governments gave our strategic assets to the Americans. And, crucially, the Labour Government, pushed by the Americans, adopted a re-armament programme in 1950-51 so large that it did lasting damage to the economy. Remarkably, the minister responsible for that was the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Hugh Gaitskell. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Cambridge Quarterly. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Cambridge Quarterly Oxford University Press

Notes on Contributors

The Cambridge Quarterly , Volume Advance Article (2) – Jun 1, 2018

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Cambridge Quarterly. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0008-199X
eISSN
1471-6836
D.O.I.
10.1093/camqtly/bfy014
Publisher site
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Abstract

Robert Baker is the author of The Extravagant: Crossings of Modern Poetry and Modern Philosophy (2005) and In Dark Again in Wonder: The Poetry of René Char and George Oppen (2012), and the translator of René Char’s The Word as Archipelago (2012). He is Professor of English at the University of Montana. Julie Crane is Assistant Professor in English at the University of Durham. Previous publications have been on the differently lonely and convivial figures of Daniel Defoe, Samuel Johnson and Thomas Chatterton. Andre van Loon is a writer, literary critic and Director at We Are Social. He reviews books for The Daily Telegraph, The Spectator and others, and about writes about social media for Campaign, The Drum and Reaction. He is writing his first novel. Fran Middleton is currently a lecturer in Greek literature for the Faculty of Classics, Cambridge. She is interested in all aspects of ancient literature, specialising in imperial and late antique poetics. Robert Neild is an Emeritus Professor of Economics at Cambridge University and a Life Fellow of Trinity College. He worked in Whitehall as an economist in the Economic Section (which was first in the Cabinet Office and then moved to the Treasury) from 1951 to 1956 and knew many of the people he mentions here, but not the politico-military advice they were giving. Vidyan Ravinthiran is an editor at Prac Crit and the author of Grun-tu-molani (Bloodaxe, 2014), shortlisted for a few prizes, and also Elizabeth Bishop's Prosaic (Bucknell UP, 2015), winner of both the University English Prize and the Warren-Brooks Award for Outstanding Literary Criticism. Poems towards his next collection, The Million-Petalled Flower of Being Here (Bloodaxe, 2019) received a Northern Writers Award last year. Natasha Simonova is a Fellow and Lecturer in English at Exeter College, University of Oxford. She is the author of Early Modern Authorship and Prose Continuations: Adaptation and Ownership from Sidney to Richardson. Ross Wilson is Lecturer in Criticism in the Faculty of English, Cambridge and a Fellow of Trinity College. He is the author, among other things, of Shelley and the Apprehension of Life (2013). Steven Zwicker is Stanley Elkin Professor in the Humanities at Washington University, St Louis, where he teaches early modern literature. He writes on Dryden, Marvell, and most recently, Lord Rochester. Imagining a Literary Life: Dryden dwells among the Moderns and the Ancients Steven N. Zwicker In the Essay of Dramatic Poesy Dryden mimics and ventriloquises his contemporaries, asserting himself as spokesman for the new and brilliantly demonstrating his capacity to imagine a literary life among the moderns. Yet for all the deftness with which he handles those voices, it is through the ancients that Dryden most deeply engages with himself. Whatever the historical reality of the Virgil figured in Dryden's Dedication of the Aeneis, the imaginative reality that emerges most fully and movingly from their encounter is a poet using the ancients to discover and to fashion his own quite remarkable literary life. The Lonely Figures of  John Betjeman Julie Crane The poetry of John Betjeman is littered with lonely figures, and Betjeman, despite his famous television appearances, his convivial manner and his accessibility as a poet, is also the poet of dark imaginings, solitude and fear of death. Often labelled as a poet of light verse, Betjeman is better described, this essay suggests, as an adept manipulator of his own lightness. It was his unique achievement to make strenuous use of the workings of loneliness in his poetry, and to create lonely figures who are skilfully arranged to express it. Versions of Ascesis in Louise Glück’s Poetry Robert Baker Nearly all of Louise Glück’s readers have recognised an ascetic bearing in the formal spareness of her work. This essay traces three versions of ascesis expressed in her poetry: first, a practice of self-assertion through self-denial, involving a quest for independence, given forceful expression in Glück’s early books; second, an art of seeing through illusion, or an art of reduction, an art that shapes in particular Averno and A Village Life; and third, a path to reawakened openness, involving a letting go at the heart of holding on, a path resonantly voiced in Glück’s greatest book, The Wild Iris. The Origins and Cost of the UK's Special Relationship with the USA Robert Neild The notion that Britain might enjoy a lasting special relationship with the US after World War II was unrealistic from the start. Yet in its pursuit British governments have repeatedly sacrificed the UK's interests to those of the US. A series of post-war governments gave our strategic assets to the Americans. And, crucially, the Labour Government, pushed by the Americans, adopted a re-armament programme in 1950-51 so large that it did lasting damage to the economy. Remarkably, the minister responsible for that was the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Hugh Gaitskell. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Cambridge Quarterly. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

The Cambridge QuarterlyOxford University Press

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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