Notes on Contributors

Notes on Contributors Jocelyn Anderson completed her PhD at the Courtauld Institute of Art in 2013. Subsequently, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art (2014) and the post of Early Career Lecturer in Early Modern Art at the Courtauld Institute of Art (2015–16). Her work has appeared in Architectural History, The Burlington Magazine, and British Art Studies, and she is the author of Touring and Publicizing England’s Country Houses in the Long Eighteenth Century (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018). She is currently researching art and the British Empire and working on a book on British magazine illustration in the long eighteenth century. She is an independent scholar, currently teaching and writing in Toronto. Allison Deutsch is a Junior Research Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies, University College London. Her research addresses the multi-sensory reception of French modern-life painting and the gendering of sensory experience in the nineteenth century. She has published on culinary metaphors in nineteenth-century art criticism, and is currently at work on a monograph entitled Consuming Painting: Food and the Feminine in French Art and Criticism, 1865–1890. Amy Freund is a specialist in eighteenth-century French art. She is the Kleinheinz Endowment for the Arts and Education Endowed Chair of Art History and an associate professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. Her first book, Portraiture and Politics in Revolutionary France (Penn State University Press, 2014), examines the ways in which sitters and artists used portraiture to reformulate personal and political identity during the French Revolution. She is currently working on a second book on the representation of the hunt in late seventeenth- and eighteenth-century France. Johanna Gosse is a historian of modern and contemporary art and specializes in experimental film and media. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor and Scholar-in-Residence in the Department of Art & Art History at the University of Colorado, Boulder. From 2015-2017, she was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Art History & Archaeology at Columbia University. Gosse is currently completing her first book, Atomic Sublime: The Experimental Films of Bruce Conner. Her second book project, Imitation of Life: Ray Johnson’s Network Aesthetics, received a Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant in 2015. Aline Guillermet is a Junior Research Fellow at King’s College, University of Cambridge. Her interests include post-war German art, the impact of technology on contemporary painting, and digital art. She has recently published ‘“Painting like nature”: Chance and the Landscape in Gerhard Richter’s Overpainted Photographs’, Art History, vol. 40 no. 1 (February 2017). Amy K. Hamlin is Associate Professor of Art History at St. Catherine University. She holds an MA in art history from the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art and a PhD in art history from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. Her research uses reception theory and critical historiography to question received ideas about art and art history. She is currently working on a project that explores the discourses of mourning and eschatology in modern and contemporary art. She has presented and published on the art of Paul Cézanne, Max Beckmann, William H. Johnson, Jasper Johns, and Kara Walker. Together with Karen J. Leader, Hamlin is co-founder of Art History That (also known as AHT), a multi-platform project that aims to curate, crowdsource, and collaborate on the future of art history. James D. Herbert is Professor of Art History and co-founder of the PhD Program in Visual Studies at the University of California, Irvine. He writes on European art and music from the sixteenth century to the present, with a special focus on French painting of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He is the author of four books, Fauve Painting: The Making of Cultural Politics (1992), Paris 1937: Worlds on Exhibition (1998), Our Distance from God: Studies of the Divine and the Mundane in Western Art and Music (2008), and Brushstroke and Emergence: Courbet, Impressionism, Picasso (2015). Jennifer Sichel is a PhD candidate in art history at The University of Chicago, where she is completing a dissertation titled ‘Criticism without Authority: Gene Swenson, Jill Johnston, Gregory Battcock’. Her research investigates how art criticism became a vital site for new, queer experiments with language, activism, and intermedia practice in the sixties. Her work has been supported by fellowships from the Smithsonian Archives of American Art and the Terra Foundation for American Art. She holds a BA in art history and philosophy from Boston University and an MA in art history from Williams College. Joris van Gastel is scientific assistant at the Bibliotheca Hertziana – Max Planck Institute for Art History in Rome. Having studied Psychology and Art History at the VU University Amsterdam and the Università Ca' Foscari, Venice, he wrote his PhD thesis as part of the interdisciplinary research project ‘Art, Agency and Living Presence in Early Modern Italy’ based at Leiden University. His PhD thesis was published in 2013 with the title ‘Il marmo spirante: Sculpture and Experience in Seventeenth-Century Rome’. In addition to shorter fellowships in Florence, Rome, Ferrara and Berlin he was research fellow at the Kolleg-Forschergruppe ‘Bildakt und Verkörperung’ (Humboldt University, Berlin, 2011–2012), at the University of Warwick (2013) and was part of the research group ‘Images of Nature’, based at Hamburg University (2014–2016). Currently, he works on a project on artistic materials and techniques in baroque Naples. Richard Wrigley teaches in the Department of History of Art at the University of Nottingham and is writing a book on the history of the flâneur. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oxford Art Journal Oxford University Press

Notes on Contributors

Oxford Art Journal , Volume 41 (1) – Mar 1, 2018

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved
ISSN
0142-6540
eISSN
1741-7287
D.O.I.
10.1093/oxartj/kcy003
Publisher site
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Abstract

Jocelyn Anderson completed her PhD at the Courtauld Institute of Art in 2013. Subsequently, she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art (2014) and the post of Early Career Lecturer in Early Modern Art at the Courtauld Institute of Art (2015–16). Her work has appeared in Architectural History, The Burlington Magazine, and British Art Studies, and she is the author of Touring and Publicizing England’s Country Houses in the Long Eighteenth Century (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018). She is currently researching art and the British Empire and working on a book on British magazine illustration in the long eighteenth century. She is an independent scholar, currently teaching and writing in Toronto. Allison Deutsch is a Junior Research Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies, University College London. Her research addresses the multi-sensory reception of French modern-life painting and the gendering of sensory experience in the nineteenth century. She has published on culinary metaphors in nineteenth-century art criticism, and is currently at work on a monograph entitled Consuming Painting: Food and the Feminine in French Art and Criticism, 1865–1890. Amy Freund is a specialist in eighteenth-century French art. She is the Kleinheinz Endowment for the Arts and Education Endowed Chair of Art History and an associate professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. Her first book, Portraiture and Politics in Revolutionary France (Penn State University Press, 2014), examines the ways in which sitters and artists used portraiture to reformulate personal and political identity during the French Revolution. She is currently working on a second book on the representation of the hunt in late seventeenth- and eighteenth-century France. Johanna Gosse is a historian of modern and contemporary art and specializes in experimental film and media. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor and Scholar-in-Residence in the Department of Art & Art History at the University of Colorado, Boulder. From 2015-2017, she was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Art History & Archaeology at Columbia University. Gosse is currently completing her first book, Atomic Sublime: The Experimental Films of Bruce Conner. Her second book project, Imitation of Life: Ray Johnson’s Network Aesthetics, received a Creative Capital/Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant in 2015. Aline Guillermet is a Junior Research Fellow at King’s College, University of Cambridge. Her interests include post-war German art, the impact of technology on contemporary painting, and digital art. She has recently published ‘“Painting like nature”: Chance and the Landscape in Gerhard Richter’s Overpainted Photographs’, Art History, vol. 40 no. 1 (February 2017). Amy K. Hamlin is Associate Professor of Art History at St. Catherine University. She holds an MA in art history from the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art and a PhD in art history from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. Her research uses reception theory and critical historiography to question received ideas about art and art history. She is currently working on a project that explores the discourses of mourning and eschatology in modern and contemporary art. She has presented and published on the art of Paul Cézanne, Max Beckmann, William H. Johnson, Jasper Johns, and Kara Walker. Together with Karen J. Leader, Hamlin is co-founder of Art History That (also known as AHT), a multi-platform project that aims to curate, crowdsource, and collaborate on the future of art history. James D. Herbert is Professor of Art History and co-founder of the PhD Program in Visual Studies at the University of California, Irvine. He writes on European art and music from the sixteenth century to the present, with a special focus on French painting of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He is the author of four books, Fauve Painting: The Making of Cultural Politics (1992), Paris 1937: Worlds on Exhibition (1998), Our Distance from God: Studies of the Divine and the Mundane in Western Art and Music (2008), and Brushstroke and Emergence: Courbet, Impressionism, Picasso (2015). Jennifer Sichel is a PhD candidate in art history at The University of Chicago, where she is completing a dissertation titled ‘Criticism without Authority: Gene Swenson, Jill Johnston, Gregory Battcock’. Her research investigates how art criticism became a vital site for new, queer experiments with language, activism, and intermedia practice in the sixties. Her work has been supported by fellowships from the Smithsonian Archives of American Art and the Terra Foundation for American Art. She holds a BA in art history and philosophy from Boston University and an MA in art history from Williams College. Joris van Gastel is scientific assistant at the Bibliotheca Hertziana – Max Planck Institute for Art History in Rome. Having studied Psychology and Art History at the VU University Amsterdam and the Università Ca' Foscari, Venice, he wrote his PhD thesis as part of the interdisciplinary research project ‘Art, Agency and Living Presence in Early Modern Italy’ based at Leiden University. His PhD thesis was published in 2013 with the title ‘Il marmo spirante: Sculpture and Experience in Seventeenth-Century Rome’. In addition to shorter fellowships in Florence, Rome, Ferrara and Berlin he was research fellow at the Kolleg-Forschergruppe ‘Bildakt und Verkörperung’ (Humboldt University, Berlin, 2011–2012), at the University of Warwick (2013) and was part of the research group ‘Images of Nature’, based at Hamburg University (2014–2016). Currently, he works on a project on artistic materials and techniques in baroque Naples. Richard Wrigley teaches in the Department of History of Art at the University of Nottingham and is writing a book on the history of the flâneur. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Oxford Art JournalOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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