New Scholarship

New Scholarship THE FOREST HISTORY SOCIETY (FHS) maintains an extensive database of published sources related to environmental history. The “new scholarship” section of this journal includes just a selection of the new information that the FHS library adds each quarter. The library indexes all entries in the database by topic, chronological period, and geographic area. The library staff will gladly provide additional information about items you see in this section or information on other topics from the database. They are happy to respond to requests for full bibliographies or lists of archival collections for specific research projects. The unabridged version of this New Scholarship section is searchable as part of the research databases on our website at www.foresthistory.org. The compiler also welcomes information about relevant publications that the staff may have missed, including books, theses, and dissertations. The compiler particularly welcomes copies of relevant articles. Contact us by mail at New Scholarship, Forest History Society, 701 William Vickers Ave., Durham, NC 27701, USA, by telephone at 919-682-9319, or by email: library@foresthistory.org BOOKS Bacci, Massimo Livi. Our Shrinking Planet. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2017. ix + 149 pp. Figures, tables, notes, index. Provides a broad history of the global population within the context of environmental constraints and the balance of power between nations. Looks at human history from the Stone Age to the twenty-first century, documenting the decreases in available space for every person on the planet Earth and the growing limits to the world’s capacity. Translated into English by David Broder. Bailey, Janette-Susan. Dust Bowl: Depression America to World War Two Australia. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. xxii + 353 pp. Illustrations, bibliography, index. Examines the Dust Bowl as a transnational phenomenon, specifically looking at mythologies surrounding the Dust Bowl in both the United States and Australia during the World War II era. Provides a cultural history of how Dust Bowl imagery was created and interpreted in both nations during this time period. Belonsky, Andrew. The Log Cabin: An Illustrated History. New York: Countryman Press, 2018. 315 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. An illustrated history of the log cabin, detailing how the log cabin uniquely shaped the history and culture of the United States. Details the origins of the log cabin, popular representations of the cabin in culture, and how the cabin played an underrated role in the shaping of America’s culture from the seventeenth through twentieth centuries. Benson, Melinda Harm, and Robin Kundis Craig. The End of Sustainability: Resilience and the Future of Environmental Governance in the Anthropocene. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2017. xiii + 241 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. The authors propose resilience as a more realistic and workable approach to environmental governance in the United States. Includes discussion of a need to shift away from historic American environmental and natural resource laws toward new narratives representing the role of humans within complex ecosystems. Bradley, Ben. British Columbia by the Road: Car Culture and the Making of a Modern Landscape. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2017. xii + 309 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. Provides a cultural and environmental history of the roads and highways through the interior of British Columbia. Looks at how cars and roads provided users with a curated view of the natural landscape. Details how tourism boosters, government officials, and conservationists used road networks to manipulate perceptions of the British Columbia environment. Brooks, Shelley Alden. Big Sur: The Making of a Prized California Landscape. Oakland: University of California Press, 2017. xv + 261 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. A cultural and environmental history of Big Sur, a prized landscape along the central California coast. Looks at the artists and writers who helped popularize and define the Big Sur area as a cultural symbol of California. Also details the public and private partnerships that helped preserve the landscape and provide a model for future coastal preservation throughout California. Carhart, Arthur H., et al. The Last Stand of the Pack: Critical Edition. Boulder: University Press of Colorado. xiii + 290 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Examines the past, present, and future of wolves in Colorado. Originally published in 1929, this work provided a historical account of the extermination of what were believed to be the last wolves in the state. This updated and expanded edition offers a collection of works supplementing the original text that explore the last century of wolf activity and the role of wolves in the Colorado ecosystem. Chaney, Anthony. Runaway: Gregory Bateson, the Double Bind, and the Rise of Ecological Consciousness. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2017. 304 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Examines the work of Gregory Bateson (1904–80), an anthropologist who introduced the double-bind theory of schizophrenia, studied dolphin communication, and was among the first to warn of a greenhouse effect and its impacts on climate change. Focuses on the impacts of his work on raising global ecological consciousness beginning in the 1960s. Dagenais, Michele. Montreal, City of Water: An Environmental History. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2017. xx + 231 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. A history of the water surrounding the city of Montreal, examining the water as both a physical element as well as a sociocultural component of life in the city. Details how water transformed the urban form of Montreal over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Also explores issues related to pollution, water supply, waterfront redevelopment, water access, and more. Translated from French by Peter Feldstein. Danner, Lauren. Crown Jewel Wilderness: Creating North Cascades National Park. Pullman: Washington State University Press, 2017. 320 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Details the history of the North Cascades National Park in Washington. Documents work to establish a national park in the area beginning in the late nineteenth century, the growth of interest in wilderness preservation through the twentieth century, the growth of tourism, renewed efforts to conserve natural landscapes, and the park’s formal creation in 1968. Emmett, Robert S., and David E. Nye. The Environmental Humanities: A Critical Introduction. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2017. viii + 236 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Provides a concise overview of the environmental humanities as an academic discipline. Presents an overview of the field, as well as concepts, issues, current research, examples, case studies, and more. Explores how the humanities can improve understanding of environmental problems and issues. Hoover, Elizabeth. The River in Us: Fighting Toxics in a Mohawk Community. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017. xviii + 372 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. An in-depth study of Akwesasne, a Mohawk community in upstate New York, looking at the community’s fight for environmental justice over the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Details the effort taken by the local population to combat the environmental contamination from nearby Superfund sites, and the work done to reclaim the community’s landscape, health, and culture. Johnson, Nick. Grass Roots: A History of Cannabis in the American West. Corvallis: Oregon State University Press, 2017. xiv + 234 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. A history of marijuana growing in the western United States from the early twentieth through the early twenty-first century. Looks at developments in growing technology, the impacts of Prohibition, environmental aspects of cannabis growing, and more. Overall provides a detailed history of the cannabis plant from an agricultural and environmental point of view. Kiernan, Denise. The Last Castle: The Epic Story of Love, Loss, and American Royalty in the Nation’s Largest Home. New York: Touchstone, 2017. 388 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. Details the stories behind the lives of Edith and George Vanderbilt, and the building and management of the Biltmore estate near Asheville, North Carolina. Includes discussion of Gifford Pinchot, Carl Schenck, the Biltmore Forest School, forest management at the estate, and the creation of Pisgah National Forest. Lee, Debbie, and Kathryn Newfont, eds. The Land Speaks: New Voices at the Intersection of Oral and Environmental History. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. xiii + 305 pp. Illustrations, index. A collection of works examining the intersection of the field of oral history and environmental studies. Looks at how the use of oral histories can bring a greater understanding of issues related to public land and the environment. Topics include African American smoke jumpers, the work of women to conserve the Indiana Dunes, the impacts of flooding in the Savannah River Valley, urban gardens in Philadelphia, and much more. Leeming, Mark R. In Defence of Home Places: Environmental Activism in Nova Scotia. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2017. xxvii + 208 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. A history of the growth and evolution of environmental activism in Nova Scotia over the late twentieth century. Details the successes of the environmental movement, disagreements and divisions within the movement, and gradual weakening of the collective activism. Also places the environmental activism seen in Nova Scotia within broader national and international contexts. Mancall, Peter C. Nature and Culture in the Early Modern Atlantic. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017. xiv + 197 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. Explores how Europeans and Native Americans thought about the natural world during the century following the ocean voyages of Christopher Columbus. Looks at shifts in thinking during this period about the Atlantic ecological world as views adapted from the medieval to the modern period. Draws from written and oral records, as well as art, to document real and imaginary plants and animals of the sixteenth-century Atlantic world. Marran, Christine L. Ecology without Culture: Aesthetics for a Toxic World. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017. 182 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. Author looks at how biological elements from the material world have proven to be such an effective medium for representing culture, from cherry blossoms in Japan to amber waves of grain in the United States. Also examines representations of toxic events in literature, poetry, and film. Pearson, Thomas W. When the Hills Are Gone: Frac Sands Mining and the Struggle for Community. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017. 248 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. A history of sand mining in Wisconsin during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Details the growth of sand mining relative to the fracking industry, the mobilization of local groups opposed to sand mining, and the environmental impacts seen throughout the state during this time period. Perkins, John H. Changing Energy: The Transition to a Sustainable Future. Oakland: University of California Press, 2017. xix + 343 pp. Illustrations, figures, tables, notes, index. Explores the past and future of human transitions through various energy economies around the world. Looks at the use of coal, oil, gas, and uranium as energy sources, and the ongoing transition to renewable resources. Also discusses the impacts of the energy economy on the environment, politics, and climate change. Ranzoni, Patricia. Still Mill: Poems, Stories and Songs of Making Paper in Bucksport, Maine, 1930–2014. Unity: North Country Press, 2017. Documents the life and death of a paper mill, its workers, and its culture in Bucksport, Maine, between 1930 and 2014. Provides a collection of songs and stories documenting the culture of those who lived in a paper mill community during this time period. Sayen, Jamie. You Had a Job for Life: Story of a Company Town. Hanover: University Press of New England, 2018. 283 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. A detailed historical portrait of a company town, Groveton, New Hampshire, a community built around the fortunes of a pulp and paper mill for much of the twentieth century. Documents the changes in ownership, the impacts of global business trends, and the eventual closure of the mill in 2007. Also provides a worker-level view of life within the pulp and paper industry throughout the twentieth century and its importance to the local economy. Tsing, Anna Lowenhaupt, et al., eds. Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017. 348 pp. Illustrations, figures. A collection of essays by scholars from various disciplines looking at landscapes haunted by the violence of modernity or interspecies and intraspecies sociality. Discusses human-induced environmental changes threatening multispecies livability. Weckerly, Butch. Population Ecology of Roosevelt Elk: Conservation and Management in Redwood National and State Parks. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2017. xvii + 190 pp. Illustrations, maps, figures, bibliography, index. Author draws on a study spanning over twenty years to provide detailed observations of the Roosevelt elk populations in the parks along California’s north coast. Documents the dynamics of the elk populations and provides information on the ecology of big game animals and wildlife in the Redwood State and National Parks. White, Dan. Under the Stars: How America Fell in Love with Camping. New York: Henry Holt, 2016. 401 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. Combines personal narrative about camping in the wild with a history of the evolution of outdoor recreation in the United States. Details how the American wilderness evolved from a forbidden place to a source of relaxation and adventure. Highlights the individuals who have impacted American views toward camping and the great outdoors. White, Sam. The Little Ice Age and Europe’s Encounter with North America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2017. xii + 361 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. Looks at the impact of the Little Ice Age on the encounters of early Europeans with the landscape of North America during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Combining research in history, climatology, and archaeology, this work examines how the severity of the winter climate directly threatened early European settlements. Wilk, Christopher. Plywood: A Material Story. New York: Thames & Hudson, 2017. 240 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Provides an illustrated history of plywood in England and the United States. Details the creation process and the many uses for plywood from the eighteenth through the twenty-first centuries. Includes discussion of debates over veneer plywood, the use of plywood in airplanes and automobiles, plywood in architecture, and much more. Woods, Rebecca J. H. The Herds Shot Round the World: Native Breeds and the British Empire, 1800–1900. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2017. xiii + 233 pp. Illustrations, figures, notes, bibliography, index. Details the impact of British imperialism and colonial expansion on the breeding and production of sheep and cattle livestock during the nineteenth century. Explores the creation of so-called native British breeds of sheep and cattle, failed attempts to naturalize Spanish merino sheep in England, the exporting of Hereford cattle, and the development of colonial hybrid breeds throughout the British Empire. ARTICLES Baker, Andrew C. “Metropolitan Growth Along the Nation’s River: Power, Waste, and Environmental Politics in a Northern Virginia County, 1943–1971.” Journal of Urban History 43 (September 2017): 703–19. Looks at the impacts of population growth and urban development in the area outside Washington. D.C., during the postwar period. Details the history of the agricultural area of Loudoun County, Virginia, from the 1940s to the 1970s as it faced six proposed urban infrastructure projects. Discusses the responses and interaction between the federal government, urban interest groups, local governments, and grassroots environmentalists. De Graef, Pieter. “The Peasant Route to Innovation: Fertilizer Improvement in the Smallholding Economy of Eighteenth-Century Flanders, Belgium.” Agricultural History 91 (Fall 2017): 488–512. Analyzes the introduction of new agricultural knowledge in peasant regions and the ways in which smallholding families gained confidence to adopt new approaches to their farming activities. Details the impacts of two innovative fertilizer improvements, animal urine and lime, in the eighteenth-century smallholding economy of Inland Flanders. Dethier, Jean-Jacques. “Trash, Cities, and Politics: Urban Environmental Problems in Indonesia.” Indonesia 103 (April 2017): 73–90. Describes the history and effectiveness of an environmental program begun in Indonesia during the 1980s to focus on waste management, cleanliness and sanitation, and green spaces. Discusses the program within the larger context of Indonesia’s ongoing urbanization and its negative environmental consequences. Dobkins, Rebecca, et al. “Tribes of the Oregon Country: Cultural Plant Harvests and Indigenous Relationships with Ancestral Lands in the Twenty-First Century.” Oregon Historical Quarterly 118 (Winter 2017): 488–517. Provides research into the harvesting of plants by tribal people in Oregon on ancestral lands now held by the US Forest Service. Looks at the historic uses of forest and rangeland resources by Native Americans, legal issues over land access, and the ongoing cultural importance of plants such as bear grass (Xerophyllum tenax). Firtova, Magdalena. “Oil Sands in European Media: Representations of the Canadian Oil Sands in European Newspapers, 2008–2013.” Journal of Canadian Studies 51 (Winter 2017): 186–216. Analyzes how leading European newspapers reported on oil-sands production in Canada during the early twenty-first century. Suggests that European coverage adopted a critical perspective based on the environmental impacts of oil-sands development, although results did vary in specifics by country. Hauser, Jason. “‘A Golden Harvest’: Gold Mining and Agricultural Reform in North Carolina, 1799–1842.” Agricultural History 91 (Fall 2017): 469–87. Details the ensuing debates following the 1799 discovery of gold in the North Carolina piedmont region. Examines the conflicts over issues related to gold extraction such as proper land management, the relationship between industry and agriculture, early national agricultural reform, and economic boosterism. Hemo, Eran, and Ravit Linn. “Sustainable Conservation of Archaeological Sites with Local Communities: The Case Study of Tel Yoqne’am, Israel.” Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology & Heritage Studies 5, no. 3–4 (2017): 411–26. Discusses the lack of conservation strategies surrounding archaeological sites and the resulting neglect and deterioration. Documents the involvement of a local community in conserving an archaeological site at Tel Yoqne’am, Israel, showing the clear advantage of collaborating with local communities in the sustainable conservation of sites. Holleland, Herdis. “Caged for Protection: Exploring the Paradoxes of Protecting New Zealand’s Dactylanthus Taylorii.” Environment and History 23 (November 2017): 545–67. Studies the history and impact of conservation efforts to save Dactylanthus taylorii, a native New Zealand plant. Discusses debates over conservation of native and nonnative species, as well as the cultural importance of saving native plants and animals from extinction. Loadenthal, Michael. “‘Eco-Terrorism’: An Incident-Driven History of Attack (1973–2010).” Journal for the Study of Radicalism 11 (Fall 2017): 1–34. Documents the history of radical activist groups such as the Earth Liberation Front, the Band of Mercy, and the Animal Liberation Front between 1973 and 2010. Looks at how the animal and earth liberation movements interacted historically and ideologically within a realm of politicized violence and militant social protest throughout the world. McCaskie, Tom C. “‘The Art or Mystery of Physick’—Asante Medicinal Plants and the Western Ordering of Botanical Knowledge.” History in Africa: A Journal of Method 44 (June 2017): 27–62. Examines the medicinal plants collected in the West African forest kingdom of Asante in 1817 by Henry Tedlie, a member of the well-known English mission led by Thomas Bowdich. Discusses the influence of Europeans on the eventual classification of these plants in a Western authorized botanical taxonomy that is now used worldwide. McFarlane, Wallace Scot. “Oil on the Farm: The East Texas Oil Boom and the Origins of an Energy Economy.” The Journal of Southern History 83 (November 2017): 853–88. Provides an environmental history of the East Texas oil boom during the 1930s. Details the relationships between the petroleum revolution during this time period and agriculture, land ownership, labor, the political economy, and the local environment. Moscato, Derek. “Fukushima Fallout in Japanese Manga.” Journal of Communication Inquiry 41 (October 2017): 382–402. Details fictionalized accounts in Japanese manga of the environmental and health hazards for residents living near the Fukushima nuclear plant. Explores the ethical implications of such portrayals in a fictionalized medium against the unique backdrop of Japan’s evolving media landscape and tumultuous recent environmental history. Nixon, Sean J. “Vanishing Peregrines: J. A. Baker, Environmental Crisis and Bird-Centred Cultures of Nature, 1954–73.” Rural History 28 (October 2017): 205–26. Uses J. A. Baker’s book The Peregrine (1967) to place Baker’s writing within a broader field of postwar observation and publication that worked to shape new ways of understanding and taking pleasure from the natural environment. Details the recording practices and publications of English naturalist and bird-watching societies that flourished in these years. Obraczka, Marcelo, et al. “Analysis of Coastal Environmental Management Practices in Subregions of California and Brazil.” Journal of Coastal Research 33 (November 2017): 1315–32. Presents a case study of coastal and environmental management systems in the urbanized area of the central coast of California and the developing coastal lowlands of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, over the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Argues that transparency and accessibility to the decision-making process are essential to the success of coastal environmental management in both areas. Pumphrey, Clint, and Jim Kichas. “From Tire Tracks to Treasure Trail: Cooperative Boosterism along U.S. Highway 89.” Utah Historical Quarterly 85 (Summer 2017): 257–72. Looks at the history of boosterism and tourism promotion surrounding Highway 89 to bring new people to Utah and the American West during the early twentieth century. Details efforts to promote the scenic wonders and undeveloped agricultural and mineral resources along the route as a way to attract both tourists and home seekers to the area. Ruuskanen, Esa, and Kari Väyrynen. “Theory and Prospects of Environmental History.” Rethinking History 21 (December 2017): 456–73. Analyzes the theoretical and philosophical starting points of the study of environmental history. Looks at the long-term evolution of ecologically aware historical writing from the early nineteenth century onward and the emergence of the academic field of environmental history in the United States and Europe over the second half of the twentieth century. Satpathy, Bijayashree. “Forest Rights Act Implementation in Odisha.” South Asia Research 37 (November 2017): 259–76. Examines issues surrounding India’s Forest Rights Act and the rights over access to forest resources by local forest dwellers. Includes discussion of the history of forest-dependent communities and forest conservation, with a focus on two villages of the Mayurbhanj district in Odisha. Simmons, David A. “Silent Channels: Building Standard Oil’s Pipeline Empire.” Timeline 34 (October–December 2017): 44–53. Details the efforts surrounding the early construction of natural gas pipelines through Ohio during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Looks at the work done by Standard Oil to maximize use of natural gas and to build pipelines, and the environmental impacts of extraction. Skopyk, Bradley. “Rivers of God, Rivers of Empire: Climate Extremes, Environmental Transformation and Agroecology in Colonial Mexico.” Environment and History 23 (November 2017): 491–522. A study of the ecological impacts of the Little Ice Age on colonial Mexico from 1300 to 1850. Details the increase in major flood events during this time period and their long-term effects on colonial agricultural systems. Stevenson, C. Ian. “Introducing Environmental History into Vernacular Architecture: Considerations from New England’s Historic Dams.” Buildings & Landscapes 24 (Fall 2017): 1–21. Explores the relationships between environmental history and the vernacular architecture of historic dams in the New England region. Looks at the removal and demolition of various dams in the region for public health and environmental reasons over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topham, Dale. “Staking Claims on the Markagunt Plateau: Creation of Cedar Breaks National Monument, 1916–1934.” Utah Historical Quarterly 85 (Summer 2017): 238–56. A history of the creation of Cedar Breaks National Monument in Utah focusing on efforts made between 1916 and 1934. Documents disagreements between local residents, tourism promoters, state conservation agencies, the US Forest Service, and the National Park Service. Reveals prevailing debates over public lands management during this period. Vansant, Jacqueline. “Austrian and Dustbowl Refugees Unite in ‘Three Faces West’ (1940).” Journal of Austrian-American History 1, no. 1 (2017): 98–116. Looks at the 1940 film Three Faces West and its depiction of environmental and social issues through its story of an Austrian-American romance. The film uses the dire situation of farmers in a drought-ravaged area to elicit sympathy for the refugees from Europe and to challenge nativist and isolationist attitudes. Vaughan, David K. “The Au Sable River Lumberman’s Monument: William B. Mershon’s Struggle to Create a Meaningful Memorial of the Michigan Lumbering Era.” Michigan Historical Review 43 (Fall 2017): 1–36. Provides a detailed history of the Lumberman’s Monument, a bronze statue dedicated to the lumber industry, located on Au Sable River west of Oscoda, Michigan. Intended to serve as a monument to Michigan’s pioneer lumbermen of the nineteenth century, the statue was erected in 1932 at a time of growing concern over the need for a more balanced approach to forest management and conservation. Vo Phun, Juily lyn. “Health Brokers: Chinese Herbal Doctors, Medical Tourism, and Medical Advertisements in Southern California, 1900–1941.” Amerasia Journal 43, no. 2 (2017): 47–78. Provides a history of Chinese herbal medicine physicians in Southern California between 1900 and 1941. Discusses the marketing of herbal medicines, the influence of Chinese herbal remedies on the greater medical profession, and the history of public health in California. Wegner, Janice. “A Weed by Any Other Name: Problems with Defining Weeds in Tropical Queensland.” Environment and History 23 (November 2017): 523–44. An exploration of the history of issues related to environmental labeling, in this case looking at plants characterized as weeds. Examines the moral judgments behind the labeling of plants as weeds or invasive or harmful in the Australian state of Queens, and how the threat of such plants can change over time. Weimer, Daniel. “The Politics of Contamination: Herbicides, Drug Control, and Environmental Law.” Diplomatic History 41 (November 2017): 847–73. Examines the politics of contamination concerning herbicides and the use of drug control policy as a venue to enact a stronger role for environmental law in US foreign policy during the late twentieth century. Focuses on the controversy surrounding the use of paraquat-laced marijuana in the drug crop defoliation program in Mexico during the 1970s. Details the politics of toxic chemicals and public health, especially in regard to international policy. Withers, Jeremy. “Bicycles Across the Galaxy: Attacking Automobility in 1950s Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies 44 (November 2017): 417–36. Studies several works of science fiction from the 1950s that function as counternarratives to the hegemony of the automobile during this decade. Details how various novels and short stories chose to portray bicycles as useful transportation for adults, images that counter the prevailing ideology of the car that was crystallizing with such durability in postwar America. Zelko, Frank. “Scaling Greenpeace: From Local Activism to Global Governance.” Historical Social Research 42, no. 2 (2017): 318–42. Documents the evolution and growth of Greenpeace from the 1970s through the 1990s. Details how the organization, founded as an antinuclear protest group in Vancouver in the early 1970s, grew into the world’s largest environmental nongovernmental organization. Zou, Yi, et al. “The Decline of Pingcheng: Climate Change Impact, Vulnerability and Adaptation in the Northern Wei Dynasty, China.” Journal of Historical Geography 58 (October 2017): 12–22. Explores the environmental factors behind the Northern Wei dynasty unexpectedly moving its capital from Pingcheng to Luoyang in 494 ce. Looks at the possible impacts of climate change, droughts, population growth, and other natural disasters. DISSERTATIONS AND THESES Bender, John Elijahn. “Wind, Forest, Fire, and Mountain: The Evolution of Environmental Management and Local Society in Central Japan, 1450–1650.” PhD dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2017. 239 pp. Examines how people dealt with environmental challenges and disputes during Japan’s late medieval period (ca. 1450–1600), an age of instability, institutional failure, and war. The implementation of environmental management during this time period proved crucial in ending a long period of warfare and formed the basis of an even longer era of stability. Biswas, Sravani. “The Political Tempest ‘Natural’ Disasters and Politics in India and Bangladesh, 1876 & 1970.” PhD dissertation, Syracuse University, 2017. 226 pp. Uses case studies of the Great Backurgunge Cyclone of 1876 and the Bhola Cyclone of 1970 to explore relationships between the state and other parties surrounding natural disaster events in India and Bangladesh. Argues that while hazards like cyclones are natural in origin, their effects depend on the socioeconomic and political positioning of the human actors, and they can also act as catalysts for change. Halvorson, George Charles. “Valuing the Air: The Politics of Environmental Governance from the Clean Air Act to Carbon Trading.” PhD dissertation, Columbia University, 2017. 408 pp. Documents the history of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) embracing the new field of environmental economics, funding pioneering research that concluded the benefits of environmental protection outweighed the costs. This ran contrary to environmentalist notions of priceless nature, causing environmental advocates to fight to prevent the EPA from fully adopting a cost-benefit approach to policymaking. Hill, Jonathan. “Crossing the Atlantic: Carl Schenck and the Formation of American Forestry.” Honor’s thesis, Duke University, 2017. 92 pp. Explores the work of German forester Carl Alwin Schenck (1868–1955) in the United States at the beginning of the twentieth century, detailing his contributions to the formation of American forestry. Reestablishes Schenck’s presence in the historical timeline of the early conservation movement and argues for the important influence Schenck had on the foundations of forestry in the United States. Munger, Michael Sean. “Ten Years of Winter: The Cold Decade and Environmental Consciousness in the Early 19th Century.” PhD dissertation, University of Oregon, 2017. 355 pp. Details the history of two volcanic eruptions in 1809 and 1815 that shrouded the earth in sulfur dioxide and triggered a series of weather and climate anomalies. This resulted in a “Cold Decade,” a period defined by scientists from 1810 to 1819. This study examines the development of a Cold Decade environmental consciousness found in people in both the United States and Europe. Novikau, Aliaksandr. “Environmental Discourses in Belarus: Issues and Ideologies.” PhD dissertation, Northern Arizona University, 2017. 229 pp. Studies the changes in environmental discourses in the Republic of Belarus from 1985 to 2014 and the factors that caused these changes. Reveals the environmental issues and environmental ideologies that were prioritized in Belarus during this period. Olsen, Susan Annette. “Environmental Relocation Policy as Experienced by One Eastern Missouri Dioxin-Contaminated Community.” PhD dissertation, Walden University, 2017. 334 pp. Provides insight into the long-term social impacts of the Environmental Protection Agency’s environmental relocation policy. Uses data collected from the environmental relocation of one dioxin-contaminated community in eastern Missouri, documenting individuals who lived in the community during the 1970s and 1980s. Stanford-McIntyre, Sarah S. “Refining the Desert: The Politics of Wealth, Industrialization, and Environmental Risk in the Twentieth-Century Texas Oil Industry.” PhD dissertation, The College of William and Mary, 2017. 367 pp. Uses labor, environmental, and technological history to describe seventy years of West Texas oil expansion and decline juxtaposed against a growing environmental and public health crisis. Argues that a workplace culture of individualistic risk taking coupled with industry propaganda that bred a utopian faith in technology was reinforced by the region’s punishing geography, general isolation, and the limits of industrial infrastructure. Vitous, Crystal Ann. “Impacts of Tourism Development on Livelihoods in Placencia Village, Belize.” Master’s thesis, University of South Florida, 2017. 115 pp. Examines the political-ecologic dimensions of rapid tourism expansion in southern Belize over the early twenty-first century by investigating how the health of the environment is perceived, what processes are responsible for change, and how these changes are impacting the socioeconomic livelihoods of the local people. ARCHIVAL SOURCES Special Collections Department University of Nevada, Reno 1664 N. Virginia Street, Mailstop 322 Reno, NV 89557-0322 Bliss Family 1869–1949 14 cubic feet Bliss Family Records The Bliss family developed lumber, tourism, and transportation businesses at Lake Tahoe, especially at Tahoe City, California, and Glenbrook, Nevada, between the late 1860s and the mid-1900s. Principal members included Duane L. (D. L.) Bliss, Duane L. Bliss Jr., Walter D. Bliss, and William S. Bliss. The Bliss family’s history is closely linked to the development of Lake Tahoe. The Bliss records mostly document the history of land acquisition and development at Glenbrook, Nevada, and Tahoe City, California. During the 1890s, as the lumber industry at Tahoe was approaching an end, Duane Bliss began to build three projects: a passenger ship to transport visitors across Lake Tahoe, a railroad to connect Tahoe City with the Southern Pacific Tracks at Truckee, and a luxurious resort hotel at Tahoe City, to be known as the Tahoe Tavern. The collection covers the years 1869 to 1941 and includes a substantial number of legal papers including deeds, patents, leases, agreements, bills of sale, judgments and decrees, abstracts of title, and documents related to options for land acquisition, rights-of-way, water rights, businesses, hotels (Tahoe Tavern and the Glenbrook Hotel), railroads, steamers, and other water vessels. This collection also includes minute books, resolutions, notices of directors’ meetings, articles of incorporation, and bylaws for several Bliss companies including the Lake Tahoe Transportation Company, Lake Tahoe Railway and Transportation Company, Glenbrook Improvement Company, Sierra Realty Company, and Carson and Tahoe Lumber and Fluming Company. Taken together, the legal and corporate records document the interconnected land, transportation, and hotel interests of the Bliss Family. The Bancroft Library University of California Berkeley, CA 94720-6000 Evanoff, Mark 1947–1988 (bulk 1979–1988) 18.65 linear feet Mark Evanoff Papers Mark Evanoff is an antinuclear environmental activist who advocated for opposition to nuclear proliferation, nuclear reactors, and the global nuclear arms race, primarily in California during the 1970s and 1980s. Evanoff and other grassroots antinuclear activists sought to continue the battle to prevent nuclear power plants from being built in California and elsewhere following the successful citizen-led action movement that lobbied against a planned nuclear power plant in Bodega Bay, California, from 1958 to 1964. Working with numerous local and global antinuclear groups, mostly with the Abalone Alliance and the Friends of the Earth, in opposing the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, Evanoff participated in protest actions, mobilized activists, and prepared groups for nonviolent civil disobedience training and legal defense, wrote, collected and disseminated educational literature and resources about nuclear power and disarmament, and wrote articles for Friends of the Earth’s “Not Man Apart” publication. Evanoff was arrested twice for participating in blockades at Diablo Canyon and later served as a consultant to the California Public Utilities Commission, weighing in on seismic factors and their potential to affect the sustainability of the plant. Evanoff received a bachelor of arts in environmental studies at Sonoma State University in 1976 and a master’s degree in public administration from California State University at Hayward in 1977. He continued to work on environmental advocacy throughout his life. This collection documents Mark Evanoff’s interest and involvement in opposing the proliferation of nuclear reactors, primarily in California during the 1970s and 1980s. Materials include correspondence, notes, photographs, legislation, testimony, newsletters, group-organizing resources, pamphlets, and other printed ephemera by numerous antinuclear activist individuals and organizations, energy companies, and local and federal agencies. Archives and Special Collections University of Strathclyde Andersonian Library Curran Building 101 St. James Road Glasgow G4 0NS Geddes, Patrick 1531–1969 148 feet Patrick Geddes Papers Sir Patrick Geddes was a biologist, sociologist, and town planner with a strong interest in education, the arts, history, and many other subjects. He believed strongly in the interrelationships among all branches of knowledge. In 1904 Geddes published his first major report, “City Development: A Study of Parks, Gardens and Culture Institutes,” which enhanced his reputation among architects and planners. After 1900 Geddes’ activities centered on London, where he cofounded the Sociological Society in 1903 and showed his Cities and Town Planning Exhibition in 1911. From 1914 to 1924, Geddes lived mainly in India, where he was involved in town planning. He accepted the chair of sociology and civics at the University of Bombay in 1919. During this period, Geddes designed the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, garden suburbs for Jerusalem and Haifa, settlements elsewhere in Palestine, and the master plan for Tel Aviv. After his return to Europe in 1924, Geddes settled in Montpellier, France. The collection covers most periods of Geddes’ life and nearly all of the places in which he lived and worked. It comprises correspondence, manuscripts, typescripts, pamphlets and books, photographs, maps, plans, prints and drawings, including Geddes’ famous “thinking machines.” Archives & Manuscripts Department University of Hawaii at Manoa Library 2550 McCarthy Mall Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 Gill, Thomas P. (Thomas Ponce) 1950–2005 (bulk 1960s–1970s) 98 linear feet Thomas P. Gill Papers Thomas P. Gill was a member of Congress from Hawaii to the US House of Representatives (1963–64). His political career before and after Congress included serving in the Hawaii Territorial Legislature (1958–59), the Hawaii State Legislature (1959–62), the Hawaii Office of Economic Opportunity (1965–66), and the office of lieutenant governor of Hawaii (1966–70). The bulk of the collection is from Gill’s two years in Congress and in the lieutenant governor’s office. It includes correspondence, reports, photographs, audiovisual items, and memorabilia. It is strong in material documenting his enthusiastic political life and on his concerns about nuclear power; the environment; land development, especially on the Big Island; and the high cost of living in Hawaii, principally for food and housing. University of Rochester Library Department of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Archives Rush Rhees Library Rochester, NY 14627 Korte, Mary Norbert 1966–2010 10 boxes Mary Norbert Korte Papers A former nun, Mary Norbert Korte has been publishing her poetry since the mid-1960s. She lives in Northern California, where she has dedicated herself to the environment, poetry, and teaching. In the fall of 1972, Korte was nominated for a National Endowment award and later that year moved to her current residence in the redwood forest in Mendocino County, California. Along with her writing and activism she became an environmentalist. The collection consists of ten boxes of Korte’s personal papers including correspondence, manuscript and printed material, works by other authors, printed material and ephemera, and biographical documents and materials. Frank Melville Jr. Memorial Library Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY 11794-3300 Long Island Environmental Council, Inc. 1969–1974 4 cubic feet Long Island Environmental Council Records The Long Island Environmental Council was an environmental action nonprofit organization with both individual and corporate membership. Its stated goal was to preserve and promote a livable environment for Long Island. Founded in 1969 by Claire Stern, who served as executive director, the group was created “to present an informed and united force behind efforts to protect, preserve and even so far as it is possible to restore the environment so that it is serenely and healthily habitable.” The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, telephone registers, newsletters, administrative files, and reading files. Special Collections Research Center Syracuse University Libraries 222 Waverly Avenue Syracuse, NY 13244-2010 Milgrom, Jack 1958–2005 11.5 linear feet Jack Milgrom Papers Jack Milgrom was an American researcher and consultant in the plastics field. He received his AB, MS, and PhD degrees from the University of Chicago. He performed research in detergent, petroleum, and elastomers, and worked in the plastics industry for Foster Grant among other companies. In 1968 Milgrom became a consultant with Arthur D. Little, Inc. and moved to SRI International in 1981. He then became the managing director of Walden Research, Inc. in 1983. Milgrom conducted seminars in the United States and Europe on plastics recycling, packaging, and the environment. The Jack Milgrom Papers consists largely of published material and reports collected and written by Milgrom on the subjects of plastics in general, and specifically on the use of plastics in packaging and the recycling of plastics, as well as utility scrap and recycling in the auto industry. State Library of Western Australia 25 Francis Street Perth Cultural Centre Perth WA 6000 Australia Rundle, Graeme 1964–2011 29 boxes Graeme Rundle Papers Graeme Rundle (1944–2012) was born in Perth, Australia. His working life was spent in an administrative role with the Department of Main Roads. Rundle had a lifelong interest in conservation of the environment. Among other groups, he sat on the Conservation Commission for seventeen years as the Conservation Council lobbyist, the Port Kennedy Management Board, the Dieback Consultative Council, and the Pastoral Lands Board; he was a founding member of the Darling Range Forum. In 2006 he received the Conservation Council’s Bessie Rischbieth award for outstanding service. He was posthumously appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in June 2013, “for significant service to conservation and the environment in Western Australia.” The Bancroft Library University of California Berkeley, CA 94720-6000 Steele, Dwight C. 1942–2002 (bulk 1970–2001) 8.75 linear feet Dwight C. Steele Papers Dwight C. Steele was born on January 23, 1914, in Alameda, California. A lawyer practicing in California and Hawaii with an early interest in labor law, he began working pro bono in 1969 for conservation causes and accepted no paying clients after 1980. From 1942 to 1945, he served on the Regional War Labor Board and the Regional War Manpower Commission, and from 1951 to 1952, he was appointed to the National Wage Stabilization Board. Labor work includes that with the Distributors Association of San Francisco, the Hawaii Employers Council, the Lumber and Mill Employers Association, and the Bermuda Employers Council. From 1968 to 1972, he was elected to the office of director of the Alpine Springs Water District. From 1971 to 1978 he was a trustee and treasurer for the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund, and served as general counsel for the League to Save Lake Tahoe beginning in 1989. From 1978 to 1983, he was appointed as a governing body member of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency. The Dwight C. Steele Papers, 1942–2002 (bulk 1970–2001), contain correspondence, subject, and organizational files on various environmental conservation issues, with a particular focus on the San Francisco Bay Area and Lake Tahoe Regions. Frank Melville Jr. Memorial Library Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY 11794-3300 Suffolk Scientists for Cleaner Power and a Safer Environment (NY) 1969–1974 0.8 cubic feet Suffolk Scientists for Cleaner Power and a Safer Environment Collection Suffolk Scientists for Cleaner Power and a Safer Environment was an organization favoring nuclear power generation and the construction and licensing of the Long Island Lighting Company’s Shoreham nuclear power facility. This collection includes hearings, briefs, statements, treasurer records, and more. Texas State Library and Archives 1201 Brazos Street Austin, TX 78701 Texas Water Commission 1970–1991, undated 4 cubic feet Texas Water Commission Edwards Aquifer Correspondence The Texas Water Commission allocates the state’s waters for public benefit by determining an appropriate balance between environmental protection and economic development. Types of records are administrative correspondence, reports, rules, a petition, and maps regarding the Edwards Aquifer, including public hearing documents and rules creating the Edwards Underground Water District. Records date from 1970 to 1991 and undated, bulk 1973 to 1988. Especially well represented in the public hearing documents and other records are the Texas cities of San Antonio and Uvalde. Topics of the public hearings include arriving at an accurate geographic definition of the Edwards Aquifer Recharge Zone and fair regulation of associated pollution and development. Also included are rules designed to regulate activities that could potentially cause pollution affecting the Edwards Aquifer and a petition to create the Union Hill Underground Water Management Area in Callahan County. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Environmental History and the Forest History Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental History Oxford University Press

New Scholarship

Environmental History , Volume 23 (2) – Apr 1, 2018

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Oxford University Press
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© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Environmental History and the Forest History Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
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1084-5453
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1930-8892
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Abstract

THE FOREST HISTORY SOCIETY (FHS) maintains an extensive database of published sources related to environmental history. The “new scholarship” section of this journal includes just a selection of the new information that the FHS library adds each quarter. The library indexes all entries in the database by topic, chronological period, and geographic area. The library staff will gladly provide additional information about items you see in this section or information on other topics from the database. They are happy to respond to requests for full bibliographies or lists of archival collections for specific research projects. The unabridged version of this New Scholarship section is searchable as part of the research databases on our website at www.foresthistory.org. The compiler also welcomes information about relevant publications that the staff may have missed, including books, theses, and dissertations. The compiler particularly welcomes copies of relevant articles. Contact us by mail at New Scholarship, Forest History Society, 701 William Vickers Ave., Durham, NC 27701, USA, by telephone at 919-682-9319, or by email: library@foresthistory.org BOOKS Bacci, Massimo Livi. Our Shrinking Planet. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2017. ix + 149 pp. Figures, tables, notes, index. Provides a broad history of the global population within the context of environmental constraints and the balance of power between nations. Looks at human history from the Stone Age to the twenty-first century, documenting the decreases in available space for every person on the planet Earth and the growing limits to the world’s capacity. Translated into English by David Broder. Bailey, Janette-Susan. Dust Bowl: Depression America to World War Two Australia. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. xxii + 353 pp. Illustrations, bibliography, index. Examines the Dust Bowl as a transnational phenomenon, specifically looking at mythologies surrounding the Dust Bowl in both the United States and Australia during the World War II era. Provides a cultural history of how Dust Bowl imagery was created and interpreted in both nations during this time period. Belonsky, Andrew. The Log Cabin: An Illustrated History. New York: Countryman Press, 2018. 315 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. An illustrated history of the log cabin, detailing how the log cabin uniquely shaped the history and culture of the United States. Details the origins of the log cabin, popular representations of the cabin in culture, and how the cabin played an underrated role in the shaping of America’s culture from the seventeenth through twentieth centuries. Benson, Melinda Harm, and Robin Kundis Craig. The End of Sustainability: Resilience and the Future of Environmental Governance in the Anthropocene. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2017. xiii + 241 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. The authors propose resilience as a more realistic and workable approach to environmental governance in the United States. Includes discussion of a need to shift away from historic American environmental and natural resource laws toward new narratives representing the role of humans within complex ecosystems. Bradley, Ben. British Columbia by the Road: Car Culture and the Making of a Modern Landscape. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2017. xii + 309 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. Provides a cultural and environmental history of the roads and highways through the interior of British Columbia. Looks at how cars and roads provided users with a curated view of the natural landscape. Details how tourism boosters, government officials, and conservationists used road networks to manipulate perceptions of the British Columbia environment. Brooks, Shelley Alden. Big Sur: The Making of a Prized California Landscape. Oakland: University of California Press, 2017. xv + 261 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. A cultural and environmental history of Big Sur, a prized landscape along the central California coast. Looks at the artists and writers who helped popularize and define the Big Sur area as a cultural symbol of California. Also details the public and private partnerships that helped preserve the landscape and provide a model for future coastal preservation throughout California. Carhart, Arthur H., et al. The Last Stand of the Pack: Critical Edition. Boulder: University Press of Colorado. xiii + 290 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Examines the past, present, and future of wolves in Colorado. Originally published in 1929, this work provided a historical account of the extermination of what were believed to be the last wolves in the state. This updated and expanded edition offers a collection of works supplementing the original text that explore the last century of wolf activity and the role of wolves in the Colorado ecosystem. Chaney, Anthony. Runaway: Gregory Bateson, the Double Bind, and the Rise of Ecological Consciousness. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2017. 304 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Examines the work of Gregory Bateson (1904–80), an anthropologist who introduced the double-bind theory of schizophrenia, studied dolphin communication, and was among the first to warn of a greenhouse effect and its impacts on climate change. Focuses on the impacts of his work on raising global ecological consciousness beginning in the 1960s. Dagenais, Michele. Montreal, City of Water: An Environmental History. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2017. xx + 231 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. A history of the water surrounding the city of Montreal, examining the water as both a physical element as well as a sociocultural component of life in the city. Details how water transformed the urban form of Montreal over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Also explores issues related to pollution, water supply, waterfront redevelopment, water access, and more. Translated from French by Peter Feldstein. Danner, Lauren. Crown Jewel Wilderness: Creating North Cascades National Park. Pullman: Washington State University Press, 2017. 320 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Details the history of the North Cascades National Park in Washington. Documents work to establish a national park in the area beginning in the late nineteenth century, the growth of interest in wilderness preservation through the twentieth century, the growth of tourism, renewed efforts to conserve natural landscapes, and the park’s formal creation in 1968. Emmett, Robert S., and David E. Nye. The Environmental Humanities: A Critical Introduction. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2017. viii + 236 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Provides a concise overview of the environmental humanities as an academic discipline. Presents an overview of the field, as well as concepts, issues, current research, examples, case studies, and more. Explores how the humanities can improve understanding of environmental problems and issues. Hoover, Elizabeth. The River in Us: Fighting Toxics in a Mohawk Community. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017. xviii + 372 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. An in-depth study of Akwesasne, a Mohawk community in upstate New York, looking at the community’s fight for environmental justice over the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Details the effort taken by the local population to combat the environmental contamination from nearby Superfund sites, and the work done to reclaim the community’s landscape, health, and culture. Johnson, Nick. Grass Roots: A History of Cannabis in the American West. Corvallis: Oregon State University Press, 2017. xiv + 234 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. A history of marijuana growing in the western United States from the early twentieth through the early twenty-first century. Looks at developments in growing technology, the impacts of Prohibition, environmental aspects of cannabis growing, and more. Overall provides a detailed history of the cannabis plant from an agricultural and environmental point of view. Kiernan, Denise. The Last Castle: The Epic Story of Love, Loss, and American Royalty in the Nation’s Largest Home. New York: Touchstone, 2017. 388 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. Details the stories behind the lives of Edith and George Vanderbilt, and the building and management of the Biltmore estate near Asheville, North Carolina. Includes discussion of Gifford Pinchot, Carl Schenck, the Biltmore Forest School, forest management at the estate, and the creation of Pisgah National Forest. Lee, Debbie, and Kathryn Newfont, eds. The Land Speaks: New Voices at the Intersection of Oral and Environmental History. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. xiii + 305 pp. Illustrations, index. A collection of works examining the intersection of the field of oral history and environmental studies. Looks at how the use of oral histories can bring a greater understanding of issues related to public land and the environment. Topics include African American smoke jumpers, the work of women to conserve the Indiana Dunes, the impacts of flooding in the Savannah River Valley, urban gardens in Philadelphia, and much more. Leeming, Mark R. In Defence of Home Places: Environmental Activism in Nova Scotia. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2017. xxvii + 208 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. A history of the growth and evolution of environmental activism in Nova Scotia over the late twentieth century. Details the successes of the environmental movement, disagreements and divisions within the movement, and gradual weakening of the collective activism. Also places the environmental activism seen in Nova Scotia within broader national and international contexts. Mancall, Peter C. Nature and Culture in the Early Modern Atlantic. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017. xiv + 197 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. Explores how Europeans and Native Americans thought about the natural world during the century following the ocean voyages of Christopher Columbus. Looks at shifts in thinking during this period about the Atlantic ecological world as views adapted from the medieval to the modern period. Draws from written and oral records, as well as art, to document real and imaginary plants and animals of the sixteenth-century Atlantic world. Marran, Christine L. Ecology without Culture: Aesthetics for a Toxic World. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017. 182 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. Author looks at how biological elements from the material world have proven to be such an effective medium for representing culture, from cherry blossoms in Japan to amber waves of grain in the United States. Also examines representations of toxic events in literature, poetry, and film. Pearson, Thomas W. When the Hills Are Gone: Frac Sands Mining and the Struggle for Community. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017. 248 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. A history of sand mining in Wisconsin during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Details the growth of sand mining relative to the fracking industry, the mobilization of local groups opposed to sand mining, and the environmental impacts seen throughout the state during this time period. Perkins, John H. Changing Energy: The Transition to a Sustainable Future. Oakland: University of California Press, 2017. xix + 343 pp. Illustrations, figures, tables, notes, index. Explores the past and future of human transitions through various energy economies around the world. Looks at the use of coal, oil, gas, and uranium as energy sources, and the ongoing transition to renewable resources. Also discusses the impacts of the energy economy on the environment, politics, and climate change. Ranzoni, Patricia. Still Mill: Poems, Stories and Songs of Making Paper in Bucksport, Maine, 1930–2014. Unity: North Country Press, 2017. Documents the life and death of a paper mill, its workers, and its culture in Bucksport, Maine, between 1930 and 2014. Provides a collection of songs and stories documenting the culture of those who lived in a paper mill community during this time period. Sayen, Jamie. You Had a Job for Life: Story of a Company Town. Hanover: University Press of New England, 2018. 283 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. A detailed historical portrait of a company town, Groveton, New Hampshire, a community built around the fortunes of a pulp and paper mill for much of the twentieth century. Documents the changes in ownership, the impacts of global business trends, and the eventual closure of the mill in 2007. Also provides a worker-level view of life within the pulp and paper industry throughout the twentieth century and its importance to the local economy. Tsing, Anna Lowenhaupt, et al., eds. Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017. 348 pp. Illustrations, figures. A collection of essays by scholars from various disciplines looking at landscapes haunted by the violence of modernity or interspecies and intraspecies sociality. Discusses human-induced environmental changes threatening multispecies livability. Weckerly, Butch. Population Ecology of Roosevelt Elk: Conservation and Management in Redwood National and State Parks. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2017. xvii + 190 pp. Illustrations, maps, figures, bibliography, index. Author draws on a study spanning over twenty years to provide detailed observations of the Roosevelt elk populations in the parks along California’s north coast. Documents the dynamics of the elk populations and provides information on the ecology of big game animals and wildlife in the Redwood State and National Parks. White, Dan. Under the Stars: How America Fell in Love with Camping. New York: Henry Holt, 2016. 401 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. Combines personal narrative about camping in the wild with a history of the evolution of outdoor recreation in the United States. Details how the American wilderness evolved from a forbidden place to a source of relaxation and adventure. Highlights the individuals who have impacted American views toward camping and the great outdoors. White, Sam. The Little Ice Age and Europe’s Encounter with North America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2017. xii + 361 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. Looks at the impact of the Little Ice Age on the encounters of early Europeans with the landscape of North America during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Combining research in history, climatology, and archaeology, this work examines how the severity of the winter climate directly threatened early European settlements. Wilk, Christopher. Plywood: A Material Story. New York: Thames & Hudson, 2017. 240 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Provides an illustrated history of plywood in England and the United States. Details the creation process and the many uses for plywood from the eighteenth through the twenty-first centuries. Includes discussion of debates over veneer plywood, the use of plywood in airplanes and automobiles, plywood in architecture, and much more. Woods, Rebecca J. H. The Herds Shot Round the World: Native Breeds and the British Empire, 1800–1900. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2017. xiii + 233 pp. Illustrations, figures, notes, bibliography, index. Details the impact of British imperialism and colonial expansion on the breeding and production of sheep and cattle livestock during the nineteenth century. Explores the creation of so-called native British breeds of sheep and cattle, failed attempts to naturalize Spanish merino sheep in England, the exporting of Hereford cattle, and the development of colonial hybrid breeds throughout the British Empire. ARTICLES Baker, Andrew C. “Metropolitan Growth Along the Nation’s River: Power, Waste, and Environmental Politics in a Northern Virginia County, 1943–1971.” Journal of Urban History 43 (September 2017): 703–19. Looks at the impacts of population growth and urban development in the area outside Washington. D.C., during the postwar period. Details the history of the agricultural area of Loudoun County, Virginia, from the 1940s to the 1970s as it faced six proposed urban infrastructure projects. Discusses the responses and interaction between the federal government, urban interest groups, local governments, and grassroots environmentalists. De Graef, Pieter. “The Peasant Route to Innovation: Fertilizer Improvement in the Smallholding Economy of Eighteenth-Century Flanders, Belgium.” Agricultural History 91 (Fall 2017): 488–512. Analyzes the introduction of new agricultural knowledge in peasant regions and the ways in which smallholding families gained confidence to adopt new approaches to their farming activities. Details the impacts of two innovative fertilizer improvements, animal urine and lime, in the eighteenth-century smallholding economy of Inland Flanders. Dethier, Jean-Jacques. “Trash, Cities, and Politics: Urban Environmental Problems in Indonesia.” Indonesia 103 (April 2017): 73–90. Describes the history and effectiveness of an environmental program begun in Indonesia during the 1980s to focus on waste management, cleanliness and sanitation, and green spaces. Discusses the program within the larger context of Indonesia’s ongoing urbanization and its negative environmental consequences. Dobkins, Rebecca, et al. “Tribes of the Oregon Country: Cultural Plant Harvests and Indigenous Relationships with Ancestral Lands in the Twenty-First Century.” Oregon Historical Quarterly 118 (Winter 2017): 488–517. Provides research into the harvesting of plants by tribal people in Oregon on ancestral lands now held by the US Forest Service. Looks at the historic uses of forest and rangeland resources by Native Americans, legal issues over land access, and the ongoing cultural importance of plants such as bear grass (Xerophyllum tenax). Firtova, Magdalena. “Oil Sands in European Media: Representations of the Canadian Oil Sands in European Newspapers, 2008–2013.” Journal of Canadian Studies 51 (Winter 2017): 186–216. Analyzes how leading European newspapers reported on oil-sands production in Canada during the early twenty-first century. Suggests that European coverage adopted a critical perspective based on the environmental impacts of oil-sands development, although results did vary in specifics by country. Hauser, Jason. “‘A Golden Harvest’: Gold Mining and Agricultural Reform in North Carolina, 1799–1842.” Agricultural History 91 (Fall 2017): 469–87. Details the ensuing debates following the 1799 discovery of gold in the North Carolina piedmont region. Examines the conflicts over issues related to gold extraction such as proper land management, the relationship between industry and agriculture, early national agricultural reform, and economic boosterism. Hemo, Eran, and Ravit Linn. “Sustainable Conservation of Archaeological Sites with Local Communities: The Case Study of Tel Yoqne’am, Israel.” Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology & Heritage Studies 5, no. 3–4 (2017): 411–26. Discusses the lack of conservation strategies surrounding archaeological sites and the resulting neglect and deterioration. Documents the involvement of a local community in conserving an archaeological site at Tel Yoqne’am, Israel, showing the clear advantage of collaborating with local communities in the sustainable conservation of sites. Holleland, Herdis. “Caged for Protection: Exploring the Paradoxes of Protecting New Zealand’s Dactylanthus Taylorii.” Environment and History 23 (November 2017): 545–67. Studies the history and impact of conservation efforts to save Dactylanthus taylorii, a native New Zealand plant. Discusses debates over conservation of native and nonnative species, as well as the cultural importance of saving native plants and animals from extinction. Loadenthal, Michael. “‘Eco-Terrorism’: An Incident-Driven History of Attack (1973–2010).” Journal for the Study of Radicalism 11 (Fall 2017): 1–34. Documents the history of radical activist groups such as the Earth Liberation Front, the Band of Mercy, and the Animal Liberation Front between 1973 and 2010. Looks at how the animal and earth liberation movements interacted historically and ideologically within a realm of politicized violence and militant social protest throughout the world. McCaskie, Tom C. “‘The Art or Mystery of Physick’—Asante Medicinal Plants and the Western Ordering of Botanical Knowledge.” History in Africa: A Journal of Method 44 (June 2017): 27–62. Examines the medicinal plants collected in the West African forest kingdom of Asante in 1817 by Henry Tedlie, a member of the well-known English mission led by Thomas Bowdich. Discusses the influence of Europeans on the eventual classification of these plants in a Western authorized botanical taxonomy that is now used worldwide. McFarlane, Wallace Scot. “Oil on the Farm: The East Texas Oil Boom and the Origins of an Energy Economy.” The Journal of Southern History 83 (November 2017): 853–88. Provides an environmental history of the East Texas oil boom during the 1930s. Details the relationships between the petroleum revolution during this time period and agriculture, land ownership, labor, the political economy, and the local environment. Moscato, Derek. “Fukushima Fallout in Japanese Manga.” Journal of Communication Inquiry 41 (October 2017): 382–402. Details fictionalized accounts in Japanese manga of the environmental and health hazards for residents living near the Fukushima nuclear plant. Explores the ethical implications of such portrayals in a fictionalized medium against the unique backdrop of Japan’s evolving media landscape and tumultuous recent environmental history. Nixon, Sean J. “Vanishing Peregrines: J. A. Baker, Environmental Crisis and Bird-Centred Cultures of Nature, 1954–73.” Rural History 28 (October 2017): 205–26. Uses J. A. Baker’s book The Peregrine (1967) to place Baker’s writing within a broader field of postwar observation and publication that worked to shape new ways of understanding and taking pleasure from the natural environment. Details the recording practices and publications of English naturalist and bird-watching societies that flourished in these years. Obraczka, Marcelo, et al. “Analysis of Coastal Environmental Management Practices in Subregions of California and Brazil.” Journal of Coastal Research 33 (November 2017): 1315–32. Presents a case study of coastal and environmental management systems in the urbanized area of the central coast of California and the developing coastal lowlands of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, over the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Argues that transparency and accessibility to the decision-making process are essential to the success of coastal environmental management in both areas. Pumphrey, Clint, and Jim Kichas. “From Tire Tracks to Treasure Trail: Cooperative Boosterism along U.S. Highway 89.” Utah Historical Quarterly 85 (Summer 2017): 257–72. Looks at the history of boosterism and tourism promotion surrounding Highway 89 to bring new people to Utah and the American West during the early twentieth century. Details efforts to promote the scenic wonders and undeveloped agricultural and mineral resources along the route as a way to attract both tourists and home seekers to the area. Ruuskanen, Esa, and Kari Väyrynen. “Theory and Prospects of Environmental History.” Rethinking History 21 (December 2017): 456–73. Analyzes the theoretical and philosophical starting points of the study of environmental history. Looks at the long-term evolution of ecologically aware historical writing from the early nineteenth century onward and the emergence of the academic field of environmental history in the United States and Europe over the second half of the twentieth century. Satpathy, Bijayashree. “Forest Rights Act Implementation in Odisha.” South Asia Research 37 (November 2017): 259–76. Examines issues surrounding India’s Forest Rights Act and the rights over access to forest resources by local forest dwellers. Includes discussion of the history of forest-dependent communities and forest conservation, with a focus on two villages of the Mayurbhanj district in Odisha. Simmons, David A. “Silent Channels: Building Standard Oil’s Pipeline Empire.” Timeline 34 (October–December 2017): 44–53. Details the efforts surrounding the early construction of natural gas pipelines through Ohio during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Looks at the work done by Standard Oil to maximize use of natural gas and to build pipelines, and the environmental impacts of extraction. Skopyk, Bradley. “Rivers of God, Rivers of Empire: Climate Extremes, Environmental Transformation and Agroecology in Colonial Mexico.” Environment and History 23 (November 2017): 491–522. A study of the ecological impacts of the Little Ice Age on colonial Mexico from 1300 to 1850. Details the increase in major flood events during this time period and their long-term effects on colonial agricultural systems. Stevenson, C. Ian. “Introducing Environmental History into Vernacular Architecture: Considerations from New England’s Historic Dams.” Buildings & Landscapes 24 (Fall 2017): 1–21. Explores the relationships between environmental history and the vernacular architecture of historic dams in the New England region. Looks at the removal and demolition of various dams in the region for public health and environmental reasons over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topham, Dale. “Staking Claims on the Markagunt Plateau: Creation of Cedar Breaks National Monument, 1916–1934.” Utah Historical Quarterly 85 (Summer 2017): 238–56. A history of the creation of Cedar Breaks National Monument in Utah focusing on efforts made between 1916 and 1934. Documents disagreements between local residents, tourism promoters, state conservation agencies, the US Forest Service, and the National Park Service. Reveals prevailing debates over public lands management during this period. Vansant, Jacqueline. “Austrian and Dustbowl Refugees Unite in ‘Three Faces West’ (1940).” Journal of Austrian-American History 1, no. 1 (2017): 98–116. Looks at the 1940 film Three Faces West and its depiction of environmental and social issues through its story of an Austrian-American romance. The film uses the dire situation of farmers in a drought-ravaged area to elicit sympathy for the refugees from Europe and to challenge nativist and isolationist attitudes. Vaughan, David K. “The Au Sable River Lumberman’s Monument: William B. Mershon’s Struggle to Create a Meaningful Memorial of the Michigan Lumbering Era.” Michigan Historical Review 43 (Fall 2017): 1–36. Provides a detailed history of the Lumberman’s Monument, a bronze statue dedicated to the lumber industry, located on Au Sable River west of Oscoda, Michigan. Intended to serve as a monument to Michigan’s pioneer lumbermen of the nineteenth century, the statue was erected in 1932 at a time of growing concern over the need for a more balanced approach to forest management and conservation. Vo Phun, Juily lyn. “Health Brokers: Chinese Herbal Doctors, Medical Tourism, and Medical Advertisements in Southern California, 1900–1941.” Amerasia Journal 43, no. 2 (2017): 47–78. Provides a history of Chinese herbal medicine physicians in Southern California between 1900 and 1941. Discusses the marketing of herbal medicines, the influence of Chinese herbal remedies on the greater medical profession, and the history of public health in California. Wegner, Janice. “A Weed by Any Other Name: Problems with Defining Weeds in Tropical Queensland.” Environment and History 23 (November 2017): 523–44. An exploration of the history of issues related to environmental labeling, in this case looking at plants characterized as weeds. Examines the moral judgments behind the labeling of plants as weeds or invasive or harmful in the Australian state of Queens, and how the threat of such plants can change over time. Weimer, Daniel. “The Politics of Contamination: Herbicides, Drug Control, and Environmental Law.” Diplomatic History 41 (November 2017): 847–73. Examines the politics of contamination concerning herbicides and the use of drug control policy as a venue to enact a stronger role for environmental law in US foreign policy during the late twentieth century. Focuses on the controversy surrounding the use of paraquat-laced marijuana in the drug crop defoliation program in Mexico during the 1970s. Details the politics of toxic chemicals and public health, especially in regard to international policy. Withers, Jeremy. “Bicycles Across the Galaxy: Attacking Automobility in 1950s Science Fiction.” Science Fiction Studies 44 (November 2017): 417–36. Studies several works of science fiction from the 1950s that function as counternarratives to the hegemony of the automobile during this decade. Details how various novels and short stories chose to portray bicycles as useful transportation for adults, images that counter the prevailing ideology of the car that was crystallizing with such durability in postwar America. Zelko, Frank. “Scaling Greenpeace: From Local Activism to Global Governance.” Historical Social Research 42, no. 2 (2017): 318–42. Documents the evolution and growth of Greenpeace from the 1970s through the 1990s. Details how the organization, founded as an antinuclear protest group in Vancouver in the early 1970s, grew into the world’s largest environmental nongovernmental organization. Zou, Yi, et al. “The Decline of Pingcheng: Climate Change Impact, Vulnerability and Adaptation in the Northern Wei Dynasty, China.” Journal of Historical Geography 58 (October 2017): 12–22. Explores the environmental factors behind the Northern Wei dynasty unexpectedly moving its capital from Pingcheng to Luoyang in 494 ce. Looks at the possible impacts of climate change, droughts, population growth, and other natural disasters. DISSERTATIONS AND THESES Bender, John Elijahn. “Wind, Forest, Fire, and Mountain: The Evolution of Environmental Management and Local Society in Central Japan, 1450–1650.” PhD dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2017. 239 pp. Examines how people dealt with environmental challenges and disputes during Japan’s late medieval period (ca. 1450–1600), an age of instability, institutional failure, and war. The implementation of environmental management during this time period proved crucial in ending a long period of warfare and formed the basis of an even longer era of stability. Biswas, Sravani. “The Political Tempest ‘Natural’ Disasters and Politics in India and Bangladesh, 1876 & 1970.” PhD dissertation, Syracuse University, 2017. 226 pp. Uses case studies of the Great Backurgunge Cyclone of 1876 and the Bhola Cyclone of 1970 to explore relationships between the state and other parties surrounding natural disaster events in India and Bangladesh. Argues that while hazards like cyclones are natural in origin, their effects depend on the socioeconomic and political positioning of the human actors, and they can also act as catalysts for change. Halvorson, George Charles. “Valuing the Air: The Politics of Environmental Governance from the Clean Air Act to Carbon Trading.” PhD dissertation, Columbia University, 2017. 408 pp. Documents the history of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) embracing the new field of environmental economics, funding pioneering research that concluded the benefits of environmental protection outweighed the costs. This ran contrary to environmentalist notions of priceless nature, causing environmental advocates to fight to prevent the EPA from fully adopting a cost-benefit approach to policymaking. Hill, Jonathan. “Crossing the Atlantic: Carl Schenck and the Formation of American Forestry.” Honor’s thesis, Duke University, 2017. 92 pp. Explores the work of German forester Carl Alwin Schenck (1868–1955) in the United States at the beginning of the twentieth century, detailing his contributions to the formation of American forestry. Reestablishes Schenck’s presence in the historical timeline of the early conservation movement and argues for the important influence Schenck had on the foundations of forestry in the United States. Munger, Michael Sean. “Ten Years of Winter: The Cold Decade and Environmental Consciousness in the Early 19th Century.” PhD dissertation, University of Oregon, 2017. 355 pp. Details the history of two volcanic eruptions in 1809 and 1815 that shrouded the earth in sulfur dioxide and triggered a series of weather and climate anomalies. This resulted in a “Cold Decade,” a period defined by scientists from 1810 to 1819. This study examines the development of a Cold Decade environmental consciousness found in people in both the United States and Europe. Novikau, Aliaksandr. “Environmental Discourses in Belarus: Issues and Ideologies.” PhD dissertation, Northern Arizona University, 2017. 229 pp. Studies the changes in environmental discourses in the Republic of Belarus from 1985 to 2014 and the factors that caused these changes. Reveals the environmental issues and environmental ideologies that were prioritized in Belarus during this period. Olsen, Susan Annette. “Environmental Relocation Policy as Experienced by One Eastern Missouri Dioxin-Contaminated Community.” PhD dissertation, Walden University, 2017. 334 pp. Provides insight into the long-term social impacts of the Environmental Protection Agency’s environmental relocation policy. Uses data collected from the environmental relocation of one dioxin-contaminated community in eastern Missouri, documenting individuals who lived in the community during the 1970s and 1980s. Stanford-McIntyre, Sarah S. “Refining the Desert: The Politics of Wealth, Industrialization, and Environmental Risk in the Twentieth-Century Texas Oil Industry.” PhD dissertation, The College of William and Mary, 2017. 367 pp. Uses labor, environmental, and technological history to describe seventy years of West Texas oil expansion and decline juxtaposed against a growing environmental and public health crisis. Argues that a workplace culture of individualistic risk taking coupled with industry propaganda that bred a utopian faith in technology was reinforced by the region’s punishing geography, general isolation, and the limits of industrial infrastructure. Vitous, Crystal Ann. “Impacts of Tourism Development on Livelihoods in Placencia Village, Belize.” Master’s thesis, University of South Florida, 2017. 115 pp. Examines the political-ecologic dimensions of rapid tourism expansion in southern Belize over the early twenty-first century by investigating how the health of the environment is perceived, what processes are responsible for change, and how these changes are impacting the socioeconomic livelihoods of the local people. ARCHIVAL SOURCES Special Collections Department University of Nevada, Reno 1664 N. Virginia Street, Mailstop 322 Reno, NV 89557-0322 Bliss Family 1869–1949 14 cubic feet Bliss Family Records The Bliss family developed lumber, tourism, and transportation businesses at Lake Tahoe, especially at Tahoe City, California, and Glenbrook, Nevada, between the late 1860s and the mid-1900s. Principal members included Duane L. (D. L.) Bliss, Duane L. Bliss Jr., Walter D. Bliss, and William S. Bliss. The Bliss family’s history is closely linked to the development of Lake Tahoe. The Bliss records mostly document the history of land acquisition and development at Glenbrook, Nevada, and Tahoe City, California. During the 1890s, as the lumber industry at Tahoe was approaching an end, Duane Bliss began to build three projects: a passenger ship to transport visitors across Lake Tahoe, a railroad to connect Tahoe City with the Southern Pacific Tracks at Truckee, and a luxurious resort hotel at Tahoe City, to be known as the Tahoe Tavern. The collection covers the years 1869 to 1941 and includes a substantial number of legal papers including deeds, patents, leases, agreements, bills of sale, judgments and decrees, abstracts of title, and documents related to options for land acquisition, rights-of-way, water rights, businesses, hotels (Tahoe Tavern and the Glenbrook Hotel), railroads, steamers, and other water vessels. This collection also includes minute books, resolutions, notices of directors’ meetings, articles of incorporation, and bylaws for several Bliss companies including the Lake Tahoe Transportation Company, Lake Tahoe Railway and Transportation Company, Glenbrook Improvement Company, Sierra Realty Company, and Carson and Tahoe Lumber and Fluming Company. Taken together, the legal and corporate records document the interconnected land, transportation, and hotel interests of the Bliss Family. The Bancroft Library University of California Berkeley, CA 94720-6000 Evanoff, Mark 1947–1988 (bulk 1979–1988) 18.65 linear feet Mark Evanoff Papers Mark Evanoff is an antinuclear environmental activist who advocated for opposition to nuclear proliferation, nuclear reactors, and the global nuclear arms race, primarily in California during the 1970s and 1980s. Evanoff and other grassroots antinuclear activists sought to continue the battle to prevent nuclear power plants from being built in California and elsewhere following the successful citizen-led action movement that lobbied against a planned nuclear power plant in Bodega Bay, California, from 1958 to 1964. Working with numerous local and global antinuclear groups, mostly with the Abalone Alliance and the Friends of the Earth, in opposing the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, Evanoff participated in protest actions, mobilized activists, and prepared groups for nonviolent civil disobedience training and legal defense, wrote, collected and disseminated educational literature and resources about nuclear power and disarmament, and wrote articles for Friends of the Earth’s “Not Man Apart” publication. Evanoff was arrested twice for participating in blockades at Diablo Canyon and later served as a consultant to the California Public Utilities Commission, weighing in on seismic factors and their potential to affect the sustainability of the plant. Evanoff received a bachelor of arts in environmental studies at Sonoma State University in 1976 and a master’s degree in public administration from California State University at Hayward in 1977. He continued to work on environmental advocacy throughout his life. This collection documents Mark Evanoff’s interest and involvement in opposing the proliferation of nuclear reactors, primarily in California during the 1970s and 1980s. Materials include correspondence, notes, photographs, legislation, testimony, newsletters, group-organizing resources, pamphlets, and other printed ephemera by numerous antinuclear activist individuals and organizations, energy companies, and local and federal agencies. Archives and Special Collections University of Strathclyde Andersonian Library Curran Building 101 St. James Road Glasgow G4 0NS Geddes, Patrick 1531–1969 148 feet Patrick Geddes Papers Sir Patrick Geddes was a biologist, sociologist, and town planner with a strong interest in education, the arts, history, and many other subjects. He believed strongly in the interrelationships among all branches of knowledge. In 1904 Geddes published his first major report, “City Development: A Study of Parks, Gardens and Culture Institutes,” which enhanced his reputation among architects and planners. After 1900 Geddes’ activities centered on London, where he cofounded the Sociological Society in 1903 and showed his Cities and Town Planning Exhibition in 1911. From 1914 to 1924, Geddes lived mainly in India, where he was involved in town planning. He accepted the chair of sociology and civics at the University of Bombay in 1919. During this period, Geddes designed the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, garden suburbs for Jerusalem and Haifa, settlements elsewhere in Palestine, and the master plan for Tel Aviv. After his return to Europe in 1924, Geddes settled in Montpellier, France. The collection covers most periods of Geddes’ life and nearly all of the places in which he lived and worked. It comprises correspondence, manuscripts, typescripts, pamphlets and books, photographs, maps, plans, prints and drawings, including Geddes’ famous “thinking machines.” Archives & Manuscripts Department University of Hawaii at Manoa Library 2550 McCarthy Mall Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 Gill, Thomas P. (Thomas Ponce) 1950–2005 (bulk 1960s–1970s) 98 linear feet Thomas P. Gill Papers Thomas P. Gill was a member of Congress from Hawaii to the US House of Representatives (1963–64). His political career before and after Congress included serving in the Hawaii Territorial Legislature (1958–59), the Hawaii State Legislature (1959–62), the Hawaii Office of Economic Opportunity (1965–66), and the office of lieutenant governor of Hawaii (1966–70). The bulk of the collection is from Gill’s two years in Congress and in the lieutenant governor’s office. It includes correspondence, reports, photographs, audiovisual items, and memorabilia. It is strong in material documenting his enthusiastic political life and on his concerns about nuclear power; the environment; land development, especially on the Big Island; and the high cost of living in Hawaii, principally for food and housing. University of Rochester Library Department of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Archives Rush Rhees Library Rochester, NY 14627 Korte, Mary Norbert 1966–2010 10 boxes Mary Norbert Korte Papers A former nun, Mary Norbert Korte has been publishing her poetry since the mid-1960s. She lives in Northern California, where she has dedicated herself to the environment, poetry, and teaching. In the fall of 1972, Korte was nominated for a National Endowment award and later that year moved to her current residence in the redwood forest in Mendocino County, California. Along with her writing and activism she became an environmentalist. The collection consists of ten boxes of Korte’s personal papers including correspondence, manuscript and printed material, works by other authors, printed material and ephemera, and biographical documents and materials. Frank Melville Jr. Memorial Library Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY 11794-3300 Long Island Environmental Council, Inc. 1969–1974 4 cubic feet Long Island Environmental Council Records The Long Island Environmental Council was an environmental action nonprofit organization with both individual and corporate membership. Its stated goal was to preserve and promote a livable environment for Long Island. Founded in 1969 by Claire Stern, who served as executive director, the group was created “to present an informed and united force behind efforts to protect, preserve and even so far as it is possible to restore the environment so that it is serenely and healthily habitable.” The collection includes correspondence, memoranda, telephone registers, newsletters, administrative files, and reading files. Special Collections Research Center Syracuse University Libraries 222 Waverly Avenue Syracuse, NY 13244-2010 Milgrom, Jack 1958–2005 11.5 linear feet Jack Milgrom Papers Jack Milgrom was an American researcher and consultant in the plastics field. He received his AB, MS, and PhD degrees from the University of Chicago. He performed research in detergent, petroleum, and elastomers, and worked in the plastics industry for Foster Grant among other companies. In 1968 Milgrom became a consultant with Arthur D. Little, Inc. and moved to SRI International in 1981. He then became the managing director of Walden Research, Inc. in 1983. Milgrom conducted seminars in the United States and Europe on plastics recycling, packaging, and the environment. The Jack Milgrom Papers consists largely of published material and reports collected and written by Milgrom on the subjects of plastics in general, and specifically on the use of plastics in packaging and the recycling of plastics, as well as utility scrap and recycling in the auto industry. State Library of Western Australia 25 Francis Street Perth Cultural Centre Perth WA 6000 Australia Rundle, Graeme 1964–2011 29 boxes Graeme Rundle Papers Graeme Rundle (1944–2012) was born in Perth, Australia. His working life was spent in an administrative role with the Department of Main Roads. Rundle had a lifelong interest in conservation of the environment. Among other groups, he sat on the Conservation Commission for seventeen years as the Conservation Council lobbyist, the Port Kennedy Management Board, the Dieback Consultative Council, and the Pastoral Lands Board; he was a founding member of the Darling Range Forum. In 2006 he received the Conservation Council’s Bessie Rischbieth award for outstanding service. He was posthumously appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in June 2013, “for significant service to conservation and the environment in Western Australia.” The Bancroft Library University of California Berkeley, CA 94720-6000 Steele, Dwight C. 1942–2002 (bulk 1970–2001) 8.75 linear feet Dwight C. Steele Papers Dwight C. Steele was born on January 23, 1914, in Alameda, California. A lawyer practicing in California and Hawaii with an early interest in labor law, he began working pro bono in 1969 for conservation causes and accepted no paying clients after 1980. From 1942 to 1945, he served on the Regional War Labor Board and the Regional War Manpower Commission, and from 1951 to 1952, he was appointed to the National Wage Stabilization Board. Labor work includes that with the Distributors Association of San Francisco, the Hawaii Employers Council, the Lumber and Mill Employers Association, and the Bermuda Employers Council. From 1968 to 1972, he was elected to the office of director of the Alpine Springs Water District. From 1971 to 1978 he was a trustee and treasurer for the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund, and served as general counsel for the League to Save Lake Tahoe beginning in 1989. From 1978 to 1983, he was appointed as a governing body member of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency. The Dwight C. Steele Papers, 1942–2002 (bulk 1970–2001), contain correspondence, subject, and organizational files on various environmental conservation issues, with a particular focus on the San Francisco Bay Area and Lake Tahoe Regions. Frank Melville Jr. Memorial Library Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY 11794-3300 Suffolk Scientists for Cleaner Power and a Safer Environment (NY) 1969–1974 0.8 cubic feet Suffolk Scientists for Cleaner Power and a Safer Environment Collection Suffolk Scientists for Cleaner Power and a Safer Environment was an organization favoring nuclear power generation and the construction and licensing of the Long Island Lighting Company’s Shoreham nuclear power facility. This collection includes hearings, briefs, statements, treasurer records, and more. Texas State Library and Archives 1201 Brazos Street Austin, TX 78701 Texas Water Commission 1970–1991, undated 4 cubic feet Texas Water Commission Edwards Aquifer Correspondence The Texas Water Commission allocates the state’s waters for public benefit by determining an appropriate balance between environmental protection and economic development. Types of records are administrative correspondence, reports, rules, a petition, and maps regarding the Edwards Aquifer, including public hearing documents and rules creating the Edwards Underground Water District. Records date from 1970 to 1991 and undated, bulk 1973 to 1988. Especially well represented in the public hearing documents and other records are the Texas cities of San Antonio and Uvalde. Topics of the public hearings include arriving at an accurate geographic definition of the Edwards Aquifer Recharge Zone and fair regulation of associated pollution and development. Also included are rules designed to regulate activities that could potentially cause pollution affecting the Edwards Aquifer and a petition to create the Union Hill Underground Water Management Area in Callahan County. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Environmental History and the Forest History Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

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Environmental HistoryOxford University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2018

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