New Scholarship

New Scholarship THE FOREST HISTORY SOCIETY (FHS) maintains an extensive database of published sources related to environmental history. The “new scholarship” section of this journal includes just a selection of the new information that the FHS library adds each quarter. The library indexes all entries in the database by topic, chronological period, and geographic area. The library staff will gladly provide additional information about items you see in this section or information on other topics from the database. They are happy to respond to requests for full bibliographies or lists of archival collections for specific research projects. The unabridged version of this New Scholarship section is searchable as part of the research databases on our website at www.foresthistory.org. The compiler also welcomes information about relevant publications that the staff may have missed, including books, theses, and dissertations. The compiler particularly welcomes copies of relevant articles. Contact us by mail at New Scholarship, Forest History Society, 701 William Vickers Ave., Durham, NC 27701, USA, by telephone at 919-682-9319, or by email: library@foresthistory.org BOOKS Bekele, Getnet. Ploughing New Ground: Food, Farming and Environmental Change in Ethiopia. Woodbridge: James Currey, 2017. xv + 207 pp. Maps, tables, bibliography, index. Presents a history of agrarian politics and environmental change and transformation in the lake region of Ethiopia from the late nineteenth to early twenty-first centuries. Details the politics of food supply, the impacts of foreign investment, ongoing agricultural development, and how they influenced small farmers and local populations in the lake region over this time period. Buckley, Eve E. Technocrats and the Politics of Drought and Development in Twentieth-Century Brazil. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2017. xiv + 279 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. Details how technology and water engineering were used as instruments of reform and economic development in twentieth-century Brazil. Looks at how dam construction, irrigation projects, and public health initiatives were implemented to solve a drought crisis and end poverty yet led to unexpected environmental consequences. Clifford, Jim. West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshland, 1839–1914. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2017. xxiii + 214 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. An environmental and social history of the East London suburb of West Ham and the Lower Lea Valley from 1839 to 1914. Looks at the industrialization of this marshland ecosystem, and the impacts of poverty, pollution, water shortages, and disease on the area’s population. Examines how environmental conditions in West Ham during this time period influenced urban policies for London as a whole. Corona, Gabriella. A Short Environmental History of Italy: Variety and Vulnerability. Winwick: White Horse Press, 2017. 147 pp. Illustrations, maps, bibliography, index. An overview of the environmental history of Italy, focused on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Details the use of natural resources and the associated environmental and social consequences, as well as the many forces that have helped shape the Italian landscape over this time period. The book is divided into four sections, corresponding with pivotal moments in modern Italian history. Corona, Gabriella. Venomous Encounters: Snakes, Vivisection and Scientific Medicine in Colonial Australia. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2017. xiii + 202 pp. Illustrations, bibliography, index. A history of the treatment of snakes in colonial Australia between 1788 and World War I. Details the study of snakes, the adoption of vivisection (experiments on living animals), and the use of snake bites or venom injections on dogs, pigs, and cattle during this time period. Dilsaver, Lary M. Preserving the Desert: A History of Joshua Tree National Park. Staunton: George F. Thompson, 2016. 472 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. A detailed history of Joshua Tree National Park, located in the desert of Southern California. Looks at the area’s establishment as a national monument in the 1930s and its designation as a national park in 1994. Examines the work done over the twentieth century to manage and protect this unique desert ecosystem. Engel-Pearson, Kim. Writing Arizona, 1912–2012: A Cultural and Environmental Chronicle. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2017. xi + 292 pp. Notes, bibliography, index. Provides analysis of written sources documenting the evolution of Arizona’s natural and cultural landscapes over the first hundred years of statehood, from 1912 to 2012. Uses newspapers, government publications, novels, poetry, and other sources to examine narratives of the creation of place within a desert environment. Fortey, Richard. The Wood for the Trees: One Man’s Long View of Nature. New York: Knopf, 2016. xii + 304 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. Author explores in detail four acres of woodland in the Chiltern Hills of Oxfordshire, England, over the course of one year. Provides an intricate look at all levels of this environment, plants and wildlife, through four seasons. Also provides a wider story of the ever-changing British landscape over time, discussing centuries of human impact on the countryside and the interactions between flora, fauna, and fungi. Gagliano, Monica, et al., eds. The Language of Plants: Science, Philosophy, Literature. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017. xxxiii + 313 pp. Illustrations, index. A collection of essays from a variety of disciplines examining what kind of “languages” plants use to communicate with each other. Looks at plants within the context of science, philosophy, and literature, revealing a new understanding of vegetal life and how humans interact with the plant world. Griggs, Gary. Coasts in Crisis: A Global Challenge. Oakland: University of California Press, 2017. xiv + 343 pp. Illustrations, maps, figures, index. Provides a comprehensive assessment of human impacts on the coastal zone throughout the world, and how coastal hazards and risks continue to affect human settlement. Looks at human impacts on the coast around the globe such as marine pollution, plastic debris, petroleum pollution, coastal power plants, desalination, fishing, and more. Also details the growing concentrations of populations in already fragile coastal environments. Haskell, David George. The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature’s Great Connectors. New York: Viking, 2017. xi + 292 pp. Bibliography, index. Explores the biological networks of trees and humanity’s place within those networks. Focuses on a dozen different types of trees around the world, looking at their connections to humans, animals, other plants, bacterial communities, fungi, and more. Species examined include redwood, balsam fir, cottonwood, olive, Japanese white pine, hazel, and others. Higgins, Richard. Thoreau and the Language of Trees. Oakland: University of California Press, 2017. xi + 232 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Reveals that trees were central to Henry David Thoreau’s life (1817–62) as well as his work as a naturalist, writer, and thinker. The essays in this volume explore Thoreau’s perceptions of trees and how trees served to connect all aspects of Thoreau’s living heart, mind, and spirit. Features excerpts from Thoreau’s own writings. Johns, Larry C., and Alan R. Johns. The Baneberry Disaster: A Generation of Atomic Fallout. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2017. xiii + 210 pp. Illustrations, figures, notes, index. A study of the December 1970 Baneberry underground nuclear test in Nevada that released a cloud of toxic radiation into the atmosphere. Details the test itself and the impacts on site workers and surrounding communities. Looks at the resulting lawsuits, congressional investigations, and eventual enactment of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act in 1990. Kibler, James Everett Jr., ed. Taking Root: The Nature Writing of William and Adam Summer of Pomaria. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2017. lxxiii + 251 pp. Bibliography, index. Presents the nature writings of William and Adam Summer, two of America’s earliest environmental authors. The Summers founded and ran the influential Pomaria Nursery in South Carolina from the 1840s to the 1870s, providing fruit trees and ornamentals to gardeners throughout the South. They also experimented with sustainable farming, reforestation, and soil regeneration during this time period. Kress, John W., and Jeffrey K. Stine, eds. Living in the Anthropocene: The Earth in the Age of Humans. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Books, 2017. x + 198 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. A collection of essays by authors from various disciplines exploring the Anthropocene, or the Age of Humans, from scientific, social, economic, and environmental points of view. Essays document the spread of agriculture, increases in pollution, urban expansion, scientific responses to these changes, and more. Langston, Nancy. Sustaining Lake Superior: An Extraordinary Lake in a Changing World. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017. xv + 292 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. An environmental and social history of Lake Superior, from the eighteenth through early twenty-first centuries. Details the negative impacts of forest industries, mining, and farming on the lake’s ecosystem, followed by decades of recovery due to community advocacy and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreements. Lee, R. Alton. A New Deal for South Dakota: Drought, Depression, and Relief, 1920–1941. Pierre: South Dakota Historical Society Press, 2016. xii + 269 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. A history of South Dakota during the New Deal era, from 1920 to 1941. Looks at the environmental factors of the state’s economic downturn during this period. Details the built landscape and economic recovery that resulted from New Deal programs such as the Civilian Conservation Corps and the Works Progress Administration including dam and road construction projects. Lora-Wainwright, Anna. Resigned Activism: Living with Pollution in Rural China. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2017. xxxv + 229 pp. Illustrations, maps, tables, notes, bibliography, index. Details the experiences of living with pollution in rural China, and the varying forms of activism that have developed in response over the early twenty-first century. Looks at the devastating impacts of phosphorus mining, fertilizer production, lead and zinc mining, and more. Examines the wide range of local responses to environmental issues such as the protection of safe drinking water in the face of industrialization of rural areas. Lynch, Michael J., et al. Green Criminology: Crime, Justice, and the Environment. Oakland: University of California Press, 2017. xvii + 307 pp. Illustrations, figures, tables, bibliography, index. Textbook focusing on real-world issues of green crime and environmental justice, looking at subjects such as toxic waste, wildlife trafficking, overconsumption, environmental law, and environmental social movements. Includes discussion of historical trends in harmful behaviors that damage ecosystems and impact human populations. Marston, John M. Agricultural Sustainability and Environmental Change at Ancient Gordion. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 2017. xii + 203 pp. Illustrations, figures, maps, tables, bibliography, index. A study of how farmers and herders responded to environmental, social, and economic pressures throughout history in Gordion, in present-day Turkey. Reveals data on nearly three thousand years of agricultural and environmental change in the region, revealing how land use practices affected productive landscapes and local ecologies. Mavhunga, Clapperton Chakanetsa, ed. What Do Science, Technology, and Innovation Mean from Africa? Cambridge: MIT Press, 2017. xiv + 241 pp. Illustrations, figures, bibliography, index. A collection of essays focusing on Africans as intellectual agents in the fields of science, technology, and innovation. Includes examination of indigenous plant knowledge and other environmental topics. Also discusses the trivialization of indigenous knowledge in Africa under European colonialism. Navakas, Michele Currie. Liquid Landscape: Geography and Settlement at the Edge of Early America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018. viii + 235 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. Analyzes the history of Florida’s development over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, looking at how inhabitants responded to the natural environment. Early US settlement strategies in Florida dealt with unique environmental features such as swamps, shifting shorelines, coral reefs, and tiny keys. Reveals crucial stories of American space, place, settlement, and belonging in the absence of stable geography and secure foundations. Ross, Corey. Ecology and Power in the Age of Empire: Europe and the Transformation of the Tropical World. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. x + 477 pp. Illustrations, maps, bibliography, index. An environmental history of European imperialism, looking at the period from the late nineteenth century to the end of the colonial era. Details the growth of tropical commodity production, global trade, and resource management strategies, and how they impacted social, cultural, and political developments in European colonies. Looks at the extraction of commodities such as cotton, cocoa, rubber, copper, oil, and more. Smalley, Andrea L. Wild by Nature: North American Animals Confront Colonization. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017. x + 334 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Argues that European colonists to America attempted to convert indigenous animals to colonized creatures, yet frequently produced negative results that threatened colonial control over the landscape. Details human-animal encounters from the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries, looking at how English settlers attempted to control wild animals without destroying the wilderness and the valuable natural environment. Spencer, Marci. Nantahala National Forest: A History. Charleston: History Press, 2017. 255 pp. Illustrations, bibliography. Provides a detailed history of the Nantahala National Forest, created in 1920 in western North Carolina. Examines the creation of this national forest, the work of rangers, the influential Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, the protection of lakes and rivers, the creation of recreation areas, and more. Tedder, Russell. ForestRails: Georgia-Pacific’s Railroads. Bucklin: White River Productions, 2016. 464 pp. Illustrations, maps, tables. A history of the role played by railroads in the growth of the forest products company Georgia-Pacific. Details the company’s use of railroads over the course of the twentieth century to deliver raw materials as well as finished products. Also looks at how railroads made large areas of timber newly accessible. Provides maps and illustrations documenting Georgia-Pacific railroad lines throughout the United States. Vox, Lisa. Existential Threats: American Apocalyptic Beliefs in the Technological Era. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017. xvi + 266 pp. Notes, bibliography, index. Provides a critical history of the American apocalyptic imagination from the late nineteenth century through the early twenty-first century. Examines religious and secular texts dealing with threats of nuclear war, environmental degradation, declining biodiversity, and more. Argues that American apocalypticism reflects ongoing debates over science, the environment, religion, technology, and America’s role within global politics. Walls, Laura Dassow. Henry David Thoreau : A Life. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017. xx + 615 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. Presents a comprehensive biographical portrait of Henry David Thoreau (1817–62), the nineteenth-century American author, naturalist, political activist, historian, and inventor. Details the many sides of Thoreau, documenting his social activism, his defense of nature, his scientific study, as well as his poetic nature writing. Provides a complete examination of the life and work of this important and influential American. ARTICLES Bailey, Timothy, and Catherine Hooey. “‘From Wasteland to Wonderland’: New Uses for Mined Land in Rural Southeast Kansas.” Midwest Quarterly 58 (Spring 2017): 252–63. Discusses the reuse, or reclamation, of land and landscapes formerly used in surface mining in rural southeastern Kansas from the late 1960s through the early twenty-first century. Includes examination of the history of mining in the region from the 1860s through the 1970s, degradation caused by coal mining, and the revegetation of former mining land. Barker, Stuart. “The Lost Sounds of Nature: The Growing Scarcity of Natural Sounds in the United States.” European Journal of American Culture 36 (March 2017): 57–72. Provides a scholarly examination of the natural soundscapes of the great outdoors in the United States. Discusses historical trends, and how as with other natural resources in the United States, natural sounds, once abundant, have become increasingly scarce due to the pervasiveness of human activity. Bond, David. “Oil in the Caribbean: Refineries, Mangroves, and the Negative Ecologies of Crude Oil.” Comparative Studies in Society and History 59 (July 2017): 600–28. A history of oil refinery construction and coastal oil spills in the Caribbean, focusing on Puerto Rico and St. Croix. Looks at how the oil industry’s destruction of the Caribbean’s mangroves in the Caribbean also opened mangroves up to new forms of knowledge and care. Argues that negative impacts of fossil fuels also instigated new scientific and political appreciations for the liveliness of the natural world. Bryan, William D. “Taming the Wild Side of Bonaventure: Tourism and the Contested Southern Landscape.” Southern Cultures 23 (Summer 2017): 49–74. Looks at the history of Bonaventure Cemetery in Savannah, Georgia, which has grown into a tourist attraction due to its gardens and as the setting of the book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt. Provides insight into the cemetery’s history, competing uses of the landscape, and the role of rural cemeteries in the evolution of American landscape design. Campopiano, Michelle. “Cooperation and Private Enterprise in Water Management in Iraq: Continuity and Change between the Sasanian and Early Islamic Periods (Sixth to Ninth Centuries).” Environment and History 23 (August 2017): 385–407. A study of water management in Late Sasanian and Early Islamic Iraq, between the sixth and tenth centuries. Looks at how the management of water resources depended on interactions between local communities, aristocratic rulers, and the imperial bureaucracy. Details how water management systems allowed for the expansion of irrigated agriculture. Colpitts, George. “Knowing Nature in the Business Records of the Hudson’s Bay Company, 1670–1840.” Business History 59 (October 2017): 1054–80. Looks at the environmental record of British North America provided by the London-based Hudson’s Bay Company from its founding in 1670 through the early nineteenth century. Details the changing quality and flow of environmental information by the company, with an eventual shift in content by the nineteenth century when directors privileged “facts” rather than mere environmental observation. Formia, Elena. “Mediating an Ecological Awareness in Italy: Shared Visions of Sustainability between the Environmental Movement and Radical Design Cultures (1970–1976).” Journal of Design History 30 (May 2017): 192–211. Considers a short period during the 1970s in which the theories and initiatives of the Italian environmental movement intersected with those of design cultures. Looks at how growing environmentalism, left-wing politics, the reception of American counterculture movements, and more, created an ecological awareness and collective consciousness in Italy during this time period. Gergan, Mabel Denzin. “Living with Earthquakes and Angry Deities at the Himalayan Borderlands.” Annals of the American Association of Geographers 107 (March 2017): 490–98. Explores indigenous people’s response to the intersection of concerns around earthquakes and hydropower development in the Indian Himalayan Region. Details how people’s relationship with a sacred animate landscape is not easily translatable into the clear goals of environmental politics. Argues that anxieties over earthquakes are grounded in a longer history of the contested relationship between marginalized peoples and state powers. Goodchild, Hayley. “The Problem of Milk in the Nineteenth-Century Ontario Cheese Industry: An Envirotechnical Approach to Business History.” Business History 59 (October 2017): 1081–1110. Provides a case study for combining environmental and business histories, examining Ontario’s export-oriented cheese industry over the second half of the nineteenth century. Looks at how the reorganization of cheese production from farms to factories in the 1860s increased opportunities for the spoilage and adulteration of milk while also making the detecting and managing of the same more difficult. He, Wenka. “‘Public Interest’ as a Basis for Early Modern State-Society Interactions: Water Control Projects in Qing China, 1750–1850.” Environment and History 23 (August 2017): 455–76. Examines the political process of the state in Qing China between 1720 and 1850 in the area of water and irrigation management. Looks at how collusion between local gentry and government officials over hydraulic projects often sacrificed the public interest, and initiated conflicts between upstream and downstream populations as well as between commercial transportation interests and local irrigation needs. Hedberg, David-Paul B. “Seeing Portland’s Urban Forest for Its History.” Western Historical Quarterly 47 (November 2016): 463–70. Discusses the history of Portland, Oregon, by focusing on the history of the city’s trees arising from the public history project “Portland’s Heritage Tree Program.” Looks at topics such as the city’s codes related to heritage trees, trees in historic images of the city, the work of nineteenth-century social reformer and gardener Rosetta Burrell, and the history of the native Oregon white oak on Overton Street that predates the city’s settlement. Johnson, Nick. “Workers’ Weed: Cannabis, Sugar Beets, and Landscapes of Labor in the American West, 1900–1946.” Agricultural History 91 (Summer 2017): 320–41. Examines interactions between Mexican American farm works, the cannabis plant, and the agricultural landscape of the American West during the first half of the twentieth century. Looks at how farm workers used traditional knowledge of cannabis to illegally supplement their income and attempt to better their standing at the bottom of the region’s socioeconomic ladder. Jones, Karen. “The Story of Comanche: Horsepower, Heroism and the Conquest of the American West.” War and Society 36 (August 2017): 156–81. Examines the famous cavalry horse, Comanche, as a way to explore the history of warhorses in the military culture of the American West, as well as to point toward a growing scholarship on war and the environment that emphasizes the usefulness of such themes as interspecies exchange. Comanche succumbed to colic in 1891 at a critical moment in the history of the American Western frontier. Labrague, Michelle. “Patagonia, A Case Study in the Historical Development of Slow Thinking.” Journal of Design History 30 (May 2017): 175–91. As fashion and design history expands to incorporate environmental history, this article presents a historical case study of the material culture of the American activewear brand Patagonia. Looks at how the brand’s catalogs have historically highlighted some of the tensions between the differing schools of ecological thought and the problems presented by applying those values to design and sportswear practice. Lepofsky, Dana, et al. “Historical Ecology of Cultural Keystone Places of the Northwest Coast.” American Anthropologist 119 (September 2017): 448–63. Documents the history of three cultural keystone places in coastal British Columbia, Canada: Hauyat, Laxgalts’ap (Old Town), and Dałk Gyilakyaw (Robin Town). Looks at how the traditional lands of indigenous peoples serve as archives of their histories, also revealing unique insights into the history of human-environmental interactions. Meyer, Judith. “Yellowstone’s Howard Eaton Trail.” Western Historical Quarterly 48 (Summer 2017): 191–95. Looks at the significance of the Howard Eaton Trail to the cultural and physical landscape of Yellowstone National Park. Also examines the work of guide Howard Eaton, for whom the trail was named and dedicated in 1923, as well as attempting to discern whether Eaton actually scouted the route of the trail. Morgan, John Emry. “The Micro-Politics of Water Management in Early Modern England: Regulation and Representation in Commissions of Sewers.” Environment and History 23 (August 2017): 409–30. Analyzes the social and political history of water management in southwest and eastern England during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Looks at the rise and decline of public influence over water management through the Commissions of Sewers and popular knowledge over local drainage networks and flood defense systems. Eventually the agency of local stakeholders was removed from the process, limiting an element of immediate ecological responsiveness. Newton, Jason L. “‘These French Canadian of the Woods Are Half-Wild Folk’: Wilderness, Whiteness, and Work in North America, 1840–1955.” Labour/Le Travail 77 (Spring 2016): 121–50. Discusses ideas of race, wilderness, and work, looking at how these subjects relate to the immigration of French Canadian loggers to the United States between 1840 and 1955. Reveals insights into how North Americans of this time period connected ideals about race with the realities of industrial work, for example the supposed French Canadian affinity for logging work. Nisbet, James. “Environmental Abstraction and the Polluted Image.” American Art 31 (Spring 2017): 114–31. Examines the history of art, environmental abstraction, and pollution in American history, with a focus on the work of artists such as J. M. W. Turner, Edward Burtynsky, and Bruce Nauman. Also looks at conceptual art depictions of pollution and smog in Los Angeles, California, during the twentieth century. Nisha, P. R. “Ban and Benevolence: Circus, Animals and Indian State.” Indian Economic and Social History Review 54 (April-June 2017): 239–66. Explores the legal battle surrounding the ban on the training and performance of certain wild animals by the Ministry of Environment and Forests in India in 1991. Provides discourses on wild and captive animals, circuses and the history of animal training, and the ideas of rescue, rehabilitation, and conservation. Also discusses the history of hunting and wildlife policies of the colonial and postcolonial states in India. Nobbs-Thiessen, Ben. “Cheese Is Culture and Soy Is Commodity: Environmental Change in a Bolivian Mennonite Colony.” Journal of Mennonite Studies 35 (2017): 303–28. Discusses the history of the dairy and soy industry in a Bolivian Mennonite colony over the late twentieth century. Includes examination of the environmental history of Mennonite farming practices in Bolivia, food security and export agriculture in the region, and transplanting milk production from Mexico to Bolivia. Ore, Kathryn Sears. “Form and Substance: The National Historic Preservation Act, Badger-Two Medicine, and Meaningful Consultation.” Public Land and Resources Law Review 38 (2017): 205–44. Provides a study of meaningful consultation between federal agencies and an American Indian tribe, focused around Badger-Two Medicine, a cultural landscape along the border of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Glacier National Park, and the Bob Marshall Wilderness in Montana. Discusses the history of the National Historic Preservation Act and how collaborations with Native Americans under the act have operated. Oteng-Ababio, Martin, et al. “Landfill Externalities and Property Values Dilemma: Emerging Insights from Three Ghanaian Cities.” Journal of Contemporary African Studies 35 (July 2017): 349–69. A study of the negative impacts that landfills exert on land and property values in developing countries, using a case study of three cities in Ghana. Looks at landfills in these communities over the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, arguing that most engineered landfills in the country serve as a catalyst in correcting the ills of uncontrolled urbanization. Patrick, Andrew P. “Birth of the Bluegrass: Ecological Transformations in Central Kentucky to 1810.” Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 115 (Spring 2017): 155–82. Details the ecological transformations in the history of central Kentucky from 1000 through 1810, focusing on the birth of bluegrass, the role of human influences on ecological developments, and the emergence of modern environmentalism. Reid, Mark Collin. “Timber!” Canada’s History 97 (October/November 2017): 20–23. Provides an overview of the history of logging and forestry in Canada, focusing on the equipment used, production methods, and cultural aspects. Includes discussion of the poll axe and broad axe used by early lumberjacks, as well as women who worked jobs in forest industries during World War II. Smith-Howard, Kendra. “Healing Animals in an Antibiotic Age: Veterinary Drugs and the Professionalism Crisis, 1945–1970.” Technology and Culture 58 (July 2017): 722–48. Discusses the impacts of the introduction of antibiotics in agriculture between 1945 and 1970. Looks at debates over farmers increasingly taking over animal healing without veterinary supervision, as well as the increased reliance on antibiotics in the postwar era, growing bacterial resistance, and federal agricultural regulations. Spears, Ellen Griffith. “(Re)Writing Histories of Environmentalism in Alabama.” Alabama Review 70 (April 2017): 171–88. Argues for the need for greater scholarly attention to southern landscapes in environmental history, focusing on the history of environmentalism in Alabama. Documents the US South as the location of far more environmental activism than has been acknowledged, despite the region’s hospitality to polluting industries and resistance by southern legislatures to passing strong environmental laws. Sylvester, Kenneth M., and Paul W. Rhode. “Making Green Revolutions: Kansas Farms, Recovery, and the New Agriculture, 1918–1981.” Agricultural History 91 (Summer 2017): 342–68. Uses farm-level survey data from the Kansas State Board of Agriculture that provides a detailed record of residential and land use histories of rural communities over the course of the twentieth century. Provides insight into how farm households in Kansas responded to the drought years of the dust bowl era and adjusted into a period of recovery and growth following World War II. Tielhof, Milja Van. “Regional Planning in a Decentralized State: How Administrative Practices Contributed to Consensus-Building in Sixteenth-Century Holland.” Environment and History 23 (August 2017): 431–53. Provides a history of regional water management under the imperial Habsburg government in sixteenth-century Holland. Details the collection of local-level information on drainage schemes and how this influenced the ongoing state formation process. Wilson, Richa. “Building the Forest Service in Utah: An Architectural Context.” Utah Historical Quarterly 85 (Winter 2017): 40–58. A history of the construction of permanent buildings by the US Forest Service in Utah, focusing on the first half of the twentieth century. Looks at the work of early rangers in constructing cabins and dwellings, the implementation of design standards and construction manuals, and the importance of facility construction to recreational growth on US public lands. DISSERTATIONS AND THESES Beer, Clare Marie. “Enclosing Ecology? Land Conservation and Environmental Statecraft in Chile.” Master’s thesis, University of California, Los Angeles, 2017. 123 pp. Examines the rise of private protected areas in Chile and their relationship to the state’s public protected areas network. Draws on archival and historical evidence to argue that land conservation and protection in Chile is aimed at reproducing state interests as much as, if not more than, advancing environmental and biodiversity outcomes. Carlson Dietmeier, Jenna Kay. “Beyond the Butcher’s Block: The Animal Landscapes of Eighteenth-Century Chesapeake and Lowcountry Plantations.” PhD dissertation, College of William and Mary, 2017. 453 pp. Argues that working oxen, horses, and mules contributed to the physical and social landscapes of eighteenth-century plantations in the Chesapeake and the Lowcountry regions of Virginia and South Carolina. In both regions, interactions between humans and animals combined with the physicality of the plantations to create landscapes of domination and resistance. Dolbee, Samuel. “The Locust and the Starling: People, Insects, and Disease in the Late Ottoman Jazira and After, 1860–1940.” PhD dissertation, New York University, 2017. 413 pp. A study reconstructing the environmental history of the Jazira, the steppe region between the Euphrates and the Tigris at the foot of the Anatolian Plateau, between 1860 and 1940. Argues that new state borders during this time period gave power to locusts, nomads, and cholera because they were able to move in ways that state officials could not. Gettig, Eric T. “Oil and Revolution in Cuba: Development, Nationalism, and the U.S. Energy Empire, 1902–1961.” PhD dissertation, Georgetown University, 2017. 654 pp. Using approaches from environmental, economic, diplomatic, and cultural history, this study looks at how oil and energy sources shaped Cuban nationalism and relations with the United States between 1902 and 1961. Reveals how Cubans equated modernity with rising energy consumption and viewed oil in nationalist terms, believing that nature had endowed the island with great, but unfulfilled, promise as an oil producer. Herring, Kalila. “Seeing the Forest and the Trees: Tracing Fuel Use and Landscape Change on the Eastern Pequot Reservation 1740–1850.” Master’s thesis, University of Massachusetts, Boston, 2017. 163 pp. Looks at fuelwood use by the Eastern Pequot, a Native American nation in Connecticut, during a time of regional deforestation and an altering landscape due to rapidly expanding agriculture. Also looks at how this population, living on a reservation in a colonial environment, dealt with timber theft, a reduced land base, overseer control, and the overall environmental changes of this time period. Newton, Jason L. “Forging Titans: The Rise of Industrial Capitalism in the Northern Forest, 1850–1950.” PhD dissertation, Syracuse University, 2017. 571 pp. Looks at the labor and environmental history of the lumber industry in the US Northeast, describing the historical processes that made rural laborers into a coherent class of wage-working lumberjacks and how this class became an iconic symbol of masculinity in twentieth-century America. Argues that because lumberjacks were seen as part of nature, they became masculine icons for self-diagnosed overcivilized urban corporate elites who were looking outside the city for examples of natural masculinity. Song, Sikang. “Building a Smoking Society: Culture and Ecology of the Tobacco Industry in North China, 1902–1937.” PhD dissertation, Washington State University, 2017. 272 pp. Details how beginning in 1902 the British-American Tobacco Company began its business expansion in China by mass-marketing machine-rolled cigarettes to Chinese consumers, monopolizing the market and transforming Chinese tobacco production and consumption toward cigarettes. This new commodity chain left significant environmental impacts on Chinese agriculture as the tobacco cultivation and peasants’ livelihood in North China were linked to the globalizing industrial economy. Williams, Bryon P. “Race, Retreat, and Refuge: Black Voices, American Nature Writing, and Ecocritical Exile.” PhD dissertation, Duquesne University, 2017. 209 pp. Examines the absence of nineteenth-century black-authored environmental writing in modern studies and anthologies. Argues that contemporary racially aligned divides and gaps in environmental discourse have roots in the 1840s and 1850s when the nature-writing genre coalesced into its most enduring form in the works of Henry David Thoreau. Also reveals that there do exist published works from the mid-nineteenth century that include numerous first-person accounts of black eco-actors in intensive relationship with the natural environment, but that these narratives have been rendered invisible as nature writing. Zhang, Meng. “Timber Trade along the Yangzi River: Market, Institutions, and Environment, 1750–1911.” PhD dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles, 2017. 368 pp. Studies the history of the long-distance timber trade along China’s Yangzi River during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Demonstrates how this voluminous trade was an important aspect of the economic, environmental, and frontier history of Qing China. Looks at the local population’s active participation in both the timber trade and tree planting. ARCHIVAL SOURCES New Haven Museum & Historical Society Library 114 Whitney Avenue New Haven, CT 06510 Alderman, Nancy O. 1978–2006 3 boxes Nancy O. Alderman Papers This collection contains material collected during Nancy O. Alderman’s involvement in various environmental organizations in the New Haven, Connecticut, area, including newspaper clippings, newsletters, correspondence, and transcripts of talks. J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah Special Collections 295 South 1500 East Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0860 Black, James Bruce 1992–1994 0.25 linear feet Bruce James Black Papers Bruce James Black (b. 1954) went to Germany on a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) from 1974 to 1976. He then attended the University of Utah and graduated cum laude in 1979 with a BA in art history and a BA in German. Black wrote, “A Chronological History of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 1966–1976.” The Bruce James Black papers (1992–94) contain a copy of “ A Chronological History of Environmental Movement in Utah,” as well as research notes, articles, and chronologies. Black served an LDS mission to Germany and graduated from the University of Utah in 1979. Central Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan University Archives Harden Learning Resources Center 126 1401 Presque Isle Avenue Marquette, MI 49855 Cantrill, James G. (James Gerard) 1980–2007 4.0 cubic feet James G. Cantrill Papers James G. Cantrill received his PhD in speech communication from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1985. He currently serves as professor and head of the Department of Communications and Performance Studies at Northern Michigan University (NMU). He began his appointment at NMU in 1990. Cantrill’s area of expertise and related scholarship is in environmental communication. He is a consultant for the US Environmental Protection Agency and Parks Canada, among other organizations. His research record has helped him earn external grants from such agencies as the US Forest Service, the Great Lakes National Program Office, and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. Since coming to NMU in 1990, Cantrill has written or co-edited numerous books, journal articles, and technical papers. He often involves NMU students in his publications and presentations. This collection documents James Cantrill’s administrative, professional, and curricular activities, mostly at NMU in Marquette, Michigan. Records include studies, committee material, conference material, First Year Experience, and course files from 1980 to 2007. University of Southern California USC Libraries Special Collections Doheny Memorial Library 206 3550 Trousdale Parkway Los Angeles, CA 90089-0189 Citizens Committee to Save Elysian Park 1965–2008 11.0 linear feet; 11 boxes Citizens Committee to Save Elysian Park Records The Citizens Committee to Save Elysian Park was founded in 1965 to organize public and official awareness and to raise support to preserve the park land as public open space and develop it for recreational activities. Elysian Park is Los Angeles’s first and oldest park. The mission and efforts of this vibrant grassroots organization are ongoing, and the committee will continue to add materials that document its activities. This collection consists of nine boxes of records dating back to the committee’s early history in the 1960s. It was donated by the 2004 board of directors of the committee. University of California, Riverside Rivera Library, Special Collections Department P.O. Box 5900 University of California Riverside, CA 92517-5900 Citrus Research Center and Agricultural Experiment Station 1808–2007 63.0 linear feet University of California, Riverside, Citrus Research Center and Agricultural Experiment Station Records The Citrus Research Center and Agricultural Experiment Station (CRC-AES) was established by the regents of the University of California (UC) on February 14, 1907. In the late 1800s, the citrus industry was quickly expanding in Southern California, so a research facility was needed closer than the state Agricultural Experiment Station located in Berkeley. In 1899 John Henry Reed, a citrus grower and member of the Riverside Horticultural Club, developed a proposal for the construction of an experiment station in Riverside for the purpose of improving the growth and production of citrus crops. Over the next five years, Reed and his fellow club members created petitions, acquired endorsements, and lobbied the California legislature to have a station developed. In May 1906, a group of commissioners was created to represent the UC regents and approved a plan that would allow for the establishment of an organization with two separate branches: a laboratory in Whittier and an experiment station in Riverside. The CRC-AES records collection contains administrative records, correspondence, faculty papers, publications, scrapbooks, clippings, photographs, reports, project files, and other relevant material. Formerly known as the Citrus Experiment Station (CES), the bulk of materials precede the establishment of UC Riverside’s College of Letters and Sciences in 1954. The majority of topics document the history, events, faculty, staff, facilities, research, and experiments of CES. Materials related to CES research and experiments pertain to the physiology and morphology of citrus, fig, date palm, avocado, and other subtropical crops, soil management, smog studies, pest control, and diseases. Most citrus-related publications and faculty papers were originally part of the former UC Graduate School of Tropical Agriculture and Citrus Experiment Station Library. Project files pertain to research and experiments conducted by CES staff, faculty, and associated members. In addition, other subjects include the history of the citrus and avocado industry in Southern California, the introduction of the first Washington navel orange tree, and global production and marketing of citrus and subtropical agriculture. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Southern Historical Collection Wilson Library Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Colton, Marie Watters 1978–1994 14 items; 3.0 linear feet Marie Watters Colton Scrapbooks and Audiocassette Marie Watters Colton of Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina, represented the 51st district in the North Carolina House of Representatives (1978–94). A University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill graduate, Colton married Henry E. Colton. The couple lived first in Chapel Hill and later in Asheville. After her husband, an Asheville City councilman, declined to run for state office, Marie Colton campaigned for and won the seat. Colton, a Democrat, was the first female speaker pro tempore of the House, serving in that role from 1991 to 1994. In recognition of her advocacy of women and children’s issues, Colton was appointed to the UN Commission on the Status of Women in 1994. The collection includes scrapbooks related to Marie Colton’s activities in the North Carolina General Assembly (1978–94). Scrapbooks contain newspaper clippings, photographs, letters from constituents and lobbyists, notes from government officials, and other materials. Topics include corporal punishment, conservation and environmentalism, billboards, alternative medicine, tax reform, historic preservation, tourism and economic development in western North Carolina, child welfare protection, domestic violence laws, and legislative ethics reform. Newspaper clippings detail Colton’s promotion of stronger sedimentation laws, years of fighting to allow local school boards to ban corporal punishment, handling of the state budget crisis in 1991, reelection campaigns, and efforts to ban highway billboard signs. Scattered throughout are legislative directories and notes on legislative sessions that demonstrate her wit and sense of humor. Also included is an audiocassette containing Colton’s 1990 speaker pro tempore acceptance speech. University of Massachusetts at Amherst Special Collections and University Archives, 154 Hicks Way Amherst, MA 01003-9275 Friends of Tully Lake 1976–2008 1 box; 0.5 linear feet Friends of Tully Lake records In October 2003, a group of residents from the North Quabbin region in Massachusetts came together to oppose plans to develop a large tract overlooking the southeast shore of Tully Lake. Concerned about the environmental and social impact of the proposed development and asserting the rights of the towns and residents affected to have a say, the Friends of Tully Lake waged a five-year campaign that ultimately succeeded in convincing the Planning Board in the town of Athol to reject the proposal. The records of the Friends of Tully Lake document a successful grassroots initiative to prevent private development on a lake in the North Quabbin region. Maintained by Aaron Ellison and Elizabeth Farnsworth, leaders in the organization, the collection includes notes and minutes of the meetings, communication with environmental consultants, exchanges with the Athol Planning Board, and some background information environmental regulations in Massachusetts. Forest History Society 701 William Vickers Avenue Durham, NC 27701 Klahn, Austin E. 1940–1989 3.5 linear feet Austin E. Klahn Papers Austin Elwood Klahn (1917–2016) worked for the US Forest Service and Army Soil Conservation Service in Texas, Oregon, and Washington, with a significant portion of his career spent on the Okanogan National Forest in Washington. This collection contains paperwork related to Austin Klahn’s time working with the US Forest Service and Army Soil Conservation Service including photographs, personnel records, and maps. Also included in the collection are US Forest Service uniforms, pins, hard hats, signage, and other items as well as a metal toy of Smokey Bear in a jeep from the 1960s. University of California, Los Angeles Department of Special Collections Charles E. Young Research Library, Box 951575 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1575 Lillard, Richard Gordon 1940–1988 185 boxes; 92.5 linear feet; 2 oversize boxes Richard Gordon Lillard Papers Richard Gordon Lillard (1909–90) was an English professor and author. He taught at Los Angeles City College (1933–34, 1935–42, and 1962–65), Indiana University (1943–47), UCLA (1947–65), and California State University, Los Angeles (1965–1974). In 1948 he won the Silver Medal of the Commonwealth Club of California for The Great Forest (1947). His other publications include Desert Challenge: An Interpretation of Nevada (1942) and Eden in Jeopardy (1966). This collection consists primarily of Richard Lillard’s manuscripts and notes for articles and unpublished work but also contains personal items and materials related to his academic career. University of New Mexico, Center for Southwest Research. Zimmerman Library Albuquerque, NM 87131-1466 Sam Hitt Forest Guardians 1988–2003 3 boxes; 3 cubic feet Sam Hitt Forest Guardians Collection Forest Guardians is a nonprofit environmental group that focuses on the Southwest of the United States. Forest Guardians was founded in 1989 under the direction of Sam Hitt. Forest Guardians’ website describes the organization as a results-driven group that attempts to defend and preserve threatened southwestern wildlife and ecosystems (including the American Southwest and northern Mexico). Their approach to conservation combines scientific analysis with strategic litigation in an effort to enforce existing environmental laws and reform public policies. The larger goal of the organization is to protect and restore native southwestern biological diversity and watersheds. Forest Guardians is committed to public education and enlisting citizen support for the protection of the Southwest; advocating for biological conservation; enforcing and strengthening environmental laws; assisting communities in efforts to protect land; and advocating for sustainable use of natural resources. This collection contains Sam Hitt’s personal collection of Forest Guardians records. Forest Guardians was an environmental organization based in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The collection details research, politics, and advocacy pertaining to various environmental topics. University of Illinois at Springfield, Archives Norris L. Brookens Library University of Illinois at Springfield One University Plaza Springfield, IL 62703 Saratoga County 1988–1995 1 folder ILSR Recycling Archives, Saratoga County Recycling Collection A collection of materials related to recycling projects in Saratoga County, New York, during the late 1980s and 1990s, providing historical background on the recycling movement and its implementation in the county. Includes newspaper clippings, email correspondence, and a brochure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Environmental History and the Forest History Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental History Oxford University Press

New Scholarship

Environmental History , Volume 23 (1) – Jan 1, 2018

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Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Environmental History and the Forest History Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1084-5453
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1930-8892
D.O.I.
10.1093/envhis/emx127
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Abstract

THE FOREST HISTORY SOCIETY (FHS) maintains an extensive database of published sources related to environmental history. The “new scholarship” section of this journal includes just a selection of the new information that the FHS library adds each quarter. The library indexes all entries in the database by topic, chronological period, and geographic area. The library staff will gladly provide additional information about items you see in this section or information on other topics from the database. They are happy to respond to requests for full bibliographies or lists of archival collections for specific research projects. The unabridged version of this New Scholarship section is searchable as part of the research databases on our website at www.foresthistory.org. The compiler also welcomes information about relevant publications that the staff may have missed, including books, theses, and dissertations. The compiler particularly welcomes copies of relevant articles. Contact us by mail at New Scholarship, Forest History Society, 701 William Vickers Ave., Durham, NC 27701, USA, by telephone at 919-682-9319, or by email: library@foresthistory.org BOOKS Bekele, Getnet. Ploughing New Ground: Food, Farming and Environmental Change in Ethiopia. Woodbridge: James Currey, 2017. xv + 207 pp. Maps, tables, bibliography, index. Presents a history of agrarian politics and environmental change and transformation in the lake region of Ethiopia from the late nineteenth to early twenty-first centuries. Details the politics of food supply, the impacts of foreign investment, ongoing agricultural development, and how they influenced small farmers and local populations in the lake region over this time period. Buckley, Eve E. Technocrats and the Politics of Drought and Development in Twentieth-Century Brazil. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2017. xiv + 279 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. Details how technology and water engineering were used as instruments of reform and economic development in twentieth-century Brazil. Looks at how dam construction, irrigation projects, and public health initiatives were implemented to solve a drought crisis and end poverty yet led to unexpected environmental consequences. Clifford, Jim. West Ham and the River Lea: A Social and Environmental History of London’s Industrialized Marshland, 1839–1914. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2017. xxiii + 214 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. An environmental and social history of the East London suburb of West Ham and the Lower Lea Valley from 1839 to 1914. Looks at the industrialization of this marshland ecosystem, and the impacts of poverty, pollution, water shortages, and disease on the area’s population. Examines how environmental conditions in West Ham during this time period influenced urban policies for London as a whole. Corona, Gabriella. A Short Environmental History of Italy: Variety and Vulnerability. Winwick: White Horse Press, 2017. 147 pp. Illustrations, maps, bibliography, index. An overview of the environmental history of Italy, focused on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Details the use of natural resources and the associated environmental and social consequences, as well as the many forces that have helped shape the Italian landscape over this time period. The book is divided into four sections, corresponding with pivotal moments in modern Italian history. Corona, Gabriella. Venomous Encounters: Snakes, Vivisection and Scientific Medicine in Colonial Australia. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2017. xiii + 202 pp. Illustrations, bibliography, index. A history of the treatment of snakes in colonial Australia between 1788 and World War I. Details the study of snakes, the adoption of vivisection (experiments on living animals), and the use of snake bites or venom injections on dogs, pigs, and cattle during this time period. Dilsaver, Lary M. Preserving the Desert: A History of Joshua Tree National Park. Staunton: George F. Thompson, 2016. 472 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. A detailed history of Joshua Tree National Park, located in the desert of Southern California. Looks at the area’s establishment as a national monument in the 1930s and its designation as a national park in 1994. Examines the work done over the twentieth century to manage and protect this unique desert ecosystem. Engel-Pearson, Kim. Writing Arizona, 1912–2012: A Cultural and Environmental Chronicle. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2017. xi + 292 pp. Notes, bibliography, index. Provides analysis of written sources documenting the evolution of Arizona’s natural and cultural landscapes over the first hundred years of statehood, from 1912 to 2012. Uses newspapers, government publications, novels, poetry, and other sources to examine narratives of the creation of place within a desert environment. Fortey, Richard. The Wood for the Trees: One Man’s Long View of Nature. New York: Knopf, 2016. xii + 304 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. Author explores in detail four acres of woodland in the Chiltern Hills of Oxfordshire, England, over the course of one year. Provides an intricate look at all levels of this environment, plants and wildlife, through four seasons. Also provides a wider story of the ever-changing British landscape over time, discussing centuries of human impact on the countryside and the interactions between flora, fauna, and fungi. Gagliano, Monica, et al., eds. The Language of Plants: Science, Philosophy, Literature. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017. xxxiii + 313 pp. Illustrations, index. A collection of essays from a variety of disciplines examining what kind of “languages” plants use to communicate with each other. Looks at plants within the context of science, philosophy, and literature, revealing a new understanding of vegetal life and how humans interact with the plant world. Griggs, Gary. Coasts in Crisis: A Global Challenge. Oakland: University of California Press, 2017. xiv + 343 pp. Illustrations, maps, figures, index. Provides a comprehensive assessment of human impacts on the coastal zone throughout the world, and how coastal hazards and risks continue to affect human settlement. Looks at human impacts on the coast around the globe such as marine pollution, plastic debris, petroleum pollution, coastal power plants, desalination, fishing, and more. Also details the growing concentrations of populations in already fragile coastal environments. Haskell, David George. The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature’s Great Connectors. New York: Viking, 2017. xi + 292 pp. Bibliography, index. Explores the biological networks of trees and humanity’s place within those networks. Focuses on a dozen different types of trees around the world, looking at their connections to humans, animals, other plants, bacterial communities, fungi, and more. Species examined include redwood, balsam fir, cottonwood, olive, Japanese white pine, hazel, and others. Higgins, Richard. Thoreau and the Language of Trees. Oakland: University of California Press, 2017. xi + 232 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Reveals that trees were central to Henry David Thoreau’s life (1817–62) as well as his work as a naturalist, writer, and thinker. The essays in this volume explore Thoreau’s perceptions of trees and how trees served to connect all aspects of Thoreau’s living heart, mind, and spirit. Features excerpts from Thoreau’s own writings. Johns, Larry C., and Alan R. Johns. The Baneberry Disaster: A Generation of Atomic Fallout. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2017. xiii + 210 pp. Illustrations, figures, notes, index. A study of the December 1970 Baneberry underground nuclear test in Nevada that released a cloud of toxic radiation into the atmosphere. Details the test itself and the impacts on site workers and surrounding communities. Looks at the resulting lawsuits, congressional investigations, and eventual enactment of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act in 1990. Kibler, James Everett Jr., ed. Taking Root: The Nature Writing of William and Adam Summer of Pomaria. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2017. lxxiii + 251 pp. Bibliography, index. Presents the nature writings of William and Adam Summer, two of America’s earliest environmental authors. The Summers founded and ran the influential Pomaria Nursery in South Carolina from the 1840s to the 1870s, providing fruit trees and ornamentals to gardeners throughout the South. They also experimented with sustainable farming, reforestation, and soil regeneration during this time period. Kress, John W., and Jeffrey K. Stine, eds. Living in the Anthropocene: The Earth in the Age of Humans. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Books, 2017. x + 198 pp. Illustrations, notes, index. A collection of essays by authors from various disciplines exploring the Anthropocene, or the Age of Humans, from scientific, social, economic, and environmental points of view. Essays document the spread of agriculture, increases in pollution, urban expansion, scientific responses to these changes, and more. Langston, Nancy. Sustaining Lake Superior: An Extraordinary Lake in a Changing World. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017. xv + 292 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, index. An environmental and social history of Lake Superior, from the eighteenth through early twenty-first centuries. Details the negative impacts of forest industries, mining, and farming on the lake’s ecosystem, followed by decades of recovery due to community advocacy and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreements. Lee, R. Alton. A New Deal for South Dakota: Drought, Depression, and Relief, 1920–1941. Pierre: South Dakota Historical Society Press, 2016. xii + 269 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. A history of South Dakota during the New Deal era, from 1920 to 1941. Looks at the environmental factors of the state’s economic downturn during this period. Details the built landscape and economic recovery that resulted from New Deal programs such as the Civilian Conservation Corps and the Works Progress Administration including dam and road construction projects. Lora-Wainwright, Anna. Resigned Activism: Living with Pollution in Rural China. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2017. xxxv + 229 pp. Illustrations, maps, tables, notes, bibliography, index. Details the experiences of living with pollution in rural China, and the varying forms of activism that have developed in response over the early twenty-first century. Looks at the devastating impacts of phosphorus mining, fertilizer production, lead and zinc mining, and more. Examines the wide range of local responses to environmental issues such as the protection of safe drinking water in the face of industrialization of rural areas. Lynch, Michael J., et al. Green Criminology: Crime, Justice, and the Environment. Oakland: University of California Press, 2017. xvii + 307 pp. Illustrations, figures, tables, bibliography, index. Textbook focusing on real-world issues of green crime and environmental justice, looking at subjects such as toxic waste, wildlife trafficking, overconsumption, environmental law, and environmental social movements. Includes discussion of historical trends in harmful behaviors that damage ecosystems and impact human populations. Marston, John M. Agricultural Sustainability and Environmental Change at Ancient Gordion. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 2017. xii + 203 pp. Illustrations, figures, maps, tables, bibliography, index. A study of how farmers and herders responded to environmental, social, and economic pressures throughout history in Gordion, in present-day Turkey. Reveals data on nearly three thousand years of agricultural and environmental change in the region, revealing how land use practices affected productive landscapes and local ecologies. Mavhunga, Clapperton Chakanetsa, ed. What Do Science, Technology, and Innovation Mean from Africa? Cambridge: MIT Press, 2017. xiv + 241 pp. Illustrations, figures, bibliography, index. A collection of essays focusing on Africans as intellectual agents in the fields of science, technology, and innovation. Includes examination of indigenous plant knowledge and other environmental topics. Also discusses the trivialization of indigenous knowledge in Africa under European colonialism. Navakas, Michele Currie. Liquid Landscape: Geography and Settlement at the Edge of Early America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018. viii + 235 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. Analyzes the history of Florida’s development over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, looking at how inhabitants responded to the natural environment. Early US settlement strategies in Florida dealt with unique environmental features such as swamps, shifting shorelines, coral reefs, and tiny keys. Reveals crucial stories of American space, place, settlement, and belonging in the absence of stable geography and secure foundations. Ross, Corey. Ecology and Power in the Age of Empire: Europe and the Transformation of the Tropical World. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. x + 477 pp. Illustrations, maps, bibliography, index. An environmental history of European imperialism, looking at the period from the late nineteenth century to the end of the colonial era. Details the growth of tropical commodity production, global trade, and resource management strategies, and how they impacted social, cultural, and political developments in European colonies. Looks at the extraction of commodities such as cotton, cocoa, rubber, copper, oil, and more. Smalley, Andrea L. Wild by Nature: North American Animals Confront Colonization. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017. x + 334 pp. Illustrations, notes, bibliography, index. Argues that European colonists to America attempted to convert indigenous animals to colonized creatures, yet frequently produced negative results that threatened colonial control over the landscape. Details human-animal encounters from the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries, looking at how English settlers attempted to control wild animals without destroying the wilderness and the valuable natural environment. Spencer, Marci. Nantahala National Forest: A History. Charleston: History Press, 2017. 255 pp. Illustrations, bibliography. Provides a detailed history of the Nantahala National Forest, created in 1920 in western North Carolina. Examines the creation of this national forest, the work of rangers, the influential Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, the protection of lakes and rivers, the creation of recreation areas, and more. Tedder, Russell. ForestRails: Georgia-Pacific’s Railroads. Bucklin: White River Productions, 2016. 464 pp. Illustrations, maps, tables. A history of the role played by railroads in the growth of the forest products company Georgia-Pacific. Details the company’s use of railroads over the course of the twentieth century to deliver raw materials as well as finished products. Also looks at how railroads made large areas of timber newly accessible. Provides maps and illustrations documenting Georgia-Pacific railroad lines throughout the United States. Vox, Lisa. Existential Threats: American Apocalyptic Beliefs in the Technological Era. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017. xvi + 266 pp. Notes, bibliography, index. Provides a critical history of the American apocalyptic imagination from the late nineteenth century through the early twenty-first century. Examines religious and secular texts dealing with threats of nuclear war, environmental degradation, declining biodiversity, and more. Argues that American apocalypticism reflects ongoing debates over science, the environment, religion, technology, and America’s role within global politics. Walls, Laura Dassow. Henry David Thoreau : A Life. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017. xx + 615 pp. Illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. Presents a comprehensive biographical portrait of Henry David Thoreau (1817–62), the nineteenth-century American author, naturalist, political activist, historian, and inventor. Details the many sides of Thoreau, documenting his social activism, his defense of nature, his scientific study, as well as his poetic nature writing. Provides a complete examination of the life and work of this important and influential American. ARTICLES Bailey, Timothy, and Catherine Hooey. “‘From Wasteland to Wonderland’: New Uses for Mined Land in Rural Southeast Kansas.” Midwest Quarterly 58 (Spring 2017): 252–63. Discusses the reuse, or reclamation, of land and landscapes formerly used in surface mining in rural southeastern Kansas from the late 1960s through the early twenty-first century. Includes examination of the history of mining in the region from the 1860s through the 1970s, degradation caused by coal mining, and the revegetation of former mining land. Barker, Stuart. “The Lost Sounds of Nature: The Growing Scarcity of Natural Sounds in the United States.” European Journal of American Culture 36 (March 2017): 57–72. Provides a scholarly examination of the natural soundscapes of the great outdoors in the United States. Discusses historical trends, and how as with other natural resources in the United States, natural sounds, once abundant, have become increasingly scarce due to the pervasiveness of human activity. Bond, David. “Oil in the Caribbean: Refineries, Mangroves, and the Negative Ecologies of Crude Oil.” Comparative Studies in Society and History 59 (July 2017): 600–28. A history of oil refinery construction and coastal oil spills in the Caribbean, focusing on Puerto Rico and St. Croix. Looks at how the oil industry’s destruction of the Caribbean’s mangroves in the Caribbean also opened mangroves up to new forms of knowledge and care. Argues that negative impacts of fossil fuels also instigated new scientific and political appreciations for the liveliness of the natural world. Bryan, William D. “Taming the Wild Side of Bonaventure: Tourism and the Contested Southern Landscape.” Southern Cultures 23 (Summer 2017): 49–74. Looks at the history of Bonaventure Cemetery in Savannah, Georgia, which has grown into a tourist attraction due to its gardens and as the setting of the book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt. Provides insight into the cemetery’s history, competing uses of the landscape, and the role of rural cemeteries in the evolution of American landscape design. Campopiano, Michelle. “Cooperation and Private Enterprise in Water Management in Iraq: Continuity and Change between the Sasanian and Early Islamic Periods (Sixth to Ninth Centuries).” Environment and History 23 (August 2017): 385–407. A study of water management in Late Sasanian and Early Islamic Iraq, between the sixth and tenth centuries. Looks at how the management of water resources depended on interactions between local communities, aristocratic rulers, and the imperial bureaucracy. Details how water management systems allowed for the expansion of irrigated agriculture. Colpitts, George. “Knowing Nature in the Business Records of the Hudson’s Bay Company, 1670–1840.” Business History 59 (October 2017): 1054–80. Looks at the environmental record of British North America provided by the London-based Hudson’s Bay Company from its founding in 1670 through the early nineteenth century. Details the changing quality and flow of environmental information by the company, with an eventual shift in content by the nineteenth century when directors privileged “facts” rather than mere environmental observation. Formia, Elena. “Mediating an Ecological Awareness in Italy: Shared Visions of Sustainability between the Environmental Movement and Radical Design Cultures (1970–1976).” Journal of Design History 30 (May 2017): 192–211. Considers a short period during the 1970s in which the theories and initiatives of the Italian environmental movement intersected with those of design cultures. Looks at how growing environmentalism, left-wing politics, the reception of American counterculture movements, and more, created an ecological awareness and collective consciousness in Italy during this time period. Gergan, Mabel Denzin. “Living with Earthquakes and Angry Deities at the Himalayan Borderlands.” Annals of the American Association of Geographers 107 (March 2017): 490–98. Explores indigenous people’s response to the intersection of concerns around earthquakes and hydropower development in the Indian Himalayan Region. Details how people’s relationship with a sacred animate landscape is not easily translatable into the clear goals of environmental politics. Argues that anxieties over earthquakes are grounded in a longer history of the contested relationship between marginalized peoples and state powers. Goodchild, Hayley. “The Problem of Milk in the Nineteenth-Century Ontario Cheese Industry: An Envirotechnical Approach to Business History.” Business History 59 (October 2017): 1081–1110. Provides a case study for combining environmental and business histories, examining Ontario’s export-oriented cheese industry over the second half of the nineteenth century. Looks at how the reorganization of cheese production from farms to factories in the 1860s increased opportunities for the spoilage and adulteration of milk while also making the detecting and managing of the same more difficult. He, Wenka. “‘Public Interest’ as a Basis for Early Modern State-Society Interactions: Water Control Projects in Qing China, 1750–1850.” Environment and History 23 (August 2017): 455–76. Examines the political process of the state in Qing China between 1720 and 1850 in the area of water and irrigation management. Looks at how collusion between local gentry and government officials over hydraulic projects often sacrificed the public interest, and initiated conflicts between upstream and downstream populations as well as between commercial transportation interests and local irrigation needs. Hedberg, David-Paul B. “Seeing Portland’s Urban Forest for Its History.” Western Historical Quarterly 47 (November 2016): 463–70. Discusses the history of Portland, Oregon, by focusing on the history of the city’s trees arising from the public history project “Portland’s Heritage Tree Program.” Looks at topics such as the city’s codes related to heritage trees, trees in historic images of the city, the work of nineteenth-century social reformer and gardener Rosetta Burrell, and the history of the native Oregon white oak on Overton Street that predates the city’s settlement. Johnson, Nick. “Workers’ Weed: Cannabis, Sugar Beets, and Landscapes of Labor in the American West, 1900–1946.” Agricultural History 91 (Summer 2017): 320–41. Examines interactions between Mexican American farm works, the cannabis plant, and the agricultural landscape of the American West during the first half of the twentieth century. Looks at how farm workers used traditional knowledge of cannabis to illegally supplement their income and attempt to better their standing at the bottom of the region’s socioeconomic ladder. Jones, Karen. “The Story of Comanche: Horsepower, Heroism and the Conquest of the American West.” War and Society 36 (August 2017): 156–81. Examines the famous cavalry horse, Comanche, as a way to explore the history of warhorses in the military culture of the American West, as well as to point toward a growing scholarship on war and the environment that emphasizes the usefulness of such themes as interspecies exchange. Comanche succumbed to colic in 1891 at a critical moment in the history of the American Western frontier. Labrague, Michelle. “Patagonia, A Case Study in the Historical Development of Slow Thinking.” Journal of Design History 30 (May 2017): 175–91. As fashion and design history expands to incorporate environmental history, this article presents a historical case study of the material culture of the American activewear brand Patagonia. Looks at how the brand’s catalogs have historically highlighted some of the tensions between the differing schools of ecological thought and the problems presented by applying those values to design and sportswear practice. Lepofsky, Dana, et al. “Historical Ecology of Cultural Keystone Places of the Northwest Coast.” American Anthropologist 119 (September 2017): 448–63. Documents the history of three cultural keystone places in coastal British Columbia, Canada: Hauyat, Laxgalts’ap (Old Town), and Dałk Gyilakyaw (Robin Town). Looks at how the traditional lands of indigenous peoples serve as archives of their histories, also revealing unique insights into the history of human-environmental interactions. Meyer, Judith. “Yellowstone’s Howard Eaton Trail.” Western Historical Quarterly 48 (Summer 2017): 191–95. Looks at the significance of the Howard Eaton Trail to the cultural and physical landscape of Yellowstone National Park. Also examines the work of guide Howard Eaton, for whom the trail was named and dedicated in 1923, as well as attempting to discern whether Eaton actually scouted the route of the trail. Morgan, John Emry. “The Micro-Politics of Water Management in Early Modern England: Regulation and Representation in Commissions of Sewers.” Environment and History 23 (August 2017): 409–30. Analyzes the social and political history of water management in southwest and eastern England during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Looks at the rise and decline of public influence over water management through the Commissions of Sewers and popular knowledge over local drainage networks and flood defense systems. Eventually the agency of local stakeholders was removed from the process, limiting an element of immediate ecological responsiveness. Newton, Jason L. “‘These French Canadian of the Woods Are Half-Wild Folk’: Wilderness, Whiteness, and Work in North America, 1840–1955.” Labour/Le Travail 77 (Spring 2016): 121–50. Discusses ideas of race, wilderness, and work, looking at how these subjects relate to the immigration of French Canadian loggers to the United States between 1840 and 1955. Reveals insights into how North Americans of this time period connected ideals about race with the realities of industrial work, for example the supposed French Canadian affinity for logging work. Nisbet, James. “Environmental Abstraction and the Polluted Image.” American Art 31 (Spring 2017): 114–31. Examines the history of art, environmental abstraction, and pollution in American history, with a focus on the work of artists such as J. M. W. Turner, Edward Burtynsky, and Bruce Nauman. Also looks at conceptual art depictions of pollution and smog in Los Angeles, California, during the twentieth century. Nisha, P. R. “Ban and Benevolence: Circus, Animals and Indian State.” Indian Economic and Social History Review 54 (April-June 2017): 239–66. Explores the legal battle surrounding the ban on the training and performance of certain wild animals by the Ministry of Environment and Forests in India in 1991. Provides discourses on wild and captive animals, circuses and the history of animal training, and the ideas of rescue, rehabilitation, and conservation. Also discusses the history of hunting and wildlife policies of the colonial and postcolonial states in India. Nobbs-Thiessen, Ben. “Cheese Is Culture and Soy Is Commodity: Environmental Change in a Bolivian Mennonite Colony.” Journal of Mennonite Studies 35 (2017): 303–28. Discusses the history of the dairy and soy industry in a Bolivian Mennonite colony over the late twentieth century. Includes examination of the environmental history of Mennonite farming practices in Bolivia, food security and export agriculture in the region, and transplanting milk production from Mexico to Bolivia. Ore, Kathryn Sears. “Form and Substance: The National Historic Preservation Act, Badger-Two Medicine, and Meaningful Consultation.” Public Land and Resources Law Review 38 (2017): 205–44. Provides a study of meaningful consultation between federal agencies and an American Indian tribe, focused around Badger-Two Medicine, a cultural landscape along the border of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Glacier National Park, and the Bob Marshall Wilderness in Montana. Discusses the history of the National Historic Preservation Act and how collaborations with Native Americans under the act have operated. Oteng-Ababio, Martin, et al. “Landfill Externalities and Property Values Dilemma: Emerging Insights from Three Ghanaian Cities.” Journal of Contemporary African Studies 35 (July 2017): 349–69. A study of the negative impacts that landfills exert on land and property values in developing countries, using a case study of three cities in Ghana. Looks at landfills in these communities over the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, arguing that most engineered landfills in the country serve as a catalyst in correcting the ills of uncontrolled urbanization. Patrick, Andrew P. “Birth of the Bluegrass: Ecological Transformations in Central Kentucky to 1810.” Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 115 (Spring 2017): 155–82. Details the ecological transformations in the history of central Kentucky from 1000 through 1810, focusing on the birth of bluegrass, the role of human influences on ecological developments, and the emergence of modern environmentalism. Reid, Mark Collin. “Timber!” Canada’s History 97 (October/November 2017): 20–23. Provides an overview of the history of logging and forestry in Canada, focusing on the equipment used, production methods, and cultural aspects. Includes discussion of the poll axe and broad axe used by early lumberjacks, as well as women who worked jobs in forest industries during World War II. Smith-Howard, Kendra. “Healing Animals in an Antibiotic Age: Veterinary Drugs and the Professionalism Crisis, 1945–1970.” Technology and Culture 58 (July 2017): 722–48. Discusses the impacts of the introduction of antibiotics in agriculture between 1945 and 1970. Looks at debates over farmers increasingly taking over animal healing without veterinary supervision, as well as the increased reliance on antibiotics in the postwar era, growing bacterial resistance, and federal agricultural regulations. Spears, Ellen Griffith. “(Re)Writing Histories of Environmentalism in Alabama.” Alabama Review 70 (April 2017): 171–88. Argues for the need for greater scholarly attention to southern landscapes in environmental history, focusing on the history of environmentalism in Alabama. Documents the US South as the location of far more environmental activism than has been acknowledged, despite the region’s hospitality to polluting industries and resistance by southern legislatures to passing strong environmental laws. Sylvester, Kenneth M., and Paul W. Rhode. “Making Green Revolutions: Kansas Farms, Recovery, and the New Agriculture, 1918–1981.” Agricultural History 91 (Summer 2017): 342–68. Uses farm-level survey data from the Kansas State Board of Agriculture that provides a detailed record of residential and land use histories of rural communities over the course of the twentieth century. Provides insight into how farm households in Kansas responded to the drought years of the dust bowl era and adjusted into a period of recovery and growth following World War II. Tielhof, Milja Van. “Regional Planning in a Decentralized State: How Administrative Practices Contributed to Consensus-Building in Sixteenth-Century Holland.” Environment and History 23 (August 2017): 431–53. Provides a history of regional water management under the imperial Habsburg government in sixteenth-century Holland. Details the collection of local-level information on drainage schemes and how this influenced the ongoing state formation process. Wilson, Richa. “Building the Forest Service in Utah: An Architectural Context.” Utah Historical Quarterly 85 (Winter 2017): 40–58. A history of the construction of permanent buildings by the US Forest Service in Utah, focusing on the first half of the twentieth century. Looks at the work of early rangers in constructing cabins and dwellings, the implementation of design standards and construction manuals, and the importance of facility construction to recreational growth on US public lands. DISSERTATIONS AND THESES Beer, Clare Marie. “Enclosing Ecology? Land Conservation and Environmental Statecraft in Chile.” Master’s thesis, University of California, Los Angeles, 2017. 123 pp. Examines the rise of private protected areas in Chile and their relationship to the state’s public protected areas network. Draws on archival and historical evidence to argue that land conservation and protection in Chile is aimed at reproducing state interests as much as, if not more than, advancing environmental and biodiversity outcomes. Carlson Dietmeier, Jenna Kay. “Beyond the Butcher’s Block: The Animal Landscapes of Eighteenth-Century Chesapeake and Lowcountry Plantations.” PhD dissertation, College of William and Mary, 2017. 453 pp. Argues that working oxen, horses, and mules contributed to the physical and social landscapes of eighteenth-century plantations in the Chesapeake and the Lowcountry regions of Virginia and South Carolina. In both regions, interactions between humans and animals combined with the physicality of the plantations to create landscapes of domination and resistance. Dolbee, Samuel. “The Locust and the Starling: People, Insects, and Disease in the Late Ottoman Jazira and After, 1860–1940.” PhD dissertation, New York University, 2017. 413 pp. A study reconstructing the environmental history of the Jazira, the steppe region between the Euphrates and the Tigris at the foot of the Anatolian Plateau, between 1860 and 1940. Argues that new state borders during this time period gave power to locusts, nomads, and cholera because they were able to move in ways that state officials could not. Gettig, Eric T. “Oil and Revolution in Cuba: Development, Nationalism, and the U.S. Energy Empire, 1902–1961.” PhD dissertation, Georgetown University, 2017. 654 pp. Using approaches from environmental, economic, diplomatic, and cultural history, this study looks at how oil and energy sources shaped Cuban nationalism and relations with the United States between 1902 and 1961. Reveals how Cubans equated modernity with rising energy consumption and viewed oil in nationalist terms, believing that nature had endowed the island with great, but unfulfilled, promise as an oil producer. Herring, Kalila. “Seeing the Forest and the Trees: Tracing Fuel Use and Landscape Change on the Eastern Pequot Reservation 1740–1850.” Master’s thesis, University of Massachusetts, Boston, 2017. 163 pp. Looks at fuelwood use by the Eastern Pequot, a Native American nation in Connecticut, during a time of regional deforestation and an altering landscape due to rapidly expanding agriculture. Also looks at how this population, living on a reservation in a colonial environment, dealt with timber theft, a reduced land base, overseer control, and the overall environmental changes of this time period. Newton, Jason L. “Forging Titans: The Rise of Industrial Capitalism in the Northern Forest, 1850–1950.” PhD dissertation, Syracuse University, 2017. 571 pp. Looks at the labor and environmental history of the lumber industry in the US Northeast, describing the historical processes that made rural laborers into a coherent class of wage-working lumberjacks and how this class became an iconic symbol of masculinity in twentieth-century America. Argues that because lumberjacks were seen as part of nature, they became masculine icons for self-diagnosed overcivilized urban corporate elites who were looking outside the city for examples of natural masculinity. Song, Sikang. “Building a Smoking Society: Culture and Ecology of the Tobacco Industry in North China, 1902–1937.” PhD dissertation, Washington State University, 2017. 272 pp. Details how beginning in 1902 the British-American Tobacco Company began its business expansion in China by mass-marketing machine-rolled cigarettes to Chinese consumers, monopolizing the market and transforming Chinese tobacco production and consumption toward cigarettes. This new commodity chain left significant environmental impacts on Chinese agriculture as the tobacco cultivation and peasants’ livelihood in North China were linked to the globalizing industrial economy. Williams, Bryon P. “Race, Retreat, and Refuge: Black Voices, American Nature Writing, and Ecocritical Exile.” PhD dissertation, Duquesne University, 2017. 209 pp. Examines the absence of nineteenth-century black-authored environmental writing in modern studies and anthologies. Argues that contemporary racially aligned divides and gaps in environmental discourse have roots in the 1840s and 1850s when the nature-writing genre coalesced into its most enduring form in the works of Henry David Thoreau. Also reveals that there do exist published works from the mid-nineteenth century that include numerous first-person accounts of black eco-actors in intensive relationship with the natural environment, but that these narratives have been rendered invisible as nature writing. Zhang, Meng. “Timber Trade along the Yangzi River: Market, Institutions, and Environment, 1750–1911.” PhD dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles, 2017. 368 pp. Studies the history of the long-distance timber trade along China’s Yangzi River during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Demonstrates how this voluminous trade was an important aspect of the economic, environmental, and frontier history of Qing China. Looks at the local population’s active participation in both the timber trade and tree planting. ARCHIVAL SOURCES New Haven Museum & Historical Society Library 114 Whitney Avenue New Haven, CT 06510 Alderman, Nancy O. 1978–2006 3 boxes Nancy O. Alderman Papers This collection contains material collected during Nancy O. Alderman’s involvement in various environmental organizations in the New Haven, Connecticut, area, including newspaper clippings, newsletters, correspondence, and transcripts of talks. J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah Special Collections 295 South 1500 East Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0860 Black, James Bruce 1992–1994 0.25 linear feet Bruce James Black Papers Bruce James Black (b. 1954) went to Germany on a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) from 1974 to 1976. He then attended the University of Utah and graduated cum laude in 1979 with a BA in art history and a BA in German. Black wrote, “A Chronological History of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 1966–1976.” The Bruce James Black papers (1992–94) contain a copy of “ A Chronological History of Environmental Movement in Utah,” as well as research notes, articles, and chronologies. Black served an LDS mission to Germany and graduated from the University of Utah in 1979. Central Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan University Archives Harden Learning Resources Center 126 1401 Presque Isle Avenue Marquette, MI 49855 Cantrill, James G. (James Gerard) 1980–2007 4.0 cubic feet James G. Cantrill Papers James G. Cantrill received his PhD in speech communication from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1985. He currently serves as professor and head of the Department of Communications and Performance Studies at Northern Michigan University (NMU). He began his appointment at NMU in 1990. Cantrill’s area of expertise and related scholarship is in environmental communication. He is a consultant for the US Environmental Protection Agency and Parks Canada, among other organizations. His research record has helped him earn external grants from such agencies as the US Forest Service, the Great Lakes National Program Office, and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. Since coming to NMU in 1990, Cantrill has written or co-edited numerous books, journal articles, and technical papers. He often involves NMU students in his publications and presentations. This collection documents James Cantrill’s administrative, professional, and curricular activities, mostly at NMU in Marquette, Michigan. Records include studies, committee material, conference material, First Year Experience, and course files from 1980 to 2007. University of Southern California USC Libraries Special Collections Doheny Memorial Library 206 3550 Trousdale Parkway Los Angeles, CA 90089-0189 Citizens Committee to Save Elysian Park 1965–2008 11.0 linear feet; 11 boxes Citizens Committee to Save Elysian Park Records The Citizens Committee to Save Elysian Park was founded in 1965 to organize public and official awareness and to raise support to preserve the park land as public open space and develop it for recreational activities. Elysian Park is Los Angeles’s first and oldest park. The mission and efforts of this vibrant grassroots organization are ongoing, and the committee will continue to add materials that document its activities. This collection consists of nine boxes of records dating back to the committee’s early history in the 1960s. It was donated by the 2004 board of directors of the committee. University of California, Riverside Rivera Library, Special Collections Department P.O. Box 5900 University of California Riverside, CA 92517-5900 Citrus Research Center and Agricultural Experiment Station 1808–2007 63.0 linear feet University of California, Riverside, Citrus Research Center and Agricultural Experiment Station Records The Citrus Research Center and Agricultural Experiment Station (CRC-AES) was established by the regents of the University of California (UC) on February 14, 1907. In the late 1800s, the citrus industry was quickly expanding in Southern California, so a research facility was needed closer than the state Agricultural Experiment Station located in Berkeley. In 1899 John Henry Reed, a citrus grower and member of the Riverside Horticultural Club, developed a proposal for the construction of an experiment station in Riverside for the purpose of improving the growth and production of citrus crops. Over the next five years, Reed and his fellow club members created petitions, acquired endorsements, and lobbied the California legislature to have a station developed. In May 1906, a group of commissioners was created to represent the UC regents and approved a plan that would allow for the establishment of an organization with two separate branches: a laboratory in Whittier and an experiment station in Riverside. The CRC-AES records collection contains administrative records, correspondence, faculty papers, publications, scrapbooks, clippings, photographs, reports, project files, and other relevant material. Formerly known as the Citrus Experiment Station (CES), the bulk of materials precede the establishment of UC Riverside’s College of Letters and Sciences in 1954. The majority of topics document the history, events, faculty, staff, facilities, research, and experiments of CES. Materials related to CES research and experiments pertain to the physiology and morphology of citrus, fig, date palm, avocado, and other subtropical crops, soil management, smog studies, pest control, and diseases. Most citrus-related publications and faculty papers were originally part of the former UC Graduate School of Tropical Agriculture and Citrus Experiment Station Library. Project files pertain to research and experiments conducted by CES staff, faculty, and associated members. In addition, other subjects include the history of the citrus and avocado industry in Southern California, the introduction of the first Washington navel orange tree, and global production and marketing of citrus and subtropical agriculture. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Southern Historical Collection Wilson Library Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Colton, Marie Watters 1978–1994 14 items; 3.0 linear feet Marie Watters Colton Scrapbooks and Audiocassette Marie Watters Colton of Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina, represented the 51st district in the North Carolina House of Representatives (1978–94). A University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill graduate, Colton married Henry E. Colton. The couple lived first in Chapel Hill and later in Asheville. After her husband, an Asheville City councilman, declined to run for state office, Marie Colton campaigned for and won the seat. Colton, a Democrat, was the first female speaker pro tempore of the House, serving in that role from 1991 to 1994. In recognition of her advocacy of women and children’s issues, Colton was appointed to the UN Commission on the Status of Women in 1994. The collection includes scrapbooks related to Marie Colton’s activities in the North Carolina General Assembly (1978–94). Scrapbooks contain newspaper clippings, photographs, letters from constituents and lobbyists, notes from government officials, and other materials. Topics include corporal punishment, conservation and environmentalism, billboards, alternative medicine, tax reform, historic preservation, tourism and economic development in western North Carolina, child welfare protection, domestic violence laws, and legislative ethics reform. Newspaper clippings detail Colton’s promotion of stronger sedimentation laws, years of fighting to allow local school boards to ban corporal punishment, handling of the state budget crisis in 1991, reelection campaigns, and efforts to ban highway billboard signs. Scattered throughout are legislative directories and notes on legislative sessions that demonstrate her wit and sense of humor. Also included is an audiocassette containing Colton’s 1990 speaker pro tempore acceptance speech. University of Massachusetts at Amherst Special Collections and University Archives, 154 Hicks Way Amherst, MA 01003-9275 Friends of Tully Lake 1976–2008 1 box; 0.5 linear feet Friends of Tully Lake records In October 2003, a group of residents from the North Quabbin region in Massachusetts came together to oppose plans to develop a large tract overlooking the southeast shore of Tully Lake. Concerned about the environmental and social impact of the proposed development and asserting the rights of the towns and residents affected to have a say, the Friends of Tully Lake waged a five-year campaign that ultimately succeeded in convincing the Planning Board in the town of Athol to reject the proposal. The records of the Friends of Tully Lake document a successful grassroots initiative to prevent private development on a lake in the North Quabbin region. Maintained by Aaron Ellison and Elizabeth Farnsworth, leaders in the organization, the collection includes notes and minutes of the meetings, communication with environmental consultants, exchanges with the Athol Planning Board, and some background information environmental regulations in Massachusetts. Forest History Society 701 William Vickers Avenue Durham, NC 27701 Klahn, Austin E. 1940–1989 3.5 linear feet Austin E. Klahn Papers Austin Elwood Klahn (1917–2016) worked for the US Forest Service and Army Soil Conservation Service in Texas, Oregon, and Washington, with a significant portion of his career spent on the Okanogan National Forest in Washington. This collection contains paperwork related to Austin Klahn’s time working with the US Forest Service and Army Soil Conservation Service including photographs, personnel records, and maps. Also included in the collection are US Forest Service uniforms, pins, hard hats, signage, and other items as well as a metal toy of Smokey Bear in a jeep from the 1960s. University of California, Los Angeles Department of Special Collections Charles E. Young Research Library, Box 951575 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1575 Lillard, Richard Gordon 1940–1988 185 boxes; 92.5 linear feet; 2 oversize boxes Richard Gordon Lillard Papers Richard Gordon Lillard (1909–90) was an English professor and author. He taught at Los Angeles City College (1933–34, 1935–42, and 1962–65), Indiana University (1943–47), UCLA (1947–65), and California State University, Los Angeles (1965–1974). In 1948 he won the Silver Medal of the Commonwealth Club of California for The Great Forest (1947). His other publications include Desert Challenge: An Interpretation of Nevada (1942) and Eden in Jeopardy (1966). This collection consists primarily of Richard Lillard’s manuscripts and notes for articles and unpublished work but also contains personal items and materials related to his academic career. University of New Mexico, Center for Southwest Research. Zimmerman Library Albuquerque, NM 87131-1466 Sam Hitt Forest Guardians 1988–2003 3 boxes; 3 cubic feet Sam Hitt Forest Guardians Collection Forest Guardians is a nonprofit environmental group that focuses on the Southwest of the United States. Forest Guardians was founded in 1989 under the direction of Sam Hitt. Forest Guardians’ website describes the organization as a results-driven group that attempts to defend and preserve threatened southwestern wildlife and ecosystems (including the American Southwest and northern Mexico). Their approach to conservation combines scientific analysis with strategic litigation in an effort to enforce existing environmental laws and reform public policies. The larger goal of the organization is to protect and restore native southwestern biological diversity and watersheds. Forest Guardians is committed to public education and enlisting citizen support for the protection of the Southwest; advocating for biological conservation; enforcing and strengthening environmental laws; assisting communities in efforts to protect land; and advocating for sustainable use of natural resources. This collection contains Sam Hitt’s personal collection of Forest Guardians records. Forest Guardians was an environmental organization based in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The collection details research, politics, and advocacy pertaining to various environmental topics. University of Illinois at Springfield, Archives Norris L. Brookens Library University of Illinois at Springfield One University Plaza Springfield, IL 62703 Saratoga County 1988–1995 1 folder ILSR Recycling Archives, Saratoga County Recycling Collection A collection of materials related to recycling projects in Saratoga County, New York, during the late 1980s and 1990s, providing historical background on the recycling movement and its implementation in the county. Includes newspaper clippings, email correspondence, and a brochure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Environmental History and the Forest History Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

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Environmental HistoryOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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