Negotiating Palestinian Womanhood: Encounters between Palestinian Women and American Missionaries, 1880s–1940s

Negotiating Palestinian Womanhood: Encounters between Palestinian Women and American... Book Reviews 1037 what becomes clear is that the colonial pasto - reconcile different views about education for ral, at its core, relied on this crucial labor. girls. Missionaries, students, and Palestinian Arab nationalists agreed that girls should be Vernadette Gonzalez educated for work in the home, believing that University of Hawai‘ i at Mānoa modern methods of home management were Honolulu, Hawaii consistent with the ideals of a progressiv - e na doi: 10.1093/jahist/jax485 tion. Yet a disagreement over the teaching of home economics in the 1930s forced students to choose between vocational training and aca - Negotiating Palestinian Womanhood:  Encoun- demic classes as a springboard to further edu - ters between Palestinian Women and American cation and careers. Parents saw no distinction Missionaries, 1880s–1940s. By Enaya Ham- between the options, wanting their daughters mad Othman. (Lanham: Rowman & Litt-le to learn home economics as well as academic field, 2016. xxiv, 215 pp. $90.00.) subjects. At the same time, many young wom - en who graduated from fgs enjoyed careers Enaya Hammad Othman makes a welcome contribution to scholarship exploring tand chose not to marr he y. Othman also analyzes the changing per - cep American Protestant missionary enterprise in tions of Quaker women, many uninformed the Middle East. She introduces Quakers (the Society of Friends) to the mix of denom - ina about the local environment. Teachers grad - ually changed their initially negative -percep tions operating in the region and focuses her tions, learned Arabic and Arab history, and narrative on the Friends Girls Sch fg os o) i l ( n began to appreciate local customs. In response Ramallah. The school managed to enroll s - tu to local demands and a rising tide of Arab na - dents, mostly urban Arab Christians, during the period of the late Ottoman Empire and thtionalism, e they also introduced changes to their curriculum (including adding Arabic - lit British Mandate. Yet Quakers were successful erature), welcomed Arab Christian colleagues, in promoting their ideas only where students, and the larger Palestinian community, werand put the management of the school in the e hands of a Palestinian graduate. already open to change. As Othman argues, Othman relies heavily on mission sources. Quaker views about peace, pacifism, and i -n ternationalism set them apart from oth- er miH s er arguments could have been strengthened by greater use of Palestinian Arab sources from sionaries and made an important contribution outside the school. Nonetheless, her book - af to shaping their students’ gender and national firms the significance of the Quaker impact in identities. Ramallah; the school still exists there as a co - Rather than seeking to convert students to their religion, Quakers sought to imbue them educational Palestinian institution using Ara - bic as the language of instruction. with ideals of pacifism and neutrality, and en - couraged them to become mediators in the Barbara Reeves-Ellington struggle for women’s rights and the national Cheshire, England Palestinian movement. With access to student doi: 10.1093/jahist/jax486 essays from the era of the British Mandate and interviews with former students conducted in 2006, Othman highlights the challenges stu - Chow Chop Suey: Food and the Chinese Ameri- dents faced as they attempted to reconcile can Journey. By Anne Mendelson. (New York: Quaker teachings with their domestic Arab Columbia University Press, 2016. xx, 330 pp. Christian culture and the political realities $3of 5.00.) British-supported Zionism. Many essays gave voice to a view that Palestine could be home This well-researched and well-written book to Jews, Christians, and Muslims and a space studies the historical process through which where Arab culture could flourish. Chinese cuisine developed and was accepted Student essays also emphasized the diffi - in American society. Anne Mendelson, a culties that teachers faced in their attempts to food historian, successfully weaves political Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jah/article-abstract/104/4/1037/4932663 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of American History Oxford University Press

Negotiating Palestinian Womanhood: Encounters between Palestinian Women and American Missionaries, 1880s–1940s

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Oxford University Press
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© The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Organization of American Historians. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
0021-8723
eISSN
1945-2314
D.O.I.
10.1093/jahist/jax486
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Abstract

Book Reviews 1037 what becomes clear is that the colonial pasto - reconcile different views about education for ral, at its core, relied on this crucial labor. girls. Missionaries, students, and Palestinian Arab nationalists agreed that girls should be Vernadette Gonzalez educated for work in the home, believing that University of Hawai‘ i at Mānoa modern methods of home management were Honolulu, Hawaii consistent with the ideals of a progressiv - e na doi: 10.1093/jahist/jax485 tion. Yet a disagreement over the teaching of home economics in the 1930s forced students to choose between vocational training and aca - Negotiating Palestinian Womanhood:  Encoun- demic classes as a springboard to further edu - ters between Palestinian Women and American cation and careers. Parents saw no distinction Missionaries, 1880s–1940s. By Enaya Ham- between the options, wanting their daughters mad Othman. (Lanham: Rowman & Litt-le to learn home economics as well as academic field, 2016. xxiv, 215 pp. $90.00.) subjects. At the same time, many young wom - en who graduated from fgs enjoyed careers Enaya Hammad Othman makes a welcome contribution to scholarship exploring tand chose not to marr he y. Othman also analyzes the changing per - cep American Protestant missionary enterprise in tions of Quaker women, many uninformed the Middle East. She introduces Quakers (the Society of Friends) to the mix of denom - ina about the local environment. Teachers grad - ually changed their initially negative -percep tions operating in the region and focuses her tions, learned Arabic and Arab history, and narrative on the Friends Girls Sch fg os o) i l ( n began to appreciate local customs. In response Ramallah. The school managed to enroll s - tu to local demands and a rising tide of Arab na - dents, mostly urban Arab Christians, during the period of the late Ottoman Empire and thtionalism, e they also introduced changes to their curriculum (including adding Arabic - lit British Mandate. Yet Quakers were successful erature), welcomed Arab Christian colleagues, in promoting their ideas only where students, and the larger Palestinian community, werand put the management of the school in the e hands of a Palestinian graduate. already open to change. As Othman argues, Othman relies heavily on mission sources. Quaker views about peace, pacifism, and i -n ternationalism set them apart from oth- er miH s er arguments could have been strengthened by greater use of Palestinian Arab sources from sionaries and made an important contribution outside the school. Nonetheless, her book - af to shaping their students’ gender and national firms the significance of the Quaker impact in identities. Ramallah; the school still exists there as a co - Rather than seeking to convert students to their religion, Quakers sought to imbue them educational Palestinian institution using Ara - bic as the language of instruction. with ideals of pacifism and neutrality, and en - couraged them to become mediators in the Barbara Reeves-Ellington struggle for women’s rights and the national Cheshire, England Palestinian movement. With access to student doi: 10.1093/jahist/jax486 essays from the era of the British Mandate and interviews with former students conducted in 2006, Othman highlights the challenges stu - Chow Chop Suey: Food and the Chinese Ameri- dents faced as they attempted to reconcile can Journey. By Anne Mendelson. (New York: Quaker teachings with their domestic Arab Columbia University Press, 2016. xx, 330 pp. Christian culture and the political realities $3of 5.00.) British-supported Zionism. Many essays gave voice to a view that Palestine could be home This well-researched and well-written book to Jews, Christians, and Muslims and a space studies the historical process through which where Arab culture could flourish. Chinese cuisine developed and was accepted Student essays also emphasized the diffi - in American society. Anne Mendelson, a culties that teachers faced in their attempts to food historian, successfully weaves political Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jah/article-abstract/104/4/1037/4932663 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

Journal

The Journal of American HistoryOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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