Mortality in Relation to Changes in a Healthy Aging Index: The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

Mortality in Relation to Changes in a Healthy Aging Index: The Health, Aging and Body Composition... Abstract Background Baseline scores on a Healthy Aging Index (HAI), including 5 key physiological domains, strongly predict health outcomes. This study aimed to characterize 9-year changes in a HAI and explore their relationship to subsequent mortality. Methods Data are from the Health, Aging and Body Composition study of well-functioning adults aged 70-79. A HAI, which ranges from 0-10, was constructed at year 1 and year 10 of the study including systolic blood pressure, forced expiratory volume, digit symbol substitution test, cystatin C and fasting glucose. The relationships between the HAI at year 1 and year 10 and the change between years and subsequent mortality until year 17 were estimated from Cox proportional hazards models. Results 2264 participants had complete data on a HAI at year 1, of these 1122 had complete data at year 10. HAI scores tended to increase (i.e., get worse) over 9-year follow-up, from (mean (SD)) 4.3 (2.1) to 5.7 (2.1); mean within person change 1.5 (1.6). After multivariable adjustment HAI score was related to mortality from year 1 (Hazard Ratio (95% Confidence Interval) =1.17 (1.13 - 1.21) per unit) and year 10 (1.20 (1.14 - 1.27) per unit). The change between years was also related to mortality (1.08 (1.02 - 1.15) per unit change). Conclusions HAI scores tended to increase with advancing age and stratified mortality rates among participants remaining at year 10. The HAI may prove useful to understand changes in health with aging. Successful Aging, Epidemiology, Mortality, Physiology © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical Sciences Oxford University Press

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
1079-5006
eISSN
1758-535X
D.O.I.
10.1093/gerona/gly114
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background Baseline scores on a Healthy Aging Index (HAI), including 5 key physiological domains, strongly predict health outcomes. This study aimed to characterize 9-year changes in a HAI and explore their relationship to subsequent mortality. Methods Data are from the Health, Aging and Body Composition study of well-functioning adults aged 70-79. A HAI, which ranges from 0-10, was constructed at year 1 and year 10 of the study including systolic blood pressure, forced expiratory volume, digit symbol substitution test, cystatin C and fasting glucose. The relationships between the HAI at year 1 and year 10 and the change between years and subsequent mortality until year 17 were estimated from Cox proportional hazards models. Results 2264 participants had complete data on a HAI at year 1, of these 1122 had complete data at year 10. HAI scores tended to increase (i.e., get worse) over 9-year follow-up, from (mean (SD)) 4.3 (2.1) to 5.7 (2.1); mean within person change 1.5 (1.6). After multivariable adjustment HAI score was related to mortality from year 1 (Hazard Ratio (95% Confidence Interval) =1.17 (1.13 - 1.21) per unit) and year 10 (1.20 (1.14 - 1.27) per unit). The change between years was also related to mortality (1.08 (1.02 - 1.15) per unit change). Conclusions HAI scores tended to increase with advancing age and stratified mortality rates among participants remaining at year 10. The HAI may prove useful to understand changes in health with aging. Successful Aging, Epidemiology, Mortality, Physiology © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical SciencesOxford University Press

Published: May 4, 2018

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