Medical History, Medication Use, and Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

Medical History, Medication Use, and Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Abstract Because persistent inflammation may render the nasopharyngeal mucosa susceptible to carcinogenesis, chronic ear/nose/throat (ENT) disease and its treatment might influence the risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Existing evidence is, however, inconclusive and often based on methodologically suboptimal epidemiologic studies. In a population-based case-control study in southern China, we enrolled 2532 NPC cases and 2597 controls aged 20–74 years from 2010 to 2014. Odds ratios were estimated for associations between NPC risk and history of ENT and related medications. Any history of chronic ENT disease was associated with a 34% increased risk of NPC. Similarly, use of nasal drops or aspirin was associated with approximately doubled risk of NPC. However, in secondary analyses restricted to chronic ENT diseases and related medication use at least 5 years prior to diagnosis/interview, most results were statistically non-significant, except a history of uncured ENT diseases, untreated nasal polyps, and earlier age at first diagnosis of ENT disease and first or most recent aspirin use. Overall, these findings suggest that ENT disease and related drug use are most likely early indications rather than causes of NPC, although the possibility of a modestly increased NPC risk associated with these diseases and related drugs cannot be excluded. Case-control study, Nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Medical history, Medication use Author notes G.H., Y.Z., Y.X.Z., H.O.A., and W.Y. contributed equally to this work. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
0002-9262
eISSN
1476-6256
D.O.I.
10.1093/aje/kwy095
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Because persistent inflammation may render the nasopharyngeal mucosa susceptible to carcinogenesis, chronic ear/nose/throat (ENT) disease and its treatment might influence the risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Existing evidence is, however, inconclusive and often based on methodologically suboptimal epidemiologic studies. In a population-based case-control study in southern China, we enrolled 2532 NPC cases and 2597 controls aged 20–74 years from 2010 to 2014. Odds ratios were estimated for associations between NPC risk and history of ENT and related medications. Any history of chronic ENT disease was associated with a 34% increased risk of NPC. Similarly, use of nasal drops or aspirin was associated with approximately doubled risk of NPC. However, in secondary analyses restricted to chronic ENT diseases and related medication use at least 5 years prior to diagnosis/interview, most results were statistically non-significant, except a history of uncured ENT diseases, untreated nasal polyps, and earlier age at first diagnosis of ENT disease and first or most recent aspirin use. Overall, these findings suggest that ENT disease and related drug use are most likely early indications rather than causes of NPC, although the possibility of a modestly increased NPC risk associated with these diseases and related drugs cannot be excluded. Case-control study, Nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Medical history, Medication use Author notes G.H., Y.Z., Y.X.Z., H.O.A., and W.Y. contributed equally to this work. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

American Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: Apr 26, 2018

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