Marine magnetotelluric inversion with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh

Marine magnetotelluric inversion with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh Summary The finite element method using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh is one of the most effective methods for the three-dimensional modelling of marine magnetotelluric data which are strongly affected by bathymetry, because it enables us to incorporate both small-scale and regional-scale bathymetry into a computational mesh with a practical number of elements. The authors applied a three-dimensional inversion scheme using mesh of this type to marine magnetotelluric problems for the first time and verified its applicability. Forward calculations for two bathymetry models demonstrated that the results obtained with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh are close to the reference solutions. To evaluate the forward calculation results, we developed a general TM-mode analytical formulation for a two-dimensional sinusoidal topography. Moreover, synthetic inversion test results confirmed that a three-dimensional inversion scheme with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh enables us to recover subseafloor resistivity structure properly even for a model including a land–sea boundary as well as seafloor undulations. The verified inversion scheme was subsequently applied to a set of marine magnetotelluric data observed around the Iheya North Knoll, the middle Okinawa Trough. Three-dimensional modelling using a mesh with precise bathymetry demonstrated that the data observed around the Iheya North Knoll are strongly affected by bathymetry, especially by the sea-depth differences between the depression of the trough and the shallow East China Sea. The estimated resistivity structure under the knoll is characterized by a conductive surface layer underlain by a resistive layer. The conductive layer implies permeable pelagic/hemi-pelagic sediments, which are consistent with a previous seismological study. Furthermore, the conductive layer has a resistive part immediately below the knoll, which is regarded as the consolidated magma intrusion that formed the knoll. Furthermore, at depth of 10 km, we found that the resistor underneath the knoll extends to the southeast, implying that subseafloor resistivity under the Volcanic Arc Migration Phenomenon (VAMP) area is more resistive than the surroundings due to the presence of consolidated magma. Electrical properties, Magnetotellurics, Marine electromagnetics, Numerical modelling, Inverse theory, Backarc basin processes © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geophysical Journal International Oxford University Press

Marine magnetotelluric inversion with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society.
ISSN
0956-540X
eISSN
1365-246X
D.O.I.
10.1093/gji/ggy171
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary The finite element method using an unstructured tetrahedral mesh is one of the most effective methods for the three-dimensional modelling of marine magnetotelluric data which are strongly affected by bathymetry, because it enables us to incorporate both small-scale and regional-scale bathymetry into a computational mesh with a practical number of elements. The authors applied a three-dimensional inversion scheme using mesh of this type to marine magnetotelluric problems for the first time and verified its applicability. Forward calculations for two bathymetry models demonstrated that the results obtained with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh are close to the reference solutions. To evaluate the forward calculation results, we developed a general TM-mode analytical formulation for a two-dimensional sinusoidal topography. Moreover, synthetic inversion test results confirmed that a three-dimensional inversion scheme with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh enables us to recover subseafloor resistivity structure properly even for a model including a land–sea boundary as well as seafloor undulations. The verified inversion scheme was subsequently applied to a set of marine magnetotelluric data observed around the Iheya North Knoll, the middle Okinawa Trough. Three-dimensional modelling using a mesh with precise bathymetry demonstrated that the data observed around the Iheya North Knoll are strongly affected by bathymetry, especially by the sea-depth differences between the depression of the trough and the shallow East China Sea. The estimated resistivity structure under the knoll is characterized by a conductive surface layer underlain by a resistive layer. The conductive layer implies permeable pelagic/hemi-pelagic sediments, which are consistent with a previous seismological study. Furthermore, the conductive layer has a resistive part immediately below the knoll, which is regarded as the consolidated magma intrusion that formed the knoll. Furthermore, at depth of 10 km, we found that the resistor underneath the knoll extends to the southeast, implying that subseafloor resistivity under the Volcanic Arc Migration Phenomenon (VAMP) area is more resistive than the surroundings due to the presence of consolidated magma. Electrical properties, Magnetotellurics, Marine electromagnetics, Numerical modelling, Inverse theory, Backarc basin processes © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Geophysical Journal InternationalOxford University Press

Published: May 5, 2018

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