Marching Toward Assimilation? The 2006 Immigrant Rights Marches and the Attitudes of Mexican Immigrants About Assimilation

Marching Toward Assimilation? The 2006 Immigrant Rights Marches and the Attitudes of Mexican... Social Problems, 2018, 65, 135 doi: 10.1093/socpro/spx013 Advance Access Publication Date: 11 May 2017 Erratum ERRATUM Marching Toward Assimilation? The 2006 Immigrant Rights Marches and the Attitudes of Mexican Immigrants About Assimilation Lorena Castro Stanford University The following errors were discovered. These have been corrected in the original article. On page 2, in the first paragraph, typographical changes were made to the following sentence so that it now reads: How did the 2006 protests—the largest national protests since the Civil Rights Movement—shape the attitudes about assimilation of Mexican immigrants, the largest and most pol- itically contentious immigrant group? On page 5, a page reference was added to the following sentence: Zhou et al. (2008) suggest that relying solely on “objective” measures that presume middle-class whites as the reference group pro- duces an “incomplete portrait of the process of incorporation” and misses the exceptional intergen- erational mobility that Mexican-origin individuals exhibit despite limited resources (p. 41). On page 11, in the first paragraph, the word “politics” was deleted so the first sentence now reads: I measure political context using three indicators: media language preference, importance of politics, and political party affiliation. V The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for the Study of Social Problems. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/socpro/article-abstract/65/1/135/3817192 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Problems Oxford University Press

Marching Toward Assimilation? The 2006 Immigrant Rights Marches and the Attitudes of Mexican Immigrants About Assimilation

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ou_press/marching-toward-assimilation-the-2006-immigrant-rights-marches-and-the-04x26hUzFQ
Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for the Study of Social Problems. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0037-7791
eISSN
1533-8533
D.O.I.
10.1093/socpro/spx013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Social Problems, 2018, 65, 135 doi: 10.1093/socpro/spx013 Advance Access Publication Date: 11 May 2017 Erratum ERRATUM Marching Toward Assimilation? The 2006 Immigrant Rights Marches and the Attitudes of Mexican Immigrants About Assimilation Lorena Castro Stanford University The following errors were discovered. These have been corrected in the original article. On page 2, in the first paragraph, typographical changes were made to the following sentence so that it now reads: How did the 2006 protests—the largest national protests since the Civil Rights Movement—shape the attitudes about assimilation of Mexican immigrants, the largest and most pol- itically contentious immigrant group? On page 5, a page reference was added to the following sentence: Zhou et al. (2008) suggest that relying solely on “objective” measures that presume middle-class whites as the reference group pro- duces an “incomplete portrait of the process of incorporation” and misses the exceptional intergen- erational mobility that Mexican-origin individuals exhibit despite limited resources (p. 41). On page 11, in the first paragraph, the word “politics” was deleted so the first sentence now reads: I measure political context using three indicators: media language preference, importance of politics, and political party affiliation. V The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for the Study of Social Problems. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/socpro/article-abstract/65/1/135/3817192 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

Journal

Social ProblemsOxford University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Access to DeepDyve database
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off