Low Normalized Grip Strength is a Biomarker for Cardiometabolic Disease and Physical Disabilities Among U.S. and Chinese Adults

Low Normalized Grip Strength is a Biomarker for Cardiometabolic Disease and Physical Disabilities... AbstractBackgroundEvidence highlights the importance of muscular strength as a protective factor for health and function across aging populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which low normalized grip strength (NGS) serves as a biomarker for both cardiometabolic disease and physical disability in U.S. and Chinese adults.MethodsMiddle aged and older adults from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012 and 2013–2014 combined surveys (n = 4,544), and the 2011 wave of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (n = 6,030) were included. Strength was assessed using a handgrip dynamometer, and was normalized to body mass. Weighted logistic regression models were used to assess the association between NGS and diabetes, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL-cholesterol, hypertension, and physical disability status, while controlling for age, sex, and sociodemographic characteristics.ResultsEvery 0.05 lower NGS was independently associated with a 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42–1.56) and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.11–1.23) odds for diabetes; a 1.46 (95% CI: 1.39–1.53) and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.07–1.15) odds of hyperglycemia; a 1.15 (95% CI: 1.07–1.25) and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.08–1.14) odds of hypertriglyceridemia; a 1.22 (95% CI: 1.17–1.27) and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.12–1.18) odds of low HDL-cholesterol; a 1.19 (95% CI: 1.14–1.24) and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07–1.14) odds of hypertension; and a 1.36 (95% CI: 1.29–1.42) and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.05–1.15) odds for physical disability status in U.S. and Chinese adults, respectively.ConclusionsNGS was robustly associated with both cardiometabolic disease risk and physical disabilities in U.S. and Chinese aging adults. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical Sciences Oxford University Press

Low Normalized Grip Strength is a Biomarker for Cardiometabolic Disease and Physical Disabilities Among U.S. and Chinese Adults

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
1079-5006
eISSN
1758-535X
D.O.I.
10.1093/gerona/glx031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractBackgroundEvidence highlights the importance of muscular strength as a protective factor for health and function across aging populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which low normalized grip strength (NGS) serves as a biomarker for both cardiometabolic disease and physical disability in U.S. and Chinese adults.MethodsMiddle aged and older adults from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012 and 2013–2014 combined surveys (n = 4,544), and the 2011 wave of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (n = 6,030) were included. Strength was assessed using a handgrip dynamometer, and was normalized to body mass. Weighted logistic regression models were used to assess the association between NGS and diabetes, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL-cholesterol, hypertension, and physical disability status, while controlling for age, sex, and sociodemographic characteristics.ResultsEvery 0.05 lower NGS was independently associated with a 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42–1.56) and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.11–1.23) odds for diabetes; a 1.46 (95% CI: 1.39–1.53) and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.07–1.15) odds of hyperglycemia; a 1.15 (95% CI: 1.07–1.25) and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.08–1.14) odds of hypertriglyceridemia; a 1.22 (95% CI: 1.17–1.27) and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.12–1.18) odds of low HDL-cholesterol; a 1.19 (95% CI: 1.14–1.24) and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07–1.14) odds of hypertension; and a 1.36 (95% CI: 1.29–1.42) and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.05–1.15) odds for physical disability status in U.S. and Chinese adults, respectively.ConclusionsNGS was robustly associated with both cardiometabolic disease risk and physical disabilities in U.S. and Chinese aging adults.

Journal

The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical SciencesOxford University Press

Published: Oct 12, 2017

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