Longitudinal Associations between Respiratory Infections and Asthma in Young Children

Longitudinal Associations between Respiratory Infections and Asthma in Young Children Abstract We examined temporal dependencies between repeated assessments of respiratory infections and asthma in children in the Leicester Respiratory Cohort, Leicestershire, UK. Asthma (doctor diagnosis, health care visits, wheeze frequency) and respiratory infections (cold duration and frequency, cough with colds, ear infections) in the previous 12 months were assessed repeatedly at ages 1, 4, and 6 years for children born between April 1996 and April 1997. We determined associations between contemporaneous and lagged measures of asthma and respiratory infections using structural equation modelling. In 1995 children, asthma was positively associated with contemporaneous infections. Asthma at age 6 was positively associated with asthma at age 4 (regression coefficient = 0.87; 95% CI 0.76, 0.97), but not with asthma at age 1 (-0.01; -0.14, 0.11). We found no evidence for direct protective effect of infections at age 1 on asthma either at age 4 (-0.20; -0.51, 0.10) or 6 (0.24; -0.04, 0.52). Adjusting for potential confounders did not qualitatively change those relationships. Our findings suggest that asthma at age 6 is directly influenced by asthma history and only indirectly if, at all, by earlier infection episodes. We found little support for a protective effect of preschool infections on asthma at early school age. Asthma in children – respiratory infections – longitudinal structural equation modelling The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journalpermissions@oup.com. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

Longitudinal Associations between Respiratory Infections and Asthma in Young Children

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/longitudinal-associations-between-respiratory-infections-and-asthma-in-PO0pinAPeg
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
ISSN
0002-9262
eISSN
1476-6256
D.O.I.
10.1093/aje/kwy053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract We examined temporal dependencies between repeated assessments of respiratory infections and asthma in children in the Leicester Respiratory Cohort, Leicestershire, UK. Asthma (doctor diagnosis, health care visits, wheeze frequency) and respiratory infections (cold duration and frequency, cough with colds, ear infections) in the previous 12 months were assessed repeatedly at ages 1, 4, and 6 years for children born between April 1996 and April 1997. We determined associations between contemporaneous and lagged measures of asthma and respiratory infections using structural equation modelling. In 1995 children, asthma was positively associated with contemporaneous infections. Asthma at age 6 was positively associated with asthma at age 4 (regression coefficient = 0.87; 95% CI 0.76, 0.97), but not with asthma at age 1 (-0.01; -0.14, 0.11). We found no evidence for direct protective effect of infections at age 1 on asthma either at age 4 (-0.20; -0.51, 0.10) or 6 (0.24; -0.04, 0.52). Adjusting for potential confounders did not qualitatively change those relationships. Our findings suggest that asthma at age 6 is directly influenced by asthma history and only indirectly if, at all, by earlier infection episodes. We found little support for a protective effect of preschool infections on asthma at early school age. Asthma in children – respiratory infections – longitudinal structural equation modelling The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journalpermissions@oup.com.

Journal

American Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: Mar 13, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off