Letter: The Prevalence of Burnout Among US Neurosurgery Residents

Letter: The Prevalence of Burnout Among US Neurosurgery Residents CORRESPONDENCE I would welcome comments from the authors regarding the Letter: The Prevalence of Burnout Among aforementioned issues to further strengthen the findings of this US Neurosurgery Residents important study. To the Editor: I read with great interest the article of Shakir et al in a Disclosure recent issue of the Neurosurgery. The authors performed a cross The authors have no personal, financial, or institutional interest in any of the sectional study to determine the prevalence of burnout among US drugs, materials, or devices described in this article. neurosurgery residents and concluded that neurosurgery residents have a significantly lower prevalence of burnout than other Gildasio De Oliveira, Jr, MD, MSCI, MBA residents/fellows and practicing physicians. The authors should Department of Anesthesiology be commended for addressing an important topic in medical The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Providence, 2,3 practice. In addition, the need to identify specific medical Rhode Island specialties associated with high burnout rates is an important 4,5 concept that needs to be further explored. REFERENCES Although the study of Shakir et al was well designed and 1. Shakir HJ, McPheeters MJ, Shallwani H, Pittari JE, Reynolds RM. The conducted, I have a few questions that need to be clarified. prevalence of burnout among US neurosurgery residents. Neurosurgery. 2017. doi: Burnout in residents has been highly associated with the number 10.1093/neuros/nyx494. [Published online ahead of print] of working hours per week. Since neurosurgery is particularly 2. De Oliveira GS, Jr. Biological evidence of the impact of burnout on the health of anesthesiologists. J Clin Anesth. 2017;41:62. known for having a very demanding working load, the findings 3. Bekelis K, Missios S, MacKenzie TA. Outcomes of elective cerebral aneurysm of a low rate of burnout detected by the authors is intriguing. treatment performed by attending neurosurgeons after night work. Neurosurgery. The low response rate presented by the authors strongly suggests 2018;82(3):329-334. the possibility of response bias. It is possible that residents who 4. Vinson AE, Zurakowski D, Randel GI, Schlecht KD. National survey of US academic anesthesiology chairs on clinician wellness. J Clin Anesth. 2016;34:623- were not burnout were much more willing to answer the survey than the ones who were burnout, and hence the authors’ results. 5. Gonzalez LS, Donnelly MJ. A survey of residency program directors in anesthesi- It would be important to evaluate the presence of response bias to ology regarding mentorship of residents. J Clin Anesth. 2016;33:254-265. establish the generalizability of the study results. I was concerned that the study of Shakir et al may not reflect the reality of neuro- 10.1093/neuros/nyy195 surgery residents in the United States. NEUROSURGERY VOLUME 0 | NUMBER 0 | 2018 | 1 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/neurosurgery/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/neuros/nyy195/4995092 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 11 July 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Letter: The Prevalence of Burnout Among US Neurosurgery Residents

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ou_press/letter-the-prevalence-of-burnout-among-us-neurosurgery-residents-tkmXTzupld
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1093/neuros/nyy195
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CORRESPONDENCE I would welcome comments from the authors regarding the Letter: The Prevalence of Burnout Among aforementioned issues to further strengthen the findings of this US Neurosurgery Residents important study. To the Editor: I read with great interest the article of Shakir et al in a Disclosure recent issue of the Neurosurgery. The authors performed a cross The authors have no personal, financial, or institutional interest in any of the sectional study to determine the prevalence of burnout among US drugs, materials, or devices described in this article. neurosurgery residents and concluded that neurosurgery residents have a significantly lower prevalence of burnout than other Gildasio De Oliveira, Jr, MD, MSCI, MBA residents/fellows and practicing physicians. The authors should Department of Anesthesiology be commended for addressing an important topic in medical The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Providence, 2,3 practice. In addition, the need to identify specific medical Rhode Island specialties associated with high burnout rates is an important 4,5 concept that needs to be further explored. REFERENCES Although the study of Shakir et al was well designed and 1. Shakir HJ, McPheeters MJ, Shallwani H, Pittari JE, Reynolds RM. The conducted, I have a few questions that need to be clarified. prevalence of burnout among US neurosurgery residents. Neurosurgery. 2017. doi: Burnout in residents has been highly associated with the number 10.1093/neuros/nyx494. [Published online ahead of print] of working hours per week. Since neurosurgery is particularly 2. De Oliveira GS, Jr. Biological evidence of the impact of burnout on the health of anesthesiologists. J Clin Anesth. 2017;41:62. known for having a very demanding working load, the findings 3. Bekelis K, Missios S, MacKenzie TA. Outcomes of elective cerebral aneurysm of a low rate of burnout detected by the authors is intriguing. treatment performed by attending neurosurgeons after night work. Neurosurgery. The low response rate presented by the authors strongly suggests 2018;82(3):329-334. the possibility of response bias. It is possible that residents who 4. Vinson AE, Zurakowski D, Randel GI, Schlecht KD. National survey of US academic anesthesiology chairs on clinician wellness. J Clin Anesth. 2016;34:623- were not burnout were much more willing to answer the survey than the ones who were burnout, and hence the authors’ results. 5. Gonzalez LS, Donnelly MJ. A survey of residency program directors in anesthesi- It would be important to evaluate the presence of response bias to ology regarding mentorship of residents. J Clin Anesth. 2016;33:254-265. establish the generalizability of the study results. I was concerned that the study of Shakir et al may not reflect the reality of neuro- 10.1093/neuros/nyy195 surgery residents in the United States. NEUROSURGERY VOLUME 0 | NUMBER 0 | 2018 | 1 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/neurosurgery/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/neuros/nyy195/4995092 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 11 July 2018

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: May 11, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off