Jasmonate signalling in regulation of rubber biosynthesis in laticifer cells of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.)

Jasmonate signalling in regulation of rubber biosynthesis in laticifer cells of rubber tree... Abstract Rubber trees are the major source of worldwide natural rubber. Rubber-containing latex is obtained from the laticifer cells of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) via regular tapping. However, little is known about the positive feedback regulation of rubber biosynthesis, a typical isoprenoid metabolic process in laticifer cells, by tapping-caused loss of latex. Here, we demonstrated the crucial role of jasmonate signalling in this feedback regulation. The endogenous jasmonate levels, the expression levels of rubber biosynthesis-related genes and the efficiency of in vitro rubber biosynthesis were significantly higher in laticifer cells of regularly tapped trees than those of virgin trees. Application of methyl jasmonate had similar effects to latex exploitation in up-regulating the rubber biosynthesis-related genes and enhancing rubber biosynthesis. The specific jasmonate signalling module (COI1-JAZ3-MYC2) in laticifer cells of rubber tree was further identified. Its activation was associated with the enhanced natural rubber biosynthesis via up-regulating the expression of a farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase gene and a small rubber particle protein gene. The increase in the corresponding proteins, especially the farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase likely contributes to the increased efficiency of rubber biosynthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first study to reveal a jasmonate signalling pathway in regulating rubber biosynthesis in laticifer cells. The identification of the specific jasmonate signalling module in laticifer cells of rubber tree may provide a clue for genetic improvement of rubber yield potential. Hevea brasiliensis Muell Arg, jasmonate signalling, laticifer cell, isoprenoid metabolism, rubber biosynthesis, secondary metabolism © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Botany Oxford University Press

Jasmonate signalling in regulation of rubber biosynthesis in laticifer cells of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/jasmonate-signalling-in-regulation-of-rubber-biosynthesis-in-laticifer-bztJcl0iZw
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0022-0957
eISSN
1460-2431
D.O.I.
10.1093/jxb/ery169
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Rubber trees are the major source of worldwide natural rubber. Rubber-containing latex is obtained from the laticifer cells of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) via regular tapping. However, little is known about the positive feedback regulation of rubber biosynthesis, a typical isoprenoid metabolic process in laticifer cells, by tapping-caused loss of latex. Here, we demonstrated the crucial role of jasmonate signalling in this feedback regulation. The endogenous jasmonate levels, the expression levels of rubber biosynthesis-related genes and the efficiency of in vitro rubber biosynthesis were significantly higher in laticifer cells of regularly tapped trees than those of virgin trees. Application of methyl jasmonate had similar effects to latex exploitation in up-regulating the rubber biosynthesis-related genes and enhancing rubber biosynthesis. The specific jasmonate signalling module (COI1-JAZ3-MYC2) in laticifer cells of rubber tree was further identified. Its activation was associated with the enhanced natural rubber biosynthesis via up-regulating the expression of a farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase gene and a small rubber particle protein gene. The increase in the corresponding proteins, especially the farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase likely contributes to the increased efficiency of rubber biosynthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first study to reveal a jasmonate signalling pathway in regulating rubber biosynthesis in laticifer cells. The identification of the specific jasmonate signalling module in laticifer cells of rubber tree may provide a clue for genetic improvement of rubber yield potential. Hevea brasiliensis Muell Arg, jasmonate signalling, laticifer cell, isoprenoid metabolism, rubber biosynthesis, secondary metabolism © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Journal of Experimental BotanyOxford University Press

Published: May 3, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off