Introduction to the Hot Topics in Aesthetic Surgery Supplement

Introduction to the Hot Topics in Aesthetic Surgery Supplement The Aesthetic Surgery Journal is pleased to publish a Supplement highlighting 4 presentations given at “Hot Topics” at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. It is important for the reader to understand what “Hot Topics” is, its origin, and why it is important to plastic surgeons, their patients, and the media. In 1999, Robert Singer (at that time President Elect of the Aesthetic Society Educational and Research Foundation [ASERF]) created the Emerging Trends Task Force that was cosponsored by ASERF and the then Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation (PSEF). “Good and bad ideas come from both noted and fringe plastic surgeons as well as from other specialties around the world. There needs to be a forum to discuss these innovations in a critical open manner and debunk myths. It would act as a reliable resource for ASAPS members, other plastic surgeons, our patients, the public and the media. Surgeons shouldn’t have to hear about newer options from their patients and the media first,” according to Singer. He went on to say, “Hot Topics was created to look critically at exciting new and possibly controversial devices and procedures that are developed and promoted around the world with moderators posing aggressive but polite questions to get valid information about safety and efficacy and debunk myths and sales hyperbole. It is supposed to elicit controversy and be very interactive with audience participation.” The first Hot Topics Course was held in 2000. Those in attendance read the following statement from the societies: Disclaimer: For the Plastic Surgeons, Media, and any FDA representatives in the audience: “Hot Topics” refers to the reports on new or emerging technologies or procedures in cosmetic plastic surgery. These “cutting edge” modalities have yet to be tested over time or through wide clinical experience and, therefore, are still of unproven value to cosmetic plastic surgeons and patients. While the technologies and procedures included in “Hot Topics” should generally be considered new or experimental, some may ultimately prove to be important breakthroughs. It is also possible that they will be shown to have little significance or may even be harmful. Therefore, the reporting, advertising, or clinical use of these unproven technologies or procedures should be conducted cautiously, responsibly, and with full disclosure of their unproven nature. ASERF and ASAPS neither advocate nor condemn any of the devices, procedures, or studies presented as Hot Topics. The Aesthetic Surgery Education Foundation and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery provide this forum to fulfill their missions of education and research in aesthetic plastic surgery. While those in attendance appreciated the disclaimer, we frankly didn’t care. We wanted to see what was going to be hot (or not) in the next year or two. It is interesting to pull the course agendas from Hot Topic Forums from years past. Topics presented early in the history of the course include botulinum toxin, hyaluronic acid fillers, stem cells and fat transfer, light-based treatments, and cryolipolysis. These devices and products have stood the test of time and have become mainstream in aesthetic medicine. Presentations and products that were overhyped and are long forgotten include mesotherapy, external ultrasound assisted liposuction (UAL), LifeStyle Lifts, and light-based treatments for repigmentation to treat hypopigmentation. While the course is now called ASERF’s Premier Global Hot Topics, and no longer cosponsored jointly (since 2014), its importance remains. The interactivity, passion, probing, and frank discussion are the hallmarks of the 4 to 6 hour event. There have been a number of individuals who have contributed significantly to the importance of this forum through the years making it one of the most attended on a yearly basis. In an era of direct to consumer marketing and hype without objective supporting data, it becomes increasing difficult to distinguish what is fact from fiction. So you be the judge, are these products here to stay? Finally, with this inaugural issue highlighting the presentations from last year’s Hot Topics, we want to thank those below for their hard work and pursuit of the truth and everyone who has presented and participated in this important “dialogue.” Session Co-Chairs and Moderators Leroy Young, MD Robert Singer, MD Rod Rohrich, MD William Adams, Jr, MD Joe Gryskiewicz, MD Brian Kinney, MD Richard D’Amico, MD Jamil Ahmad, MD Simeon Wall, Jr, MD Joao Sampaio Goes, MD Panelists and Frequent Presenters Steve Teitelbaum, MD Mark Jewell, MD Neal Reisman, MD Peter Fodor, MD Barry DiBernardo, MD Jason Pozner, MD Paul Lorenc, MD Disclosures The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this article. Funding The authors received no financial support for the research, authorship, and publication of this article. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aesthetic Surgery Journal Oxford University Press

Introduction to the Hot Topics in Aesthetic Surgery Supplement

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1090-820X
eISSN
1527-330X
D.O.I.
10.1093/asj/sjy041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Aesthetic Surgery Journal is pleased to publish a Supplement highlighting 4 presentations given at “Hot Topics” at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. It is important for the reader to understand what “Hot Topics” is, its origin, and why it is important to plastic surgeons, their patients, and the media. In 1999, Robert Singer (at that time President Elect of the Aesthetic Society Educational and Research Foundation [ASERF]) created the Emerging Trends Task Force that was cosponsored by ASERF and the then Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation (PSEF). “Good and bad ideas come from both noted and fringe plastic surgeons as well as from other specialties around the world. There needs to be a forum to discuss these innovations in a critical open manner and debunk myths. It would act as a reliable resource for ASAPS members, other plastic surgeons, our patients, the public and the media. Surgeons shouldn’t have to hear about newer options from their patients and the media first,” according to Singer. He went on to say, “Hot Topics was created to look critically at exciting new and possibly controversial devices and procedures that are developed and promoted around the world with moderators posing aggressive but polite questions to get valid information about safety and efficacy and debunk myths and sales hyperbole. It is supposed to elicit controversy and be very interactive with audience participation.” The first Hot Topics Course was held in 2000. Those in attendance read the following statement from the societies: Disclaimer: For the Plastic Surgeons, Media, and any FDA representatives in the audience: “Hot Topics” refers to the reports on new or emerging technologies or procedures in cosmetic plastic surgery. These “cutting edge” modalities have yet to be tested over time or through wide clinical experience and, therefore, are still of unproven value to cosmetic plastic surgeons and patients. While the technologies and procedures included in “Hot Topics” should generally be considered new or experimental, some may ultimately prove to be important breakthroughs. It is also possible that they will be shown to have little significance or may even be harmful. Therefore, the reporting, advertising, or clinical use of these unproven technologies or procedures should be conducted cautiously, responsibly, and with full disclosure of their unproven nature. ASERF and ASAPS neither advocate nor condemn any of the devices, procedures, or studies presented as Hot Topics. The Aesthetic Surgery Education Foundation and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery provide this forum to fulfill their missions of education and research in aesthetic plastic surgery. While those in attendance appreciated the disclaimer, we frankly didn’t care. We wanted to see what was going to be hot (or not) in the next year or two. It is interesting to pull the course agendas from Hot Topic Forums from years past. Topics presented early in the history of the course include botulinum toxin, hyaluronic acid fillers, stem cells and fat transfer, light-based treatments, and cryolipolysis. These devices and products have stood the test of time and have become mainstream in aesthetic medicine. Presentations and products that were overhyped and are long forgotten include mesotherapy, external ultrasound assisted liposuction (UAL), LifeStyle Lifts, and light-based treatments for repigmentation to treat hypopigmentation. While the course is now called ASERF’s Premier Global Hot Topics, and no longer cosponsored jointly (since 2014), its importance remains. The interactivity, passion, probing, and frank discussion are the hallmarks of the 4 to 6 hour event. There have been a number of individuals who have contributed significantly to the importance of this forum through the years making it one of the most attended on a yearly basis. In an era of direct to consumer marketing and hype without objective supporting data, it becomes increasing difficult to distinguish what is fact from fiction. So you be the judge, are these products here to stay? Finally, with this inaugural issue highlighting the presentations from last year’s Hot Topics, we want to thank those below for their hard work and pursuit of the truth and everyone who has presented and participated in this important “dialogue.” Session Co-Chairs and Moderators Leroy Young, MD Robert Singer, MD Rod Rohrich, MD William Adams, Jr, MD Joe Gryskiewicz, MD Brian Kinney, MD Richard D’Amico, MD Jamil Ahmad, MD Simeon Wall, Jr, MD Joao Sampaio Goes, MD Panelists and Frequent Presenters Steve Teitelbaum, MD Mark Jewell, MD Neal Reisman, MD Peter Fodor, MD Barry DiBernardo, MD Jason Pozner, MD Paul Lorenc, MD Disclosures The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this article. Funding The authors received no financial support for the research, authorship, and publication of this article. © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Aesthetic Surgery JournalOxford University Press

Published: May 15, 2018

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