Introducing a New Section: SoMe and Behavioral Science

Introducing a New Section: SoMe and Behavioral Science Everywhere we look lately, it seems people are accessing social media on one device or another, excitedly adopting the newest apps to remain connected. I’ve written about social media in our Journal, most recently in the context of stress factors. In the past two years, we’ve seen an increased volume of related submissions in which aesthetic surgeons evaluate return on investment, which apps are most reliable, primers for starting out, how residents engage Instagram, and the top 100 Twitter gurus to follow.1–6 Another trend is one we’ve been watching for the past several years: genital rejuvenation. We’ve also seen an increase in the complex nature of these articles as they address the psychology behind patients requesting specific procedures, both surgical and non-surgical. This has renewed interest in body dysmorphic disorder and related disorders research. Artificial intelligence and machine learning also fall into the psychologic sector as they relate to tools, mechanisms, and innovations that are already touching our daily lives and that promise to enhance research, accuracy, and outcomes. Interest in both of these topics—social media and genital rejuvenation—and its psychological implications—prompted us to publish Thematic Issues, collections of published articles our publishing partner Oxford University Press makes free-to-read for a set period of time on a hot topic theme. We’ve dubbed it one-stop-shopping on relevant topics. The overwhelming response to these collections confirmed our observations that now is the right time to launch a new section to highlight social media and psychologic aspects of plastic surgery to ensure we offer our readers focused content touching on all recent advances and innovations. We are pleased to launch the new section SoMe and Behavioral Science in this issue with Section Editors Jennifer Walden, MD (Austin, TX) and David Sarwer, PhD. We are fortunate to have two very accomplished Section Editors to oversee and grow this section, who offer their insights and vision for the new section. Dr. Walden will oversee the social media submissions and Dr. Sarwer will oversee the psychology-related submissions. “The Aesthetic Surgery Journal and ASAPS are leaders in the fields of social media and plastic surgery, and I am proud to be selected to work with Dr. David Sarwer on this new section. SoMe and Behavioral Science fills a gap among plastic surgery journals and offers authors a dedicated home for innovative articles. Through social media, doctors and patients connect, share information, and engage in life-changing conversations. As surgeons, we perform procedures on the body that directly affect the mind, self-esteem, and choices our patients make, including the confidence with which they present themselves on social media. I look forward to helping our new section evolve to meet our community’s growing needs and applaud ASJ for championing a “head to toe” approach to aesthetic surgery.” —Jennifer Walden, MD “I’m honored to serve with Dr. Walden as Co-Editor of this new section. I’ve served on the Editorial Board of the journal since 2010. We have seen a large increase in submissions from around the world of studies that have investigated the psychosocial aspects of aesthetic surgery. I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing articles often and Dr. Nahai also has asked me to write commentaries on the most impactful papers published in the area. Having a section dedicated to these studies, as well as those focused on issues related to social media, is a forward thinking decision. I’m thrilled to be part of it.” —David Sarwer, PhD Call for Papers In this issue you’ll see our Call for Papers announcement describing the type of social media and psychological articles appropriate for this section. We invite you to submit and be among the first to publish in this new ASJ section. Some of our currently accepted articles will be moved into SoMe and Behavioral Science, where applicable, since we have many articles already available ahead of print. I look forward to your feedback on our new section and as always, thank you for your continued support of ASJ. Disclosures The author declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this article. Funding The author received no financial support for the research, authorship, and publication of this article. REFERENCES 1. Nahai F . The stress factor of social media . Aesthet Surg J . 2018 ; 38 ( 6 ): 689 - 691 . 2. Gould DJ , Grant Stevens W , Nazarian S . A primer on social media for plastic surgeons: what do i need to know about social media and how can it help my practice ? Aesthet Surg J . 2017 ; 37 ( 5 ): 614 - 619 . 3. Dorfman RG , Vaca EE , Mahmood E , Fine NA , Schierle CF . Plastic surgery-related hashtag utilization on instagram: implications for education and marketing . Aesthet Surg J . 2018 ; 38 ( 3 ): 332 - 338 . 4. Gould DJ , Nazarian S . Social media return on investment: how much is it worth to my practice ? Aesthet Surg J . 2018 ; 38 ( 5 ): 565 - 574 . 5. Chandawarkar AA , Gould DJ , Stevens WG . Insta-grated plastic surgery residencies: the rise of social media use by trainees and responsible guidelines for use . Aesthet Surg J . 2018 . doi: https://doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjy055 . [Epub ahead of print] 6. Chandawarkar AA , Gould DJ , Grant Stevens W . The top 100 social media influencers in plastic surgery on Twitter: who should you be following ? Aesthet Surg J . 2018 ; 38 ( 8 ): 913 - 917 . © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aesthetic Surgery Journal Oxford University Press

Introducing a New Section: SoMe and Behavioral Science

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1090-820X
eISSN
1527-330X
D.O.I.
10.1093/asj/sjy140
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Everywhere we look lately, it seems people are accessing social media on one device or another, excitedly adopting the newest apps to remain connected. I’ve written about social media in our Journal, most recently in the context of stress factors. In the past two years, we’ve seen an increased volume of related submissions in which aesthetic surgeons evaluate return on investment, which apps are most reliable, primers for starting out, how residents engage Instagram, and the top 100 Twitter gurus to follow.1–6 Another trend is one we’ve been watching for the past several years: genital rejuvenation. We’ve also seen an increase in the complex nature of these articles as they address the psychology behind patients requesting specific procedures, both surgical and non-surgical. This has renewed interest in body dysmorphic disorder and related disorders research. Artificial intelligence and machine learning also fall into the psychologic sector as they relate to tools, mechanisms, and innovations that are already touching our daily lives and that promise to enhance research, accuracy, and outcomes. Interest in both of these topics—social media and genital rejuvenation—and its psychological implications—prompted us to publish Thematic Issues, collections of published articles our publishing partner Oxford University Press makes free-to-read for a set period of time on a hot topic theme. We’ve dubbed it one-stop-shopping on relevant topics. The overwhelming response to these collections confirmed our observations that now is the right time to launch a new section to highlight social media and psychologic aspects of plastic surgery to ensure we offer our readers focused content touching on all recent advances and innovations. We are pleased to launch the new section SoMe and Behavioral Science in this issue with Section Editors Jennifer Walden, MD (Austin, TX) and David Sarwer, PhD. We are fortunate to have two very accomplished Section Editors to oversee and grow this section, who offer their insights and vision for the new section. Dr. Walden will oversee the social media submissions and Dr. Sarwer will oversee the psychology-related submissions. “The Aesthetic Surgery Journal and ASAPS are leaders in the fields of social media and plastic surgery, and I am proud to be selected to work with Dr. David Sarwer on this new section. SoMe and Behavioral Science fills a gap among plastic surgery journals and offers authors a dedicated home for innovative articles. Through social media, doctors and patients connect, share information, and engage in life-changing conversations. As surgeons, we perform procedures on the body that directly affect the mind, self-esteem, and choices our patients make, including the confidence with which they present themselves on social media. I look forward to helping our new section evolve to meet our community’s growing needs and applaud ASJ for championing a “head to toe” approach to aesthetic surgery.” —Jennifer Walden, MD “I’m honored to serve with Dr. Walden as Co-Editor of this new section. I’ve served on the Editorial Board of the journal since 2010. We have seen a large increase in submissions from around the world of studies that have investigated the psychosocial aspects of aesthetic surgery. I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing articles often and Dr. Nahai also has asked me to write commentaries on the most impactful papers published in the area. Having a section dedicated to these studies, as well as those focused on issues related to social media, is a forward thinking decision. I’m thrilled to be part of it.” —David Sarwer, PhD Call for Papers In this issue you’ll see our Call for Papers announcement describing the type of social media and psychological articles appropriate for this section. We invite you to submit and be among the first to publish in this new ASJ section. Some of our currently accepted articles will be moved into SoMe and Behavioral Science, where applicable, since we have many articles already available ahead of print. I look forward to your feedback on our new section and as always, thank you for your continued support of ASJ. Disclosures The author declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this article. Funding The author received no financial support for the research, authorship, and publication of this article. REFERENCES 1. Nahai F . The stress factor of social media . Aesthet Surg J . 2018 ; 38 ( 6 ): 689 - 691 . 2. Gould DJ , Grant Stevens W , Nazarian S . A primer on social media for plastic surgeons: what do i need to know about social media and how can it help my practice ? Aesthet Surg J . 2017 ; 37 ( 5 ): 614 - 619 . 3. Dorfman RG , Vaca EE , Mahmood E , Fine NA , Schierle CF . Plastic surgery-related hashtag utilization on instagram: implications for education and marketing . Aesthet Surg J . 2018 ; 38 ( 3 ): 332 - 338 . 4. Gould DJ , Nazarian S . Social media return on investment: how much is it worth to my practice ? Aesthet Surg J . 2018 ; 38 ( 5 ): 565 - 574 . 5. Chandawarkar AA , Gould DJ , Stevens WG . Insta-grated plastic surgery residencies: the rise of social media use by trainees and responsible guidelines for use . Aesthet Surg J . 2018 . doi: https://doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjy055 . [Epub ahead of print] 6. Chandawarkar AA , Gould DJ , Grant Stevens W . The top 100 social media influencers in plastic surgery on Twitter: who should you be following ? Aesthet Surg J . 2018 ; 38 ( 8 ): 913 - 917 . © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Journal

Aesthetic Surgery JournalOxford University Press

Published: Jul 13, 2018

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