Interpreting in the Zone

Interpreting in the Zone Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 2018, 109 doi:10.1093/deafed/enx045 Book Review BOOK REVIEW Jack Hoza (2016). Interpreting in the Zone: How the Conscious and Unconscious Function in Interpreting. Washington, DC: Gallaudet Press. Hardback. $70. ISBN 978-1-56368-666-5. Author Dr. Jack Hoza draws on his lifelong experience in con- As I read through this volume, I realized that it is written for nection with the Deaf community, and on research in interpret- a broad audience of interpreters, interpreter educators, inter- ing and interpreting related fields, as he describes multiple preting researchers, and others interested in the interpreting aspects of the interpreting process and how it relates to cogni- field. While the topic may seem to be highly academic, the tive functions during interpretation. In Interpreting in the Zone, actual writing is presented in such a way that it will appeal to Dr. Hoza delves into what occurs consciously and uncon- many knowledge levels. Interpreters may read this book for me- sciously in the brains of interpreters using examples from two taknowledge of how they work, and how they can have more in of his own research studies. In one study he collected data from the zone experiences. Interpreter educators may use the many an online survey of 223 interpreters (varying certifications and sections of advice related to guiding novices and students on years of experience), and in the other he filmed and interviewed their own journey to the “zone.” Interpreting researchers will 12 interpreters. These interviewees included four novices (not find a comprehensive compilation of references and extensive nationally certified), four professionals (nationally certified for knowledge to use in doing further research. more than 15 years), and four selected interpreters (nationally Throughout the book the author has an obvious passion for certified and chosen by the Deaf community). In these studies providing culturally appropriate communication access for the he asked them questions on topics such as assignment prepara- Deaf community and those who engage with them, combined tion, their mental processes during interpretation, how they with experience and practical knowledge of the cognitive and have “aha!” moments in interpreting, and how they can tell if physical work and needs of interpreters. Dr. Hoza accomplishes an interpretation is successful. his goals of clearly describing the cognitive processes of inter- The book contains chapters on topics corresponding to how preters, providing practical ideas for coordinating these pro- the interpreters’ brains function during interpreting, differences cesses, guiding interpreters to enhance their capabilities, and in novices and experts, interpreter identity and attitudes, and proffering tips on how to be effective and caring in their work. the decision-making processes of interpreters. The chapters As a university professor and researcher, I will be using much begin by integrating prior research with practical knowledge on of the information in this book to further my own research on a topic, then proceed to apply that knowledge using the two how interpreters experience self-talk, and how we can thus studies he conducted. He does this all within a framework of teach interpreting students to deal with their own self-talk and focusing on when interpreters have an “in the zone” experience. cognitive processes. If you are involved in the interpreting field, This type of experience is one in which the interpreter finds a then I suggest getting this book and using it as a reference specific interpreting task enjoyable as they are highly satisfied guide in your interpreting related work. My own copy is full of with their work because they are sufficiently challenged and notations, aha! moments, highlights, and dog-eared pages, as I have the capability for the task. He contrasts being in the zone know I will return to it often in an effort to be “in the zone” in with being in the working zone (when interpreting is effective my interpreting related work. but combined with anxiety), being in the comfort zone (when interpreting is effective but combined with boredom), and with Laura Maddux being out of the zone (not being effective). Lamar University © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jdsde/article-abstract/23/1/109/4710334 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education Oxford University Press

Interpreting in the Zone

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
1081-4159
eISSN
1465-7325
D.O.I.
10.1093/deafed/enx045
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Abstract

Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 2018, 109 doi:10.1093/deafed/enx045 Book Review BOOK REVIEW Jack Hoza (2016). Interpreting in the Zone: How the Conscious and Unconscious Function in Interpreting. Washington, DC: Gallaudet Press. Hardback. $70. ISBN 978-1-56368-666-5. Author Dr. Jack Hoza draws on his lifelong experience in con- As I read through this volume, I realized that it is written for nection with the Deaf community, and on research in interpret- a broad audience of interpreters, interpreter educators, inter- ing and interpreting related fields, as he describes multiple preting researchers, and others interested in the interpreting aspects of the interpreting process and how it relates to cogni- field. While the topic may seem to be highly academic, the tive functions during interpretation. In Interpreting in the Zone, actual writing is presented in such a way that it will appeal to Dr. Hoza delves into what occurs consciously and uncon- many knowledge levels. Interpreters may read this book for me- sciously in the brains of interpreters using examples from two taknowledge of how they work, and how they can have more in of his own research studies. In one study he collected data from the zone experiences. Interpreter educators may use the many an online survey of 223 interpreters (varying certifications and sections of advice related to guiding novices and students on years of experience), and in the other he filmed and interviewed their own journey to the “zone.” Interpreting researchers will 12 interpreters. These interviewees included four novices (not find a comprehensive compilation of references and extensive nationally certified), four professionals (nationally certified for knowledge to use in doing further research. more than 15 years), and four selected interpreters (nationally Throughout the book the author has an obvious passion for certified and chosen by the Deaf community). In these studies providing culturally appropriate communication access for the he asked them questions on topics such as assignment prepara- Deaf community and those who engage with them, combined tion, their mental processes during interpretation, how they with experience and practical knowledge of the cognitive and have “aha!” moments in interpreting, and how they can tell if physical work and needs of interpreters. Dr. Hoza accomplishes an interpretation is successful. his goals of clearly describing the cognitive processes of inter- The book contains chapters on topics corresponding to how preters, providing practical ideas for coordinating these pro- the interpreters’ brains function during interpreting, differences cesses, guiding interpreters to enhance their capabilities, and in novices and experts, interpreter identity and attitudes, and proffering tips on how to be effective and caring in their work. the decision-making processes of interpreters. The chapters As a university professor and researcher, I will be using much begin by integrating prior research with practical knowledge on of the information in this book to further my own research on a topic, then proceed to apply that knowledge using the two how interpreters experience self-talk, and how we can thus studies he conducted. He does this all within a framework of teach interpreting students to deal with their own self-talk and focusing on when interpreters have an “in the zone” experience. cognitive processes. If you are involved in the interpreting field, This type of experience is one in which the interpreter finds a then I suggest getting this book and using it as a reference specific interpreting task enjoyable as they are highly satisfied guide in your interpreting related work. My own copy is full of with their work because they are sufficiently challenged and notations, aha! moments, highlights, and dog-eared pages, as I have the capability for the task. He contrasts being in the zone know I will return to it often in an effort to be “in the zone” in with being in the working zone (when interpreting is effective my interpreting related work. but combined with anxiety), being in the comfort zone (when interpreting is effective but combined with boredom), and with Laura Maddux being out of the zone (not being effective). Lamar University © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jdsde/article-abstract/23/1/109/4710334 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

Journal

The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf EducationOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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