In Vivo Rat Closed Spinal Window for Spinal Microcirculation: Observation of Pial Vessels, Leukocyte Adhesion, and Red Blood Cell Velocity

In Vivo Rat Closed Spinal Window for Spinal Microcirculation: Observation of Pial Vessels,... AbstractOBJECTIVES:An in vivo closed spinal window technique in rats was designed for observing the spinal microcirculation, such as the change of vessel diameter, leukocyte adhesion, and red blood cell (RBC) velocity, which has been very rarely examined in vivo in the spinal cord.METHODS:We made a very precise closed spinal window with a laminectomy at the C5 level using a dental acrylic resin and a cover glass (7 mm in diameter). Through this closed window, the dorsal surface of the rat cervical cord was observed with a video microscope, and the fluorescent images of rhodamine 6G-labeled leukocytes and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled RBCs were recorded and analyzed with a silicon-intensified target tube camera (30 frames/s) and an image-intensified high-speed video camera system (1000 frames/s).RESULTS:During C02 inhalation, the pial arterioles responded with vasodilation of 12.4 ± 10.4% (P < 0.01) in 11 arterioles of seven rats. The adhering leukocytes significantly increased in 41 venular segments of seven rats after superfusion of the neutrophil chemoattractant, N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine solution for 15 minutes (P < 0.001) but not after superfusion of only artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 15 minutes. During these experiments, no adhering leukocyte was seen in the pial arterioles. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled RBCs look like shooting stars in arterioles with silicon-intensified target tube camera processing at 30 frames per second, but individual fluorescein isotbiocyanate-labeled RBCs could be recognized frame by frame with the image-intensified high-speed video camera system. In 13 arterioles of four rats, the RBC velocity was 5.3 ± 2.0 mm per second.CONCLUSION:This closed spinal window technique in rats is available and applicable for the study of the spinal microcirculation, such as the pathophysiology of a secondary injury. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

In Vivo Rat Closed Spinal Window for Spinal Microcirculation: Observation of Pial Vessels, Leukocyte Adhesion, and Red Blood Cell Velocity

In Vivo Rat Closed Spinal Window for Spinal Microcirculation: Observation of Pial Vessels, Leukocyte Adhesion, and Red Blood Cell Velocity

In Vivo Rat Closed Spinal Window for Spinal Microcirculation: Observation of Pial Vessels, Leukocyte Adhesion, and Red Blood Cell Velocity m Mami Ishikawa, M .D ., Eiichi Sekizuka, M .D ., Shuzo Sato, M .D ., Noriyuki Yamaguchi, M .D ., Katsuyoshi Shimizu, M .D ., Kazuo Kobayashi, M .D ., Helmut Bertalanffy, M .D ., Takeshi Kawase, M .D . Departments of Neurosurgery (Ml, KK) and Internal M edicine (ES), Saitama National Hospital, Saitama, Japan; Department of Neurosurgery (SS, N Y, KS, TK), School of M edicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; and Department of Neurosurgery (HB), Philipps University Hospital, Marburg, G erm an y O B JEC TIV ES: An in vivo closed spinal window technique in rats was designed for observing the spinal microcircu­ lation, such as the change of vessel diameter, leukocyte adhesion, and red blood cell (RBC) velocity, which has been very rarely examined in vivo in the spinal cord. M E T H O D S : W e made a very precise closed spinal window with a laminectomy at the C5 level using a dental acrylic resin and a cover glass (7 mm in diameter). Through this closed window, the dorsal surface of the rat cervical cord was observed with a video microscope, and the fluorescent images of rhodamine 6G-labeled leukocytes and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled RBCs were recorded and analyzed with a silicon-intensified target tube camera (30 frames/s) and an image-intensified high-speed video camera system (1000 frames/s). RESULTS: During C 0 2 inhalation, the pial arterioles responded with vasodilation of 12.4 ± 1 0 .4 % (P < 0.01) in 11 arterioles of seven rats. The adhering leukocytes significantly increased in 41 venular segments of seven rats after superfusion of the neutrophil chemoattractant, /V-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine solution for 15 min­ utes (P < 0.001) but not after superfusion of only artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 15 minutes. During these experiments, no adhering leukocyte was seen in the pial...
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Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199901000-00096
Publisher site
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Abstract

AbstractOBJECTIVES:An in vivo closed spinal window technique in rats was designed for observing the spinal microcirculation, such as the change of vessel diameter, leukocyte adhesion, and red blood cell (RBC) velocity, which has been very rarely examined in vivo in the spinal cord.METHODS:We made a very precise closed spinal window with a laminectomy at the C5 level using a dental acrylic resin and a cover glass (7 mm in diameter). Through this closed window, the dorsal surface of the rat cervical cord was observed with a video microscope, and the fluorescent images of rhodamine 6G-labeled leukocytes and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled RBCs were recorded and analyzed with a silicon-intensified target tube camera (30 frames/s) and an image-intensified high-speed video camera system (1000 frames/s).RESULTS:During C02 inhalation, the pial arterioles responded with vasodilation of 12.4 ± 10.4% (P < 0.01) in 11 arterioles of seven rats. The adhering leukocytes significantly increased in 41 venular segments of seven rats after superfusion of the neutrophil chemoattractant, N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine solution for 15 minutes (P < 0.001) but not after superfusion of only artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 15 minutes. During these experiments, no adhering leukocyte was seen in the pial arterioles. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled RBCs look like shooting stars in arterioles with silicon-intensified target tube camera processing at 30 frames per second, but individual fluorescein isotbiocyanate-labeled RBCs could be recognized frame by frame with the image-intensified high-speed video camera system. In 13 arterioles of four rats, the RBC velocity was 5.3 ± 2.0 mm per second.CONCLUSION:This closed spinal window technique in rats is available and applicable for the study of the spinal microcirculation, such as the pathophysiology of a secondary injury.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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