In this issue of Occupational Medicine

In this issue of Occupational Medicine Occupational Medicine 2018;68:1 doi:10.1093/occmed/kqy004 With an increasingly diverse labour force and rapidly of such organizations in the private sector. OH profes- changing work environments, understanding the bi- sionals are often asked to see employees at the behest directional relationship between work and health is as of the employer and thus are often party to unique important as ever. The adverse effects of shift and night information unavailable to other medical professionals. work have received significant attention in recent years. Accordingly, they have an important role in the voca- Aside from an increased risk of involvement in accidents, tional rehabilitation. there are concerns about the development of early car- The role of emergency responders in traumatic diovascular disease and certain cancers. Practical rec- events has received much interest in recent years. Such ommendations, however, about how to address these events may include chemical, biological, radiological difficulties seem lacking. In this issue, McElvenny et  al. and nuclear attacks (CBRN) and terrorist incidents [1] discuss the evidence base supporting the association but also ‘natural events’ such as fires, floods and earth- between shift work and cancer and describe some prac- quakes. Several countries have introduced dedicated tical workplace interventions that may be introduced units to assess CBRN risks and terrorist threats, with to positively modify this risk at organizational and many organizations at local levels having developed individual level. emergency action plans for such instances. Wesemann The occupational management of chronic diseases et  al. [4] identified gender and occupation-specific dif- poses an on-going challenge, and safely integrating such ferences in health symptoms, behaviours and quality individuals into the modern workplace merits study. of life across 37 emergency responders to the terrorist Although this challenge has been recognized at inter- attack in Berlin in 2016, suggesting scope to tailor inter- national, national and local levels through a myriad of ventions accordingly. policies and initiatives, less is known about the reciprocal Finally, a new section of this journal is dedicated to relationship—that of the value that such individuals place ‘How to Do It’, providing descriptions and instructions on their work. Vooijs et al. [2] surveyed members of three on how to perform practical OH tasks. The first article in Dutch patient federations identifying the positive role of this series covers the Chester Step Test. We hope this is a financial stability, social contact and a sense of contribu- valuable addition to this journal and will be appreciated tion that work brings to those with chronic diseases. by our readers. Occupational health (OH) professionals are well Subhashis Basu placed to facilitate the integration of individuals back Assistant Editor into the workforce after or even during periods of serious illness, or in providing advice about new employment for those who may not be suited to their previous role for References health reasons. The role of such vocational rehabilitation in reducing the ‘disability employment gap’ is discussed 1. McElvenny DM, Crawford JO, Cherrie JW. What should we tell shift workers to do to reduce their cancer risk? by Frank [3]. The importance for those working in the Occup Med (Lond) 2018;68:5–7. field to understand the enabling factors or barriers to 2. Vooijs M, Leensen MCJ, Hoving JL, Wind H, Frings- disabled individuals obtaining and successfully engag- Dresen MHW. Value of work for employees with a chronic ing with work is emphasized. These include relevant past disease. Occup Med (Lond) 2018;68:26–31. and current health issues, occupational factors such as 3. Frank A. Navigating the health–work interface— vocational the individual’s work experience and skill-base as well rehabilitation in the UK. Occup Med (Lond) 2018;68:2–4. as the approach taken by the employer towards disa- 4. Wesemann U, Zimmermann P, Mahnke M, Butler O, bled workers in policy and practice. The dearth of voca- Polk S, Willmund G. Burdens on emergency respond- tional rehabilitation resources in the National Health ers after a terrorist attack in Berlin. Occup Med (Lond) Service is highlighted, with a recognition of a growth 2018;68:60–63. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/occmed/article-abstract/68/1/1/4866358 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Occupational Medicine Oxford University Press

In this issue of Occupational Medicine

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Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
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0962-7480
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1471-8405
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10.1093/occmed/kqy004
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Abstract

Occupational Medicine 2018;68:1 doi:10.1093/occmed/kqy004 With an increasingly diverse labour force and rapidly of such organizations in the private sector. OH profes- changing work environments, understanding the bi- sionals are often asked to see employees at the behest directional relationship between work and health is as of the employer and thus are often party to unique important as ever. The adverse effects of shift and night information unavailable to other medical professionals. work have received significant attention in recent years. Accordingly, they have an important role in the voca- Aside from an increased risk of involvement in accidents, tional rehabilitation. there are concerns about the development of early car- The role of emergency responders in traumatic diovascular disease and certain cancers. Practical rec- events has received much interest in recent years. Such ommendations, however, about how to address these events may include chemical, biological, radiological difficulties seem lacking. In this issue, McElvenny et  al. and nuclear attacks (CBRN) and terrorist incidents [1] discuss the evidence base supporting the association but also ‘natural events’ such as fires, floods and earth- between shift work and cancer and describe some prac- quakes. Several countries have introduced dedicated tical workplace interventions that may be introduced units to assess CBRN risks and terrorist threats, with to positively modify this risk at organizational and many organizations at local levels having developed individual level. emergency action plans for such instances. Wesemann The occupational management of chronic diseases et  al. [4] identified gender and occupation-specific dif- poses an on-going challenge, and safely integrating such ferences in health symptoms, behaviours and quality individuals into the modern workplace merits study. of life across 37 emergency responders to the terrorist Although this challenge has been recognized at inter- attack in Berlin in 2016, suggesting scope to tailor inter- national, national and local levels through a myriad of ventions accordingly. policies and initiatives, less is known about the reciprocal Finally, a new section of this journal is dedicated to relationship—that of the value that such individuals place ‘How to Do It’, providing descriptions and instructions on their work. Vooijs et al. [2] surveyed members of three on how to perform practical OH tasks. The first article in Dutch patient federations identifying the positive role of this series covers the Chester Step Test. We hope this is a financial stability, social contact and a sense of contribu- valuable addition to this journal and will be appreciated tion that work brings to those with chronic diseases. by our readers. Occupational health (OH) professionals are well Subhashis Basu placed to facilitate the integration of individuals back Assistant Editor into the workforce after or even during periods of serious illness, or in providing advice about new employment for those who may not be suited to their previous role for References health reasons. The role of such vocational rehabilitation in reducing the ‘disability employment gap’ is discussed 1. McElvenny DM, Crawford JO, Cherrie JW. What should we tell shift workers to do to reduce their cancer risk? by Frank [3]. The importance for those working in the Occup Med (Lond) 2018;68:5–7. field to understand the enabling factors or barriers to 2. Vooijs M, Leensen MCJ, Hoving JL, Wind H, Frings- disabled individuals obtaining and successfully engag- Dresen MHW. Value of work for employees with a chronic ing with work is emphasized. These include relevant past disease. Occup Med (Lond) 2018;68:26–31. and current health issues, occupational factors such as 3. Frank A. Navigating the health–work interface— vocational the individual’s work experience and skill-base as well rehabilitation in the UK. Occup Med (Lond) 2018;68:2–4. as the approach taken by the employer towards disa- 4. Wesemann U, Zimmermann P, Mahnke M, Butler O, bled workers in policy and practice. The dearth of voca- Polk S, Willmund G. Burdens on emergency respond- tional rehabilitation resources in the National Health ers after a terrorist attack in Berlin. Occup Med (Lond) Service is highlighted, with a recognition of a growth 2018;68:60–63. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/occmed/article-abstract/68/1/1/4866358 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

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Occupational MedicineOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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