Identifying barriers to HIV testing in hospital admissions to improve HIV testing

Identifying barriers to HIV testing in hospital admissions to improve HIV testing Journal of Public Health | p. 1 Correspondence Identifying barriers to HIV testing in hospital admissions Overall clinical teams believe that HIV testing is a good idea to improve HIV testing and does not interfere with the provision of regular healthcare services. It is concerning that some healthcare workers believe In response to: Murthy L, Richardson J, Rowark A, that patients will be offended by being offered a test as there is Wasielewska. NICE public health guidance update. no evidence for this and we have shown that patients often J Public Health 2017;39(3):647–649 believe they are being tested anyway. However, the clinical Murthy et al. have highlighted recent NICE guidance on HIV teams offering tests need more information on what pre and testing in geographical areas of high prevalence. Locally, we post-test discussion is required and how patients receive results. have an extremely high prevalence of HIV (>8:1000). The We have shown before that barriers to HIV testing are all British Association of Sexual Health & HIV, The British HIV healthcare workers barriers rather than patient barriers and Association and NICE recommend routine HIV testing in it is important to continue challenging these to increase HIV 1,2 medical admissions in areas of high prevalence. We wanted testing rates. to identify current practices and knowledge of HIV testing in our large acute urban hospital trust amongst staff working in References acute admissions to identify barriers to testing 1 Murthy L, Richardson J, Rowark S, Wasielewska A. NICE public An electronic survey of clinical staff was distributed via email health guidance update. J Public Health 2017;39(3):647–649. and the hospital trust website in January 2017. A total of 42 2 UK National Guidelines for HIV Testing 2008: http://www.bhiva. responses were collected from 21/42 (50%) nurses, 6/42 (17%) org/documents/Guidelines/Testing/GlinesHIVTest08.pdf (23 February medical staff and 15/42 (36%) other staff. The 33/42 of 2018, date last accessed). responses were from non-traditional settings (non-sexual health, 3 Dowson L, Kober K, Perry N, Fisher MJ, Richardson D. Why do non-infectious diseases). And 39/42 (93%) agreed that HIV MSM present late for HIV testing: a qualitative study. AIDS Care testing should be part of regular healthcare and most (32/42 2012;24(2):204–209. (76%)) agreed that offering HIV tests does not interfere with 4 Mody N, Perry N, Richardson D, Barbour L, Fisher MJ. HIV testing other healthcare services and (24/42 (57%)) that they have the in acute general medicine. HIV Med 2016;17:634. resources to perform a test 30/42 (75%) feel comfortable in 1 1 1 discussing HIV with patients and 20/42 (71%) feel comfortable Martin Weber , Afra Barrett , Fionnuala Finnerty , 1,2 in offering and performing an HIV test. In total, 18/42(43%) Daniel Richardson said they believed patients would be offended by being offered Brighton & Sussex University NHS Trust, Brighton, UK an HIV test. And 14/42 (34%) do not think that patients Brighton & Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK receive adequate pre-test information, while 20/42 (48%) said patients are not receiving adequate post-test information. And Address correspondence to Daniel Richardson, 17/42 (41%) do not know if test results are being given in an E-mail: daniel.richardson@bsuh.nhs.uk appropriate and confidential manner to patients. doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdy051 © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com 1 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jpubhealth/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/pubmed/fdy051/4953710 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 08 June 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Public Health Oxford University Press

Identifying barriers to HIV testing in hospital admissions to improve HIV testing

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ou_press/identifying-barriers-to-hiv-testing-in-hospital-admissions-to-improve-W7ctESRhow
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1741-3842
eISSN
1741-3850
D.O.I.
10.1093/pubmed/fdy051
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Public Health | p. 1 Correspondence Identifying barriers to HIV testing in hospital admissions Overall clinical teams believe that HIV testing is a good idea to improve HIV testing and does not interfere with the provision of regular healthcare services. It is concerning that some healthcare workers believe In response to: Murthy L, Richardson J, Rowark A, that patients will be offended by being offered a test as there is Wasielewska. NICE public health guidance update. no evidence for this and we have shown that patients often J Public Health 2017;39(3):647–649 believe they are being tested anyway. However, the clinical Murthy et al. have highlighted recent NICE guidance on HIV teams offering tests need more information on what pre and testing in geographical areas of high prevalence. Locally, we post-test discussion is required and how patients receive results. have an extremely high prevalence of HIV (>8:1000). The We have shown before that barriers to HIV testing are all British Association of Sexual Health & HIV, The British HIV healthcare workers barriers rather than patient barriers and Association and NICE recommend routine HIV testing in it is important to continue challenging these to increase HIV 1,2 medical admissions in areas of high prevalence. We wanted testing rates. to identify current practices and knowledge of HIV testing in our large acute urban hospital trust amongst staff working in References acute admissions to identify barriers to testing 1 Murthy L, Richardson J, Rowark S, Wasielewska A. NICE public An electronic survey of clinical staff was distributed via email health guidance update. J Public Health 2017;39(3):647–649. and the hospital trust website in January 2017. A total of 42 2 UK National Guidelines for HIV Testing 2008: http://www.bhiva. responses were collected from 21/42 (50%) nurses, 6/42 (17%) org/documents/Guidelines/Testing/GlinesHIVTest08.pdf (23 February medical staff and 15/42 (36%) other staff. The 33/42 of 2018, date last accessed). responses were from non-traditional settings (non-sexual health, 3 Dowson L, Kober K, Perry N, Fisher MJ, Richardson D. Why do non-infectious diseases). And 39/42 (93%) agreed that HIV MSM present late for HIV testing: a qualitative study. AIDS Care testing should be part of regular healthcare and most (32/42 2012;24(2):204–209. (76%)) agreed that offering HIV tests does not interfere with 4 Mody N, Perry N, Richardson D, Barbour L, Fisher MJ. HIV testing other healthcare services and (24/42 (57%)) that they have the in acute general medicine. HIV Med 2016;17:634. resources to perform a test 30/42 (75%) feel comfortable in 1 1 1 discussing HIV with patients and 20/42 (71%) feel comfortable Martin Weber , Afra Barrett , Fionnuala Finnerty , 1,2 in offering and performing an HIV test. In total, 18/42(43%) Daniel Richardson said they believed patients would be offended by being offered Brighton & Sussex University NHS Trust, Brighton, UK an HIV test. And 14/42 (34%) do not think that patients Brighton & Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK receive adequate pre-test information, while 20/42 (48%) said patients are not receiving adequate post-test information. And Address correspondence to Daniel Richardson, 17/42 (41%) do not know if test results are being given in an E-mail: daniel.richardson@bsuh.nhs.uk appropriate and confidential manner to patients. doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdy051 © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com 1 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jpubhealth/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/pubmed/fdy051/4953710 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 08 June 2018

Journal

Journal of Public HealthOxford University Press

Published: Mar 26, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off