Hypoglycemia after Gastric Bypass Surgery: Current Concepts and Controversies

Hypoglycemia after Gastric Bypass Surgery: Current Concepts and Controversies Abstract Context Hypoglycemia occurring after bariatric and other forms of upper gastrointestinal surgery is increasingly encountered by clinical endocrinologists. The true frequency of this condition remains uncertain, due in part to differences in the diagnostic criteria and in the affected populations, as well as relative lack of patient and physician awareness and understanding of this condition. Post-bariatric hypoglycemia (PBH) can be severe and disabling for some patients, with neuroglycopenia (altered cognition, seizures, and loss of consciousness) leading to falls, motor vehicle accidents, and job and income loss. Moreover, repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can result in hypoglycemia unawareness, further impairing safety and requiring the assistance of others to treat hypoglycemia. Evidence Acquisition In this review, we summarize and integrate data from studies of patients affected by hypoglycemia after roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, obtained from both PubMed searches (1990-2017) and reference searches of relevant retrieved articles. While hypoglycemia can also be observed following sleeve gastrectomy and fundoplication, this review is focused on post-RYGB given the greater body of published clinical studies at present. Evidence Synthesis Data addressing specific aspects of diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment were reviewed by the authors; when not available, the authors have provided opinions based on clinical experience with this challenging condition. Conclusions Hypoglycemia occurring after gastric bypass surgery is challenging for patients and physicians alike. This review provides a systematic approach to diagnosis and treatment based on the underlying pathophysiology. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Oxford University Press

Hypoglycemia after Gastric Bypass Surgery: Current Concepts and Controversies

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/hypoglycemia-after-gastric-bypass-surgery-current-concepts-and-07gruWZEyC
Publisher
Endocrine Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society
ISSN
0021-972X
eISSN
1945-7197
D.O.I.
10.1210/jc.2018-00528
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Context Hypoglycemia occurring after bariatric and other forms of upper gastrointestinal surgery is increasingly encountered by clinical endocrinologists. The true frequency of this condition remains uncertain, due in part to differences in the diagnostic criteria and in the affected populations, as well as relative lack of patient and physician awareness and understanding of this condition. Post-bariatric hypoglycemia (PBH) can be severe and disabling for some patients, with neuroglycopenia (altered cognition, seizures, and loss of consciousness) leading to falls, motor vehicle accidents, and job and income loss. Moreover, repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can result in hypoglycemia unawareness, further impairing safety and requiring the assistance of others to treat hypoglycemia. Evidence Acquisition In this review, we summarize and integrate data from studies of patients affected by hypoglycemia after roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, obtained from both PubMed searches (1990-2017) and reference searches of relevant retrieved articles. While hypoglycemia can also be observed following sleeve gastrectomy and fundoplication, this review is focused on post-RYGB given the greater body of published clinical studies at present. Evidence Synthesis Data addressing specific aspects of diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment were reviewed by the authors; when not available, the authors have provided opinions based on clinical experience with this challenging condition. Conclusions Hypoglycemia occurring after gastric bypass surgery is challenging for patients and physicians alike. This review provides a systematic approach to diagnosis and treatment based on the underlying pathophysiology. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society

Journal

Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and MetabolismOxford University Press

Published: May 4, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off