Hydrogen tracks Fermi bubbles

Hydrogen tracks Fermi bubbles NEWS Water and SpaceX sends Starman into the headlines organics found SPACEFLIGHT SpaceX’s successful first Falcon Heavy launch on 6 in meteorites February not only tested the tech­ nology needed to achieve and CHEMISTRY Two meteorites that surpass Earth orbit, but also sent reached Earth separately in 1998 a bright red sports car into an hold traces of liquid water and elliptical orbit stretching beyond organic compounds including the orbit of Mars – and into the hydrocarbons and amino acids, news worldwide. trapped within tiny salt crystals. The Falcon Heavy rocket is the The meteorites hit the ground most powerful launch vehicle in Texas and Morocco; they were since the Saturn V, able to lift preserved at NASA’s Johnson 64 tonnes to orbit. It is part of Space Centre in Texas, making commercial enterprise SpaceX’s possible the delicate job of teasing programme to launch rockets out the crystals and analysing the capable of exploring to the Moon, contents of the u fl id inclusions. Mars and beyond. The Falcon Queenie Chan, a planetary sci­ Heavy first stage used three of The two side boosters from the Falcon Heavy land together. (SpaceX) entist at the Open University who the reusable SpaceX Falcon 9 was the study’s lead author, said: modules. Two of the rockets company’s sleek space suits in ephemerides from NASA’s Jet “This is the first time we have detached from the central one a relaxed pose at the wheel, the Propulsion Laboratory at the found abundant organic matter and landed back at Cape Canav­ car provided spectacular images. HORIZONS web interface. Mod­ also associated with liquid water eral, almost simultaneously; Like Voyager before it, the car is elling by Hanno Rein of the Uni­ that is really crucial to the origin the third crashed into the sea. loaded with cultural references: versity Toronto at Scarborough of life and the origin of complex The second stage provided the the words “Don’t panic” on the and colleagues (published on organic compounds in space.” acceleration that took the rocket dashboard, “Made on Earth the ArXiv) indicate that the Tesla The same process responsible for payload into – then out of – geo­ by humans” printed on circuit will have a dynamical lifetime trapping these compounds may synchronous Earth orbit. boards, Isaac Asimov’s Founda- of a few tens of millions of years also trap life or biomolecules in The payload was a red sports tion novels in electronic form and and that the chances of a collision the same way in other meteorites car, a Tesla Roadster owned by David Bowie’s song Space Oddity with the Earth in the next million or in planetary environments. SpaceX founder Elon Musk. With playing on repeat. years are 6%. Chan et al. published their the top down and a dummy Observers wishing to track TESLA LIFETIME http://bit.ly/2ovyE82 work in Science Advances. called Starman in one of the the Roadster can do so using HORIZONS http://go.nasa.gov/1QdKGr6 http://bit.ly/2EZHDbU NEW FELLOWS The following have been Albans Cambridge GALACTIC EVOLUTION Clouds of put forward to Council Richard Grimes, Charles Reynolds, Newport for election as a Fellow of Aberystwyth neutral hydrogen provide mark­ Javier Rosales, London the RAS: Jacqueline Gruhn, London ers for the o fl w of superheated David Ross, Southsea Omakshi Agiwal, London John Hope, Bath James Salmon, London gas into the Fermi bubbles, above Sakir Ahmed, Kingston Maya Horton, Hatfield Josephine Seed, Teleford and below the plane of the Milky Upon Thames Marvin W Huddleston, Aurora Sicilia-Aguilar, Way. They show the energetic Stefano Akram, London Mesquite, USA Dundee o fl w of gas in a fountain from the Matthew Allcock, Chris Joly, London Jesper Skottfelt, Milton Rossendale galactic centre, moving upwards Keynes Aaron Jones, Edgbaston Alexander Bader, Lancaster and outwards. Nuria Jordana, Bath Ashley Spindler, Irene Barbeito, Surbiton Farnborough These giant regions of super­ Sofia Kalamatianou , Joe Bentley, Birmingham Candice Tait, London London heated gas were discovered by Kristan Boyett, Oxford Hongming Tang, David Keitel, Glasgow NASA’s Fermi Gamma­ ray Space The hydrogen clouds spread into Melissa Brobby, Gravesend Manchester Tom Kimpson, Dorking Telescope; they seem to arise intergalactic space in this artist’s Jonathan Carrick, Lancaster Matthew Temple, Gerald Leung, Glasgow from a hot cosmic wind from the impression; how far they spread from Cambridge Andre Chicrala, Newcastle Andrew Levan, Coventry galactic centre, but the million­ our galaxy is unknown. (S Brunier/ Jeffrey Thompson , Dave Choi, Kowloon, Hong Christopher Lorch, Balcombe degree gas within them is at such P Vosteen [CC BY-ND]) Kong Lancaster Mark Townley, Brockmoor low densities that it is difc fi ult Abigail Chown, Bath Thomas Martin, London Calum Turner, Argyll & Bute Wendy Clark, Felsted to observe. Clouds of neutral next to each other on the sky. The Shaun May, Caergwrle Hendrik van Eerten, Bath Daniel Clarkson, London hydrogen close to the galactic team, led by Jay Lockman at the Andrea Mazzella, London Maria Vincenzi, Southsea Trevor Davies, Khorog GBAO, centre were discovered by Naomi Green Bank Observatory, inter­ Ben McDermott, Cambridge James Ward, Leeds Tajikistan McClure­ Grift fi hs of the Austral ­ pret this as originating in a cone ­ Romain Meyer, London Affonso de Rosa , Leighton Sam Waters, Cranleigh Tomas Muller Bravo, ian National University, from shaped pattern of movement, with Buzzard Lewis Whitehouse, London Southampton their 21 cm radio emission. Now some clouds having a component Thomas Dickson, Fulham Terence Williams, Anglesey Tarje Nissen-Meyer, Oxford she and other observers using the of movement towards Earth and Alyssa Drake, West Malling Tom Winder, Cambridge Paolo Pagano, St Andrews National Science Foundation’s some away. The clouds allowed Charles Draper, Bath Adam Woodhouse, Leeds Adam Parkes Bowen, 100 m Green Bank Telescope in the team to track the winds that Christopher Duffy , Glasgow Michael Wright, Wigston Dennyloanhead West Virginia, US, have found are ina fl ting the bubbles. The Chris Duffy , Washington Jack Parsons, Clacton- Honghong Wu, Dorking Elizabeth Elmer, on-Sea more than 100 such clouds mov­ team presented their results at the Nottingham Peter Wyper, Durham Fiona Porter, Glasgow ing away from the galactic centre. 231st meeting of the American Jade Eyles, Northampton Nikki Zabel, Cardiff Miika Pursiainen, The velocities of the hydro­ Astronomical Society in Washing­ Patrick Gilliland, Evesham Southampton gen clouds vary by as much as ton DC, in January this year. Elena Gonzalez-Egea, St Nicholas Rawlinson, –1 400 km s for clouds that appear http://bit.ly/2F2UbLE A&G • April 2018 • Vol. 59 • aandg.org 2.11 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/astrogeo/article-abstract/59/2/2.11/4935769 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Astronomy & Geophysics Oxford University Press

Hydrogen tracks Fermi bubbles

Astronomy & Geophysics , Volume 59 (2) – Apr 1, 2018
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The Royal Astronomical Society
Copyright
© 2018 Royal Astronomical Society
ISSN
1366-8781
eISSN
1468-4004
D.O.I.
10.1093/astrogeo/aty072
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Abstract

NEWS Water and SpaceX sends Starman into the headlines organics found SPACEFLIGHT SpaceX’s successful first Falcon Heavy launch on 6 in meteorites February not only tested the tech­ nology needed to achieve and CHEMISTRY Two meteorites that surpass Earth orbit, but also sent reached Earth separately in 1998 a bright red sports car into an hold traces of liquid water and elliptical orbit stretching beyond organic compounds including the orbit of Mars – and into the hydrocarbons and amino acids, news worldwide. trapped within tiny salt crystals. The Falcon Heavy rocket is the The meteorites hit the ground most powerful launch vehicle in Texas and Morocco; they were since the Saturn V, able to lift preserved at NASA’s Johnson 64 tonnes to orbit. It is part of Space Centre in Texas, making commercial enterprise SpaceX’s possible the delicate job of teasing programme to launch rockets out the crystals and analysing the capable of exploring to the Moon, contents of the u fl id inclusions. Mars and beyond. The Falcon Queenie Chan, a planetary sci­ Heavy first stage used three of The two side boosters from the Falcon Heavy land together. (SpaceX) entist at the Open University who the reusable SpaceX Falcon 9 was the study’s lead author, said: modules. Two of the rockets company’s sleek space suits in ephemerides from NASA’s Jet “This is the first time we have detached from the central one a relaxed pose at the wheel, the Propulsion Laboratory at the found abundant organic matter and landed back at Cape Canav­ car provided spectacular images. HORIZONS web interface. Mod­ also associated with liquid water eral, almost simultaneously; Like Voyager before it, the car is elling by Hanno Rein of the Uni­ that is really crucial to the origin the third crashed into the sea. loaded with cultural references: versity Toronto at Scarborough of life and the origin of complex The second stage provided the the words “Don’t panic” on the and colleagues (published on organic compounds in space.” acceleration that took the rocket dashboard, “Made on Earth the ArXiv) indicate that the Tesla The same process responsible for payload into – then out of – geo­ by humans” printed on circuit will have a dynamical lifetime trapping these compounds may synchronous Earth orbit. boards, Isaac Asimov’s Founda- of a few tens of millions of years also trap life or biomolecules in The payload was a red sports tion novels in electronic form and and that the chances of a collision the same way in other meteorites car, a Tesla Roadster owned by David Bowie’s song Space Oddity with the Earth in the next million or in planetary environments. SpaceX founder Elon Musk. With playing on repeat. years are 6%. Chan et al. published their the top down and a dummy Observers wishing to track TESLA LIFETIME http://bit.ly/2ovyE82 work in Science Advances. called Starman in one of the the Roadster can do so using HORIZONS http://go.nasa.gov/1QdKGr6 http://bit.ly/2EZHDbU NEW FELLOWS The following have been Albans Cambridge GALACTIC EVOLUTION Clouds of put forward to Council Richard Grimes, Charles Reynolds, Newport for election as a Fellow of Aberystwyth neutral hydrogen provide mark­ Javier Rosales, London the RAS: Jacqueline Gruhn, London ers for the o fl w of superheated David Ross, Southsea Omakshi Agiwal, London John Hope, Bath James Salmon, London gas into the Fermi bubbles, above Sakir Ahmed, Kingston Maya Horton, Hatfield Josephine Seed, Teleford and below the plane of the Milky Upon Thames Marvin W Huddleston, Aurora Sicilia-Aguilar, Way. They show the energetic Stefano Akram, London Mesquite, USA Dundee o fl w of gas in a fountain from the Matthew Allcock, Chris Joly, London Jesper Skottfelt, Milton Rossendale galactic centre, moving upwards Keynes Aaron Jones, Edgbaston Alexander Bader, Lancaster and outwards. Nuria Jordana, Bath Ashley Spindler, Irene Barbeito, Surbiton Farnborough These giant regions of super­ Sofia Kalamatianou , Joe Bentley, Birmingham Candice Tait, London London heated gas were discovered by Kristan Boyett, Oxford Hongming Tang, David Keitel, Glasgow NASA’s Fermi Gamma­ ray Space The hydrogen clouds spread into Melissa Brobby, Gravesend Manchester Tom Kimpson, Dorking Telescope; they seem to arise intergalactic space in this artist’s Jonathan Carrick, Lancaster Matthew Temple, Gerald Leung, Glasgow from a hot cosmic wind from the impression; how far they spread from Cambridge Andre Chicrala, Newcastle Andrew Levan, Coventry galactic centre, but the million­ our galaxy is unknown. (S Brunier/ Jeffrey Thompson , Dave Choi, Kowloon, Hong Christopher Lorch, Balcombe degree gas within them is at such P Vosteen [CC BY-ND]) Kong Lancaster Mark Townley, Brockmoor low densities that it is difc fi ult Abigail Chown, Bath Thomas Martin, London Calum Turner, Argyll & Bute Wendy Clark, Felsted to observe. Clouds of neutral next to each other on the sky. The Shaun May, Caergwrle Hendrik van Eerten, Bath Daniel Clarkson, London hydrogen close to the galactic team, led by Jay Lockman at the Andrea Mazzella, London Maria Vincenzi, Southsea Trevor Davies, Khorog GBAO, centre were discovered by Naomi Green Bank Observatory, inter­ Ben McDermott, Cambridge James Ward, Leeds Tajikistan McClure­ Grift fi hs of the Austral ­ pret this as originating in a cone ­ Romain Meyer, London Affonso de Rosa , Leighton Sam Waters, Cranleigh Tomas Muller Bravo, ian National University, from shaped pattern of movement, with Buzzard Lewis Whitehouse, London Southampton their 21 cm radio emission. Now some clouds having a component Thomas Dickson, Fulham Terence Williams, Anglesey Tarje Nissen-Meyer, Oxford she and other observers using the of movement towards Earth and Alyssa Drake, West Malling Tom Winder, Cambridge Paolo Pagano, St Andrews National Science Foundation’s some away. The clouds allowed Charles Draper, Bath Adam Woodhouse, Leeds Adam Parkes Bowen, 100 m Green Bank Telescope in the team to track the winds that Christopher Duffy , Glasgow Michael Wright, Wigston Dennyloanhead West Virginia, US, have found are ina fl ting the bubbles. The Chris Duffy , Washington Jack Parsons, Clacton- Honghong Wu, Dorking Elizabeth Elmer, on-Sea more than 100 such clouds mov­ team presented their results at the Nottingham Peter Wyper, Durham Fiona Porter, Glasgow ing away from the galactic centre. 231st meeting of the American Jade Eyles, Northampton Nikki Zabel, Cardiff Miika Pursiainen, The velocities of the hydro­ Astronomical Society in Washing­ Patrick Gilliland, Evesham Southampton gen clouds vary by as much as ton DC, in January this year. Elena Gonzalez-Egea, St Nicholas Rawlinson, –1 400 km s for clouds that appear http://bit.ly/2F2UbLE A&G • April 2018 • Vol. 59 • aandg.org 2.11 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/astrogeo/article-abstract/59/2/2.11/4935769 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

Journal

Astronomy & GeophysicsOxford University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2018

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