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Goods Donations Increase Charitable Credit for Low-Warmth Donors

Goods Donations Increase Charitable Credit for Low-Warmth Donors Low-warmth actors are often assumed to lack communal (or other-oriented) intentions, even when acting generously. Low-warmth donors must therefore send stronger signals of their communal intent when donating to receive the same amount of charitable credit as high-warmth donors. Because goods are linked with communal norms, we find that donating goods allows low-warmth donors to signal communal intent and increase charitable credit received. Study 1 establishes that low-warmth donors receive less credit for unspecified donations than their high-warmth counterparts. Studies 2A and 2B show that goods donations, compared to equally valued monetary or unspecified donations, increase charitable credit for low-warmth donors. Studies 3A and 3B show that donating goods boosts charitable credit for low-warmth donors in particular; high-warmth donors are assumed to have communal intentions, and receive large amounts of credit, regardless of donation type. Finally, study 4 shows that low-warmth donors can increase charitable credit for monetary donations by describing the donation in communal terms—specifically, as a gift. This research has clear practical implications. For example, many corporations are viewed as low warmth, and most corporate donations are monetary, yet companies always have the option to donate goods instead. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Consumer Research Oxford University Press

Goods Donations Increase Charitable Credit for Low-Warmth Donors

Journal of Consumer Research , Volume 45 (2): 19 – Aug 1, 2018

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References (51)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Consumer Research, Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0093-5301
eISSN
1537-5277
DOI
10.1093/jcr/ucx126
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Low-warmth actors are often assumed to lack communal (or other-oriented) intentions, even when acting generously. Low-warmth donors must therefore send stronger signals of their communal intent when donating to receive the same amount of charitable credit as high-warmth donors. Because goods are linked with communal norms, we find that donating goods allows low-warmth donors to signal communal intent and increase charitable credit received. Study 1 establishes that low-warmth donors receive less credit for unspecified donations than their high-warmth counterparts. Studies 2A and 2B show that goods donations, compared to equally valued monetary or unspecified donations, increase charitable credit for low-warmth donors. Studies 3A and 3B show that donating goods boosts charitable credit for low-warmth donors in particular; high-warmth donors are assumed to have communal intentions, and receive large amounts of credit, regardless of donation type. Finally, study 4 shows that low-warmth donors can increase charitable credit for monetary donations by describing the donation in communal terms—specifically, as a gift. This research has clear practical implications. For example, many corporations are viewed as low warmth, and most corporate donations are monetary, yet companies always have the option to donate goods instead.

Journal

Journal of Consumer ResearchOxford University Press

Published: Aug 1, 2018

Keywords: prosocial behavior; warmth; communal and exchange; donation type; branding; charitable credit; corporate social responsibility

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