Glycated peptide levels are associated with cognitive decline among non-diabetic older women

Glycated peptide levels are associated with cognitive decline among non-diabetic older women Abstract Background The association between diabetes and dementia may be explained in part by elevated levels of glycated peptides; we sought to determine if serum glycated peptides predicted cognitive decline in non-diabetic older adults. Methods We prospectively studied 525 community-dwelling non-diabetic women, mean age of 82 years, and analyzed baseline glycated peptides (serum level of fructosamine and glycated albumin). Cognitive outcomes included 5-year decline on the short Mini-Mental State Examination (sMMSE), Trails B, and performance on a battery of five other cognitive tests at the follow-up visit. Generalized linear models were adjusted for education, age, race, physical activity, body mass index, and vascular disease. Results Women with higher level of fructosamine (upper two tertiles) had greater 5-year decline in Trails B performance compared to women in the lowest tertile (adjusted mean change=67 vs. 50 sec, p=0.046), but change in sMMSE was not different between groups. Higher fructosamine was also associated with worse cognitive function 5 years later: adjusted mean score for the California Verbal Learning Test-II Short Form was 22.7 vs. 23.9 (p=0.010) and for Category Fluency was 10.1 vs. 11.1 (p=0.003). Higher glycated albumin was also associated with worse performance on Category Fluency (10.1 vs. 11.1, p=0.003) but not on any other test. Conclusions Among older non-diabetic women, higher concentrations of glycated peptides may be associated with greater cognitive decline, especially in measures of executive function. These associations may present new opportunities for targeted prevention and therapeutic strategies in cognitive aging. Cognition, Diabetes, Glycation, Cognitive Aging, Biomarkers © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical Sciences Oxford University Press

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
1079-5006
eISSN
1758-535X
D.O.I.
10.1093/gerona/gly111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background The association between diabetes and dementia may be explained in part by elevated levels of glycated peptides; we sought to determine if serum glycated peptides predicted cognitive decline in non-diabetic older adults. Methods We prospectively studied 525 community-dwelling non-diabetic women, mean age of 82 years, and analyzed baseline glycated peptides (serum level of fructosamine and glycated albumin). Cognitive outcomes included 5-year decline on the short Mini-Mental State Examination (sMMSE), Trails B, and performance on a battery of five other cognitive tests at the follow-up visit. Generalized linear models were adjusted for education, age, race, physical activity, body mass index, and vascular disease. Results Women with higher level of fructosamine (upper two tertiles) had greater 5-year decline in Trails B performance compared to women in the lowest tertile (adjusted mean change=67 vs. 50 sec, p=0.046), but change in sMMSE was not different between groups. Higher fructosamine was also associated with worse cognitive function 5 years later: adjusted mean score for the California Verbal Learning Test-II Short Form was 22.7 vs. 23.9 (p=0.010) and for Category Fluency was 10.1 vs. 11.1 (p=0.003). Higher glycated albumin was also associated with worse performance on Category Fluency (10.1 vs. 11.1, p=0.003) but not on any other test. Conclusions Among older non-diabetic women, higher concentrations of glycated peptides may be associated with greater cognitive decline, especially in measures of executive function. These associations may present new opportunities for targeted prevention and therapeutic strategies in cognitive aging. Cognition, Diabetes, Glycation, Cognitive Aging, Biomarkers © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical SciencesOxford University Press

Published: May 7, 2018

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