Garrison, John S., and Kyle Pivetti. Sexuality and Memory in Early Modern England: Literature and the Erotics of Recollection

Garrison, John S., and Kyle Pivetti. Sexuality and Memory in Early Modern England: Literature and... REVIEWS 117 GARRISON,JOHN S., AND KYLE PIVETTI. Sexuality and Memory in Early Modern England: Literature and the Erotics of Recollection. New York and London: Routledge (Routledge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture, 28), 2016. 272 pp. £90.00. ISBN 978–1–138–84438–4. This collection of 16 essays pursues several interrelated questions as a response to calls such as those by Carla Freccero in 2011 for queer theory to turn its attention more fully to the interrelations of desire and subjectivity as these intersect with ‘politics, sex, community, living, and dying’. Sexuality and Memory in Early Modern England asks how sex is understood as a thing of the past. How are erotic encounters remembered, and how does remembering itself become erotic? Each of the essays thus takes as its starting point that discursive representations of sex acts recreate and imagine the body as it is subordinated to those contexts which give it meaning. The majority of the essays are about Shakespeare, Spenser and Middleton, although Marlowe, Thomas Nashe, George Peele and Michael Drayton are also considered. The col- lection is divided into three sections. The first, ‘Legacies of Desire’, addresses the ‘unhistorical’ spectre of desire, and asks what it means for queer historiography that remembering ‘inevita- bly brings the past to the present, treating it as an object of desire’ (p. 7) . The focus of the essays in the second section, ‘Bodies, Remember’, is the body as a site of personal and collec- tive memory, a subject and object which can be both sexual and national. The third and final section of the collection, ‘Intimate Refusals’, explores the possibilities of forgetting as alterna- tively memorialization, deception and transformation. Queer theorists and early modernists who have followed the field’s resurgent interest in the cultural poetics of memory will find much to build on in these thoughtful studies. [doi: 10.1093/fmls/cqx052] GIBSON,RICHARD HUGHES. Forgiveness in Victorian Literature: Grammar, Narrative, and Community. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic (New Directions in Religion and Literature), 2016. 184 pp. £28.99. ISBN 978–1–350–00375–0. This work offers an insightful look at notions of forgiveness across Victorian texts from five authors: Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy and Oscar Wilde. Gibson opens his work with a series of engaging questions – such as ‘Must one always forgive?’ – which probe the key issues that forgiveness raised for Victorians. He presents a useful examination of the relationship between narrative and forgiveness, demonstrating how forgiveness demands a narrative con- struct and how forgiveness ‘congregates’ at the conclusions of Victorian narratives. Further, in exploring forgiveness and community, he analyses links between forgiveness, freedom and agency in the public sphere, as well as the ability of forgiveness to restore broken communi- ties. Following the introduction, the study is divided into three chapters. The first focuses on Charles Dickens and the limits of forgiveness (in erasing the past, as well as in the divide between forgiveness and the socially imaginable, for example), and his views on earning moral redemption, with transgression as a debt to be repaid; it analyses Dickens’s writing in 1846, including The Life of Our Lord, plans for a house for ‘fallen’ women, The Battle of Life and Dombey and Son. The second chapter concentrates on Anthony Trollope and George Eliot, particularly The Vicar of Bullhampton and Adam Bede, and their representation of the consequences of transgression and forgiveness in communal contexts, and of forgiveness in contexts outside of traditional Christian practice. The third and final chapter turns to for- giveness in the 1890s, with Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure and Oscar Wilde’s De Profundis,as a counterpoint, to examine how the language of forgiveness evolves through Hardy’s attack on and preoccupation with forgiveness, and Wilde’s endorsement of forgiveness that empha- sizes dialogue between religion and literature. This work is well balanced, wide ranging and accessible; it would be of interest to students and scholars of Victorian literature and theology alike. [doi: 10.1093/fmls/cqx053] HARTUNG,HEIKE. Ageing, Gender, and Illness in Anglophone Literature: Narrating Age in the Bildungsroman. New York and London: Routledge (Routledge Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Literature, 59), 2016. 252 pp. £90.00. ISBN 978–1–138–85850–3. The title of this work immediately signals its ambitiousness. Its focus is not solely on old age but on the processes of ageing, and, specifically, on ageing’s intersection with gender and illness, both of which constitute extensive ‘subjects’ in themselves. In addition, Heike Hartung remarks that the Bildungsroman, the textual object of study here, comprises three opposing categorizations under its aegis, all of which are discussed: ‘first, the German set against the [English] (or European) version; second, the eigh- teenth- set against the nineteenth-century novel; and third, the male set against the female vari- ant’ (p. 84). Hartung begins her study by noting the cultural lacunae surrounding Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/fmls/article-abstract/54/1/117/4798976 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forum for Modern Language Studies Oxford University Press

Garrison, John S., and Kyle Pivetti. Sexuality and Memory in Early Modern England: Literature and the Erotics of Recollection

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/ou_press/garrison-john-s-and-kyle-pivetti-sexuality-and-memory-in-early-modern-3PcIkBKfZf
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Court of the University of St Andrews. All rights reserved. The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland: No. SC013532.
ISSN
0015-8518
eISSN
1471-6860
D.O.I.
10.1093/fmls/cqx052
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS 117 GARRISON,JOHN S., AND KYLE PIVETTI. Sexuality and Memory in Early Modern England: Literature and the Erotics of Recollection. New York and London: Routledge (Routledge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture, 28), 2016. 272 pp. £90.00. ISBN 978–1–138–84438–4. This collection of 16 essays pursues several interrelated questions as a response to calls such as those by Carla Freccero in 2011 for queer theory to turn its attention more fully to the interrelations of desire and subjectivity as these intersect with ‘politics, sex, community, living, and dying’. Sexuality and Memory in Early Modern England asks how sex is understood as a thing of the past. How are erotic encounters remembered, and how does remembering itself become erotic? Each of the essays thus takes as its starting point that discursive representations of sex acts recreate and imagine the body as it is subordinated to those contexts which give it meaning. The majority of the essays are about Shakespeare, Spenser and Middleton, although Marlowe, Thomas Nashe, George Peele and Michael Drayton are also considered. The col- lection is divided into three sections. The first, ‘Legacies of Desire’, addresses the ‘unhistorical’ spectre of desire, and asks what it means for queer historiography that remembering ‘inevita- bly brings the past to the present, treating it as an object of desire’ (p. 7) . The focus of the essays in the second section, ‘Bodies, Remember’, is the body as a site of personal and collec- tive memory, a subject and object which can be both sexual and national. The third and final section of the collection, ‘Intimate Refusals’, explores the possibilities of forgetting as alterna- tively memorialization, deception and transformation. Queer theorists and early modernists who have followed the field’s resurgent interest in the cultural poetics of memory will find much to build on in these thoughtful studies. [doi: 10.1093/fmls/cqx052] GIBSON,RICHARD HUGHES. Forgiveness in Victorian Literature: Grammar, Narrative, and Community. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic (New Directions in Religion and Literature), 2016. 184 pp. £28.99. ISBN 978–1–350–00375–0. This work offers an insightful look at notions of forgiveness across Victorian texts from five authors: Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy and Oscar Wilde. Gibson opens his work with a series of engaging questions – such as ‘Must one always forgive?’ – which probe the key issues that forgiveness raised for Victorians. He presents a useful examination of the relationship between narrative and forgiveness, demonstrating how forgiveness demands a narrative con- struct and how forgiveness ‘congregates’ at the conclusions of Victorian narratives. Further, in exploring forgiveness and community, he analyses links between forgiveness, freedom and agency in the public sphere, as well as the ability of forgiveness to restore broken communi- ties. Following the introduction, the study is divided into three chapters. The first focuses on Charles Dickens and the limits of forgiveness (in erasing the past, as well as in the divide between forgiveness and the socially imaginable, for example), and his views on earning moral redemption, with transgression as a debt to be repaid; it analyses Dickens’s writing in 1846, including The Life of Our Lord, plans for a house for ‘fallen’ women, The Battle of Life and Dombey and Son. The second chapter concentrates on Anthony Trollope and George Eliot, particularly The Vicar of Bullhampton and Adam Bede, and their representation of the consequences of transgression and forgiveness in communal contexts, and of forgiveness in contexts outside of traditional Christian practice. The third and final chapter turns to for- giveness in the 1890s, with Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure and Oscar Wilde’s De Profundis,as a counterpoint, to examine how the language of forgiveness evolves through Hardy’s attack on and preoccupation with forgiveness, and Wilde’s endorsement of forgiveness that empha- sizes dialogue between religion and literature. This work is well balanced, wide ranging and accessible; it would be of interest to students and scholars of Victorian literature and theology alike. [doi: 10.1093/fmls/cqx053] HARTUNG,HEIKE. Ageing, Gender, and Illness in Anglophone Literature: Narrating Age in the Bildungsroman. New York and London: Routledge (Routledge Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Literature, 59), 2016. 252 pp. £90.00. ISBN 978–1–138–85850–3. The title of this work immediately signals its ambitiousness. Its focus is not solely on old age but on the processes of ageing, and, specifically, on ageing’s intersection with gender and illness, both of which constitute extensive ‘subjects’ in themselves. In addition, Heike Hartung remarks that the Bildungsroman, the textual object of study here, comprises three opposing categorizations under its aegis, all of which are discussed: ‘first, the German set against the [English] (or European) version; second, the eigh- teenth- set against the nineteenth-century novel; and third, the male set against the female vari- ant’ (p. 84). Hartung begins her study by noting the cultural lacunae surrounding Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/fmls/article-abstract/54/1/117/4798976 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

Journal

Forum for Modern Language StudiesOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off