Gallery Editor’s Note

Gallery Editor’s Note Finis Dunaway The discovery of insulin could be told as a story of heroic scientists forging new frontiers of medical knowledge to save human lives. Such accounts, though, render invisible the role of animals in bio- medical research and the relationships formed between human scien- tists and their animal subjects. In this issue’s Gallery essay, Matthew Klingle shows how visual images can complicate and enrich this human-centered narrative. Taking us to the University of Toronto in the early 1920s, Klingle looks at a series of photographs and other images of dogs used in diabetes research. He situates these pictures within the broader environmental context of an urban setting that provided university researchers with a steady supply of strays. Through a wide-ranging analysis of the visual record, Klingle addresses larger questions about the ethical debates over animal ex- perimentation—from the critiques of the antivivisection movement during the early twentieth century to the views of some diabetics and diabetes activists today. His essay offers a model for scholars inter- ested in representations of animals and illuminates the changing, contested meanings of images over time. The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Environmental History and the Forest History Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com Finis Dunaway, “Gallery Editor’s Note,” Environmental History 23 (2018): 367 doi: 10.1093/envhis/emx167 Advance Access Publication Date: 13 January 2018 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/envhis/article-abstract/23/2/367/4807507 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental History Oxford University Press

Gallery Editor’s Note

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Environmental History and the Forest History Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1084-5453
eISSN
1930-8892
D.O.I.
10.1093/envhis/emx167
Publisher site
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Abstract

Finis Dunaway The discovery of insulin could be told as a story of heroic scientists forging new frontiers of medical knowledge to save human lives. Such accounts, though, render invisible the role of animals in bio- medical research and the relationships formed between human scien- tists and their animal subjects. In this issue’s Gallery essay, Matthew Klingle shows how visual images can complicate and enrich this human-centered narrative. Taking us to the University of Toronto in the early 1920s, Klingle looks at a series of photographs and other images of dogs used in diabetes research. He situates these pictures within the broader environmental context of an urban setting that provided university researchers with a steady supply of strays. Through a wide-ranging analysis of the visual record, Klingle addresses larger questions about the ethical debates over animal ex- perimentation—from the critiques of the antivivisection movement during the early twentieth century to the views of some diabetics and diabetes activists today. His essay offers a model for scholars inter- ested in representations of animals and illuminates the changing, contested meanings of images over time. The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Environmental History and the Forest History Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com Finis Dunaway, “Gallery Editor’s Note,” Environmental History 23 (2018): 367 doi: 10.1093/envhis/emx167 Advance Access Publication Date: 13 January 2018 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/envhis/article-abstract/23/2/367/4807507 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

Journal

Environmental HistoryOxford University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2018

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