Functional Transplantation of the Rat Pituitary Gland

Functional Transplantation of the Rat Pituitary Gland AbstractOBJECTIVEThese studies evaluated the ability of transplanted pituitary cells to restore pituitary function in Hypophysectomized rats.METHODSThe pituitary glands of neonatal Lewis rats were rapidly removed, enzymatically dispersed, and stereotactically introduced into the third ventricle of hypophysectomized adult male Lewis rats. Four weeks after implantation, plasma levels of anterior pituitary hormones in implanted animals were compared with those of sham-transplanted control animals.RESULTSPlasma levels of prolactin, growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and β-endorphin were below the range of detection in 14 sham-operated animals. In implanted animals, restitution of serum prolactin occurred in 100% of the animals tested, with levels of 2.6 ± 1.0 ng/ml (mean ± standard error of the mean; normal, 2-4 ng/ml). Growth hormone was assayable in 71% of the animals, with a mean value of 29 ± 13 ng/ml over all animals (normal, 1-100 ng/ml); thyroid-stimulating hormone was restored in 68%, with mean resting levels of 79 ± 13 ng/ml (normal, 100-400 ng/ml); luteinizing hormone levels were found in 53%, with mean levels over all animals of 0.2 ± 0.1 ng/ml (normal, 0.5-1.0 ng/ml); and β-endorphin was restored in 45% to high resting levels of 163 ± 31 pg/ml (normal, 20-30 pg/ml). A challenge with hypothalamic releasing factor and a cold stress test were performed on the animals that had received transplants. Positive hormone responses to both of these tests suggested sensitivity of the pituitary grafts to both endogenous and exogenous sources of stimulation. Histological sections of paraformaldehyde-fixed brains from implanted animals clearly demonstrated survival of clusters of grafted pituitary cells. Positive immunohistochemical staining for adrenocorticotropic hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone was demonstrated in sections of the grafted tissue.CONCLUSIONThese data suggest survival of neonatal pituitary transplants in the third ventricle of adult hypophysectomized rats with concomitant restoration of anterior pituitary hormone function. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Functional Transplantation of the Rat Pituitary Gland

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES Marius Maxwell, M.B.B.Chir., D.Phil., Christopher Allegra, M.D., John MacGillivray, M.D., Dora W. Hsu, M.Sc., E. Tessa Hedley-Whyte, M.D., Peter Riskind, M.D., Joseph R. Madsen, M.D., Peter McL. Black, M.D., Ph.D. Neurosurgery Service, Brigham and Women's and Children's Hospitals QRM, PMB); Neurosurgery (MM, CA, JM), Neuropathology (DWH, ETH-W), and Neurology (PR) Laboratories, Massachusetts General Hospital; and Departments of Surgery, Pathology, and Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts OBJECTIVE: These studies evaluated the ability of transplanted pituitary cells to restore pituitary function in Hypophysectomized rats. METHODS: The pituitary glands of neonatal Lewis rats were rapidly removed, enzym atically dispersed, and stereotactically introduced into the third ventricle of hypophysectomized adult male Lewis rats. Four weeks after implantation, plasma levels of anterior pituitary hormones in implanted animals were compared with those of sham-transplanted control animals. RESULTS: Plasma levels of prolactin, growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and /3-endorphin were below the range of detection in 14 sham-operated animals. In implanted animals, restitution of serum prolactin occurred in 100% of the animals tested, with levels of 2.6 ± 1 . 0 ng/ml (mean ± standard error of the mean; normal, 2 -4 ng/ml). Growth hormone was assayable in 7 1 % of the animals, with a mean value of 29 ± 13 ng/ml over all animals (normal, 1 -1 0 0 ng/ml); thyroid-stimulating hormone was restored in 6 8 % , with mean resting levels of 79 ± 13 ng/ml (normal, 1 0 0 -4 0 0 ng/ml); luteinizing hormone levels were found in 5 3 % , with mean levels over all animals of 0.2 ± 0.1 ng/ml (normal, 0 .5 -1 .0 ng/ml); and /3-endorphin was restored in 4 5 % to high resting levels of 163 ± 31 pg/ml (normal, 2 0 -3 0 pg/ml). A challenge with hypothalamic releasing factor and a cold stress test were...
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Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199811000-00077
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractOBJECTIVEThese studies evaluated the ability of transplanted pituitary cells to restore pituitary function in Hypophysectomized rats.METHODSThe pituitary glands of neonatal Lewis rats were rapidly removed, enzymatically dispersed, and stereotactically introduced into the third ventricle of hypophysectomized adult male Lewis rats. Four weeks after implantation, plasma levels of anterior pituitary hormones in implanted animals were compared with those of sham-transplanted control animals.RESULTSPlasma levels of prolactin, growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and β-endorphin were below the range of detection in 14 sham-operated animals. In implanted animals, restitution of serum prolactin occurred in 100% of the animals tested, with levels of 2.6 ± 1.0 ng/ml (mean ± standard error of the mean; normal, 2-4 ng/ml). Growth hormone was assayable in 71% of the animals, with a mean value of 29 ± 13 ng/ml over all animals (normal, 1-100 ng/ml); thyroid-stimulating hormone was restored in 68%, with mean resting levels of 79 ± 13 ng/ml (normal, 100-400 ng/ml); luteinizing hormone levels were found in 53%, with mean levels over all animals of 0.2 ± 0.1 ng/ml (normal, 0.5-1.0 ng/ml); and β-endorphin was restored in 45% to high resting levels of 163 ± 31 pg/ml (normal, 20-30 pg/ml). A challenge with hypothalamic releasing factor and a cold stress test were performed on the animals that had received transplants. Positive hormone responses to both of these tests suggested sensitivity of the pituitary grafts to both endogenous and exogenous sources of stimulation. Histological sections of paraformaldehyde-fixed brains from implanted animals clearly demonstrated survival of clusters of grafted pituitary cells. Positive immunohistochemical staining for adrenocorticotropic hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone was demonstrated in sections of the grafted tissue.CONCLUSIONThese data suggest survival of neonatal pituitary transplants in the third ventricle of adult hypophysectomized rats with concomitant restoration of anterior pituitary hormone function.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Nov 1, 1998

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