Functional Radiosurgery

Functional Radiosurgery AbstractALTHOUGH THE APPLICATION of stereotactic radiosurgery for the management of functional brain disorders began in 1951, almost 50 years elapsed before it received appropriate attention. Radiosurgical techniques are used to create image-guided, physiological inactivity or focally destructive brain lesions without neurophysiological guidance. The lack of neurophysiological guidance remains the greatest argument against the use of radiosurgery for selected disorders. Current anatomic targets include the trigeminal nerve (for trigeminal neuralgia), the thalamus (for tremor or pain), the cingulate gyrus or anterior internal capsule (for pain or psychiatric illness), the globus pallidus (for symptoms of Parkinson's disease), and the hippocampus (for epilepsy). The use of radiosurgery as a “lesion generator” is based on extensive animal studies that defined the dose, volume, and temporal response of the irradiated tissue. The usefulness of radiosurgery has been compared with that of microsurgical, percutaneous, and electrode-based techniques used for functional neurological disorders. At present, the long-term results after functional radiosurgery procedures remain to be documented. The current indications and expected outcomes after radiosurgery are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Functional Radiosurgery

Functional Radiosurgery

Douglas Kondziolka, M .D. Departments of Neurological Surgery and Radiation O ncolog y and the Center for Image-Guided Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania A L T H O U G H THE A P P L IC A T IO N of stereotactic radiosurgery for the management of functional brain disorders began in 1951, almost 50 years elapsed before it received appropriate attention. Radiosurgical techniques are used to create image-guided, physiological inactivity or focally destructive brain lesions without neurophysiological guidance. The lack of neurophysiological guidance remains the greatest argument against the use of radiosurgery for selected disorders. Current anatomic targets include the trigeminal nerve (for trigeminal neuralgia), the thalamus (for tremor or pain), the cingulate gyrus or anterior internal capsule (for pain or psychiatric illness), the globus pallidus (for symptoms of Parkinson's disease), and the hippocampus (for epilepsy). The use of radiosurgery as a "lesion generator" is based on extensive animal studies that defined the dose, volume, and temporal response of the irradiated tissue. The usefulness of radiosurgery has been compared with that of microsurgical, percutaneous, and electrode-based techniques used for functional neurological disorders. At present, the long-term results after functional radiosurgery procedures remain to be documented. The current indications and expected outcomes after radiosurgery are discussed. (Neurosurgery 44:12-22, 1999) Key words: Epilepsy, Pain, Parkinson's disease, Radiosurgery, Tremor, Trigeminal neuralgia he origin of stereotactic radiosurgery parallels the d e ­ tissue in a maimer similar to that of a leucotome or other instru­ velopm ental history of functional neurosurgery. Leksell ment (Fig. 1). Not until 1975 were circular collimators used to (23) initially conceived the idea of closed-cranium , create more spherical radiation volumes better suited to the single-session...
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Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199901000-00005
Publisher site
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Abstract

AbstractALTHOUGH THE APPLICATION of stereotactic radiosurgery for the management of functional brain disorders began in 1951, almost 50 years elapsed before it received appropriate attention. Radiosurgical techniques are used to create image-guided, physiological inactivity or focally destructive brain lesions without neurophysiological guidance. The lack of neurophysiological guidance remains the greatest argument against the use of radiosurgery for selected disorders. Current anatomic targets include the trigeminal nerve (for trigeminal neuralgia), the thalamus (for tremor or pain), the cingulate gyrus or anterior internal capsule (for pain or psychiatric illness), the globus pallidus (for symptoms of Parkinson's disease), and the hippocampus (for epilepsy). The use of radiosurgery as a “lesion generator” is based on extensive animal studies that defined the dose, volume, and temporal response of the irradiated tissue. The usefulness of radiosurgery has been compared with that of microsurgical, percutaneous, and electrode-based techniques used for functional neurological disorders. At present, the long-term results after functional radiosurgery procedures remain to be documented. The current indications and expected outcomes after radiosurgery are discussed.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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