Feral rice from introgression of weedy rice genes into transgenic herbicide-resistant hybrid-rice progeny

Feral rice from introgression of weedy rice genes into transgenic herbicide-resistant hybrid-rice... Abstract Pollen-mediated herbicide-resistance transgene flow occurs bidirectionally between transgenic cultivated rice and weedy rice. The potential risk of weedy traits introgressing into hybrid rice is underestimated and poorly understood. Two of each glufosinate-resistant transgenic rice varieties and hybrid rice (F1) and their succeeding generations (F2-F4) were planted for three years in weedy-rice-free field plots adjacent to experimental weedy-rice fields. Weedy-rice-like (feral) plants, both glufosinate-resistant and with red-pericarp seed, were initially found only among the F3 generations of the two glufosinate-resistant transgenic hybrid rice. The composite fitness (an index based on eight productivity and weediness traits) of the feral progeny was significantly higher than that of glufosinate-resistant transgenic hybrid rice (the original female parent of feral progeny) under common monoculture garden conditions. Hybrid rice progeny segregated into individuals of variable height and extended flowering. Hybrid rice F2 generations had higher outcrossing rates by pollen reception (0.96%-1.65%) than their progenitors (0.07%-0.98%). Herbicide-resistant weedy rice can rapidly arise by pollen-mediated gene flow from weedy to transgenic hybrid rice. Their segregating pollen-receptive progeny pose greater agro-ecological risk than transgenic varieties. The safety assessment and management regulations for transgenic hybrid rice should take into account the risk of bidirectional gene flow. transgenic rice, hybrid rice, weedy rice, gene flow, herbicide-resistance, ecological risk © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Botany Oxford University Press

Feral rice from introgression of weedy rice genes into transgenic herbicide-resistant hybrid-rice progeny

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0022-0957
eISSN
1460-2431
D.O.I.
10.1093/jxb/ery210
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Pollen-mediated herbicide-resistance transgene flow occurs bidirectionally between transgenic cultivated rice and weedy rice. The potential risk of weedy traits introgressing into hybrid rice is underestimated and poorly understood. Two of each glufosinate-resistant transgenic rice varieties and hybrid rice (F1) and their succeeding generations (F2-F4) were planted for three years in weedy-rice-free field plots adjacent to experimental weedy-rice fields. Weedy-rice-like (feral) plants, both glufosinate-resistant and with red-pericarp seed, were initially found only among the F3 generations of the two glufosinate-resistant transgenic hybrid rice. The composite fitness (an index based on eight productivity and weediness traits) of the feral progeny was significantly higher than that of glufosinate-resistant transgenic hybrid rice (the original female parent of feral progeny) under common monoculture garden conditions. Hybrid rice progeny segregated into individuals of variable height and extended flowering. Hybrid rice F2 generations had higher outcrossing rates by pollen reception (0.96%-1.65%) than their progenitors (0.07%-0.98%). Herbicide-resistant weedy rice can rapidly arise by pollen-mediated gene flow from weedy to transgenic hybrid rice. Their segregating pollen-receptive progeny pose greater agro-ecological risk than transgenic varieties. The safety assessment and management regulations for transgenic hybrid rice should take into account the risk of bidirectional gene flow. transgenic rice, hybrid rice, weedy rice, gene flow, herbicide-resistance, ecological risk © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Journal of Experimental BotanyOxford University Press

Published: Jun 5, 2018

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