Endemism hotspots are linked to stable climatic refugia

Endemism hotspots are linked to stable climatic refugia Annals of Botany 119: 1247, 2017 doi:10.1093/aob/mcx008, available online at www.aob.oxfordjournals.org CORRIGENDUM Susan Harrison and Reed Noss Annals of Botany 119: 207–214, 2017 There was an error in the caption for Figure 1. The figure and its caption are given below: Hotspots Mtns. of SW China Mtns. of Caucasus Irano- Central Asia Anatolian North American Indo- California Coastal Plain Burma Floristic Japan Province Mediterranean Basin Caribbean Madrean Himalaya Islands Polynesia- Pine-Oak Guinean Micronesia Philippines Woodlands Forests Horn of Mesoamerica of W. Africa Wallacea Africa East Cerrado Tumbes-Chocó Melanesian Eastern Western Ghats Islands -Magdalena Afromontane & Sri Lanka Tropical Polynesia- Andes Micronesia New Atlantic Sundaland Succulent Forest Caledonia Karoo Chilean Madagascar & Coastal Winter Indian Ocean Forests New Rainfall- Islands of Zealand Valdivian Cape Eastern Maputaland- Southwest Forests Floristic Africa Pondoland- Australia Province Forests of East Albany Australia FIG. 1. Currently recognized global hotspots of plant endemism, which are defined as having >1500 endemic plant species and >70 % habitat conversion. Stephen D. NashV Conservation International. Also, the title of the reference by Batori Z, VojtkoA, Farkas T, et al. 2017 should read: Large- and small-scale environmental factors drive distributions of cool-adapted plants in karstic microrefugia. The online paper has been corrected. The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Botany Oxford University Press

Endemism hotspots are linked to stable climatic refugia

Annals of Botany , Volume 119 (7) – May 1, 2017
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Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0305-7364
eISSN
1095-8290
D.O.I.
10.1093/aob/mcx008
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Abstract

Annals of Botany 119: 1247, 2017 doi:10.1093/aob/mcx008, available online at www.aob.oxfordjournals.org CORRIGENDUM Susan Harrison and Reed Noss Annals of Botany 119: 207–214, 2017 There was an error in the caption for Figure 1. The figure and its caption are given below: Hotspots Mtns. of SW China Mtns. of Caucasus Irano- Central Asia Anatolian North American Indo- California Coastal Plain Burma Floristic Japan Province Mediterranean Basin Caribbean Madrean Himalaya Islands Polynesia- Pine-Oak Guinean Micronesia Philippines Woodlands Forests Horn of Mesoamerica of W. Africa Wallacea Africa East Cerrado Tumbes-Chocó Melanesian Eastern Western Ghats Islands -Magdalena Afromontane & Sri Lanka Tropical Polynesia- Andes Micronesia New Atlantic Sundaland Succulent Forest Caledonia Karoo Chilean Madagascar & Coastal Winter Indian Ocean Forests New Rainfall- Islands of Zealand Valdivian Cape Eastern Maputaland- Southwest Forests Floristic Africa Pondoland- Australia Province Forests of East Albany Australia FIG. 1. Currently recognized global hotspots of plant endemism, which are defined as having >1500 endemic plant species and >70 % habitat conversion. Stephen D. NashV Conservation International. Also, the title of the reference by Batori Z, VojtkoA, Farkas T, et al. 2017 should read: Large- and small-scale environmental factors drive distributions of cool-adapted plants in karstic microrefugia. The online paper has been corrected. The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

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Annals of BotanyOxford University Press

Published: May 1, 2017

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