Enabling patients to be active participants in healthcare via informatics interventions

Enabling patients to be active participants in healthcare via informatics interventions Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 25(4), 2018, 369 doi: 10.1093/jamia/ocy019 Highlights Highlights Enabling patients to be active participants in healthcare via informatics interventions Lucila Ohno-Machado Editor-in-Chief Never before has the adoption of networked communication devices peer-review. Moon (p. 423) provides a perspective on ethical issues been so high across healthcare provider and patient communities. It in texting for HIV care in Mozambique, and Giguere (p. 393) is thus no surprise that JAMIA receives an increasing number of out- reports on how concerned participants are about privacy and secu- standing submissions in this area, which is the focus of this issue of rity when using text messaging services to report on product adher- the journal. ence in a rectal microbicide trial. Patient portals and other direct-to-consumer informatics applications Informatics interventions in public health, point of care, and ed- have become increasingly available in the last decade. Many of these ucational settings are also featured in this issue of JAMIA. McClung applications can be considered health interventions and thus deserve to (p. 435) describes the use of mobile applications in mass vaccination be evaluated in light of their costs and benefits. In this issue of JAMIA, campaigns, and Bekemeier (p. 428) discusses the generation of stan- Wolff (p. 408) provides an environmental scan of shared access to a pa- dard public health services data and evidence for decision making. tient portal, Grossman (p. 370) lists the main recommendations from Van der Veen (p. 385) reports on the association between work- early adopters of acute care patient portals, Dumitrascu (p. 447) associ- arounds and medication administration errors in bar-code-assisted ates portal use and hospital outcomes, Giardina (p. 440) evaluates pa- medication administration in hospitals. Fernando (p. 380) lists les- tient perceptions of receiving test results via portals, and Lee (p. 413) sons learned from piloting mHealth informatics practice curriculum discusses the need to modernize current recommendations for electronic into a medical elective. communication between patients and clinicians. It is gratifying to see the evolution of healthcare into a more in- In addition to patient portals, the consumers of healthcare serv- clusive, participatory partnership among providers, patients, and ices are now also actively enhancing data collected by healthcare their caregivers. It is equally exciting to see that informatics has providers, rating services and their providers, and using text messag- played a critical role in enabling new forms of communication and ing as a means of communication with providers and researchers. promoting easier access to information that can change the course Cantor (p. 419) proposes open data to measure social determinants of an individual’s health history. In upcoming issues, JAMIA will of health. Daskivich (p. 401) describes how online physician ratings continue to bring to our readers the best scholarly work in health in- fail to predict actual performance on measures of quality, value, and formatics. V The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com 369 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jamia/article-abstract/25/4/369/4931783 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association Oxford University Press

Enabling patients to be active participants in healthcare via informatics interventions

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1067-5027
eISSN
1527-974X
D.O.I.
10.1093/jamia/ocy019
Publisher site
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Abstract

Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 25(4), 2018, 369 doi: 10.1093/jamia/ocy019 Highlights Highlights Enabling patients to be active participants in healthcare via informatics interventions Lucila Ohno-Machado Editor-in-Chief Never before has the adoption of networked communication devices peer-review. Moon (p. 423) provides a perspective on ethical issues been so high across healthcare provider and patient communities. It in texting for HIV care in Mozambique, and Giguere (p. 393) is thus no surprise that JAMIA receives an increasing number of out- reports on how concerned participants are about privacy and secu- standing submissions in this area, which is the focus of this issue of rity when using text messaging services to report on product adher- the journal. ence in a rectal microbicide trial. Patient portals and other direct-to-consumer informatics applications Informatics interventions in public health, point of care, and ed- have become increasingly available in the last decade. Many of these ucational settings are also featured in this issue of JAMIA. McClung applications can be considered health interventions and thus deserve to (p. 435) describes the use of mobile applications in mass vaccination be evaluated in light of their costs and benefits. In this issue of JAMIA, campaigns, and Bekemeier (p. 428) discusses the generation of stan- Wolff (p. 408) provides an environmental scan of shared access to a pa- dard public health services data and evidence for decision making. tient portal, Grossman (p. 370) lists the main recommendations from Van der Veen (p. 385) reports on the association between work- early adopters of acute care patient portals, Dumitrascu (p. 447) associ- arounds and medication administration errors in bar-code-assisted ates portal use and hospital outcomes, Giardina (p. 440) evaluates pa- medication administration in hospitals. Fernando (p. 380) lists les- tient perceptions of receiving test results via portals, and Lee (p. 413) sons learned from piloting mHealth informatics practice curriculum discusses the need to modernize current recommendations for electronic into a medical elective. communication between patients and clinicians. It is gratifying to see the evolution of healthcare into a more in- In addition to patient portals, the consumers of healthcare serv- clusive, participatory partnership among providers, patients, and ices are now also actively enhancing data collected by healthcare their caregivers. It is equally exciting to see that informatics has providers, rating services and their providers, and using text messag- played a critical role in enabling new forms of communication and ing as a means of communication with providers and researchers. promoting easier access to information that can change the course Cantor (p. 419) proposes open data to measure social determinants of an individual’s health history. In upcoming issues, JAMIA will of health. Daskivich (p. 401) describes how online physician ratings continue to bring to our readers the best scholarly work in health in- fail to predict actual performance on measures of quality, value, and formatics. V The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com 369 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/jamia/article-abstract/25/4/369/4931783 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

Journal

Journal of the American Medical Informatics AssociationOxford University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2018

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